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By Bill Morrison for the Rockabilly Hall of Fame ©2005


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"September '05"
Volume 26

September 2005 - ©Bill Morrison



This month's column is dedicated to those who lost their life on 9-11-2001, and their families and loved ones. We would also pay homage to the military service men and women, first responders, and our Homeland Security hero's who protect America with bravery, honor and personal sacrifice.
To the murdering Muslim fanatics that have now infected the entire world with their religious ignorance and hatred of everything and everyone who is free - it is our prayer that your suffering will be brought to a rapid conclusion, so you can go down to your just reward.


Quote of the Month
Quote: "I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means put down."   -- Bob Newhart


September Highlights
WSM radio, The Grand Ole Opry, Opryland, The Nashville Network and the Ryman Auditorium were purchased by Edward L. Gaylord on September 1, 1983. The fate of Traditional country music in Nashville was sealed.

Connie Smith and Bob Luman joined the Grand Ole Opry September 2, 1965.

Loretta Lynn signed her first major recording contract September 3, 1961.

Dottie West died in a Nashville hospital September 4, 1991. Dottie died as a result of injuries suffered in a car wreck on August 30th near the Grand Ole Opry House. Dottie was the first female Country Artist to win a Grammy. She won for "Here Comes My Baby."

The Country Music Association was chartered by the State of Tennessee, September 5, 1958.

Ernest Tubb, the "Texas Troubadour" died in Nashville, Tennessee, September 6, 1984. Inducted CMHF 1965, NSHF 1970 and the Texas CMHF 1999.

Charles Hardin Holley, "Buddy Holly," born Lubbock, Texas, September 7, 1936. Inducted R&RHF 1986, NSHF 1994.

Buck Owens played lead guitar on Tommy Collins first recording session, at Capitol Records Melrose Avenue Studios, in Los Angeles, September 8, 1953. The first song recorded was "You Better Not Do That." The single became Collin's first hit, reaching No. 2 on the charts.

Elvis Presley recorded "Good Rockin' Tonight/I Don't Care If The Sun Don't Shine" at Sun Records in Memphis, September 9, 1954. Sam Phillips auditioned Johnny Cash later that same day.

Rosie Flores, Rockabilly singer/guitarist, born San Antonio, Texas, September 10, 1956.

Billy Ray Cyrus' PAX-TV show "Doc" is filmed in Toronto, but the setting is New York City. While filming skyline footage of NYC on September 11, 2001, cameras were pointed at the World Trade Center when the plane crashed into the south tower. The footage was provided to government officials, and media outlets.

David Skepner, age 63, manager of Loretta Lynn, and Riders In The Sky, died of a heart attack September 11, 2001, after the attack on the Twin Towers, and Pentagon.

On September 11, 2001, The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) were scheduled to present Garth Brooks with their Golden Note Award, at a dinner with members of Congress. As a result of the terrorist attacks on America the dinner was canceled, and Garth was stranded in New York City.

Rodney Crowell's daughter Carrie lives with her mother Rosanne Cash, in New York City. Eleven-year-old Carrie was at school on September 11, 2001, when the plane crashed into the south tower of the World Trade Center, a mere 15 blocks away. Rosanne retrieved Carrie, unharmed, a few hours later.

Carolyn Mayer Beug, 48, filmmaker who produced several music videos for Dwight Yoakam, died in New York City on September 11, 2001. She was a passenger on American Airlines Flight 11 that was crashed into the World Trade Center by terrorists.

Johnny Cash, age 71, died in Baptist Hospital, Nashville, Tennessee September 12, 2003. The Man In Black has been inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame, Rockabilly Hall of Fame, Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, and the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame.

The new U.S. postage stamp honoring Roy Acuff as "The King of Country Music," was unveiled on stage at the Grand Ole Opry September 13, 2003. U.S. Postmaster General John Potter presided.

John Wayne Hill, singer/songwriter/guitarist/fiddler, born September 14, 1964. John is married to Nashville songwriter Susan Hill.

Jerry Lee Lewis married his second wife, Jane Mitcham, age 17, on September 15, 1954, prior to divorcing his first wife Dorothy Barton.

Randy Owen, Teddy Gentry, Jeff Cook and Mark Herndon "Alabama" were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame September 16, 2004.

The Country Music Hall of Fame displayed a new bronze statue of Hank Williams Sr. on the 75th anniversary of the singers birth on September 17, 1998. Hank Williams III, Hank's grandson, was the model that posed for the artist.

Merle Haggard recorded "Sing Me Back Home" September 18, 1967.

Gram Parsons died in Joshua Tree, California, September 19, 1973, from a drug overdose. A few days later, Gram's manager "Phil Coffman" stole the body from the local airport. The body was driven to Joshua Tree National Park by Coffman, soaked in gasoline, and cremated on the ground. Coffman was arrested, and paid a $300.00 misdemeanor fine, for the theft of the casket. The left coast has always found it extremely difficult to prosecute

Jim Croce singer/songwriter killed in a plane crash while on tour in Louisiana, September 20, 1973.

The George D. Hay Hall of Fame, in Mammoth, AR, inducted; Bill Monroe, Jimmy Martin, Conway Twitty, Ernie Ashworth, Jeannie Seely, George Hamilton IV, Jimmy C. Newman, Barbara Fairchild and Clyde Moody September 21, 2003.

Bobby Helms member of the Rockabilly Hall of Fame, appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show on September 22, 1957.

Dwight Yoakam met Buck Owens for the first time, at Bucks' office in Bakersfield, California on September 23, 1987. Later that evening Buck joined Dwight on stage at the Kern County Fair.

Harlan Howard, Cindy Walker, and Brenda Lee, inducted Country Music Hall of Fame on September 24, 1997.

WSM president Jack DeWitt fired Grand Ole Opry manager Jim Denny on September 25, 1956. Conflict of interest was the reason given for the termination. Walter D. Kilpatrick was hired to replace Denny.

Carlene Carter born "Rebecca Carlene Smith," Madison, Tennessee, September 26, 1955. Carlene is the daughter of Carl Smith, and June Carter.

The National Life and Accident Insurance Company, owner of the Grand Ole Opry, purchased the Ryman Auditorium, and renamed it the "Grand Ole Opry House," on September 27, 1963. The purchase price was $207,500.

Johnny Horton and Billie Jean Williams (Hank Williams's widow,) married September 28, 1953.

Jerry Lee Lewis shot his bass player Norman Bush, in the chest with a 357 magnum on September 29, 1976. Norman survived the gunshot, and "The Killer," fired him. The police charged Lewis with a misdemeanor charge, of discharging a firearm within the city limits. Sometimes Tennessee has a difficult time convicting entertainers of serious crimes. Sound familiar?

Dolly Parton, appearing on TNN's "Prime Time Country" on September 30, 1998, stated to the host that "President Clinton is a horny old toad."

Check out my entire Country Calendar at: www.talentondisplay.com/countrycalendar.html


Rockabilly Pioneer
Bob Luman - 1937-1978
           Bobby Glynn Luman was born in Nacogdoches, Texas on April 15, 1937. After winning a Talent Contest, judged by members of the Louisiana Hayride, Bob was invited to make a guest appearance on that show. Later, when Johnny Cash left the Hayride, Luman was chosen to replace him even though he was still in his teens.
           Luman signed with Imperial Records in 1957. Bob put together a band in Shreveport with James Burton on guitar, Bruce White on drums, and James Kirkland on bass. The Rockabilly classic "Red Cadillac and a Black Mustache" was born at his first Imperial recording session. In a short time Bob had his own TV show in Shreveport.
           Bob took the band to Hollywood to make the movie "Carnival Rock," and while there, he was offered a spot on the very popular "Town Hall Party" television show. Ricky Nelson heard Bob's band at this time and hired them away from Luman.
           After leaving Imperial, Bob signed with Capitol Records, and later signed on with Warner Brothers. Bob's "Let's Think About Living" became a hit on both pop, and country charts.
           When Bob moved to Nashville in 1964, he joined the Grand Ole Opry. The Opry was never the same after that. Bob was very hard to follow, after bringing the Ryman audience to a frenzy. Many old timers didn't like that at all, and they didn't try to hide it. Bob ruled the Ryman for a few years, and he kept all the seats filled every Saturday night.
           In the fourteen years Bob lived in Nashville, he charted thirty-seven records. "Lonely Women Make Good Lovers" was the best seller.
           We lost Bob Luman in 1978. He was 41 years old. I was Bob's opening act on some very exciting shows, in the late sixties, and early seventies. No one took better care of an audience than Bob Luman - and I sure do miss him.


Whatever Happened To
  • Johnny Ace
    died on December 24, 1954, back stage at Houston's City Auditorium. While playing Russian Roulette, the 25 year old singer shot himself in the head. His top 20 hit "Pledging My Love" hit the charts one month after his death.

  • Brian Epstein
    age 32, manager of the Beatles died of a drug overdose August 27th, 1967.

  • Mary Ann Ganser
    age 23, of The Shangri-Las, died n 1971 from encephalitis. Mary Ann sang on the hit record "The Leader of the Pack."

  • Marvin Gaye
    was shot and killed on April 1, 1984, one day before his birthday, in what police described as a family dispute. The gunman was his father. Marvin was 44 years old.

  • Rick James
    age 56, of "Super Freak" fame, died on August 5, 2004, of natural causes.

  • Rudy Lewis
    age 28, lead singer for the Drifters "On Broadway" and "Up On The Roof," was found dead on May 20, 1964, the night prior to the scheduled recording of "Under the Boardwalk." No arrests were ever made in what police described as a mysterious death.

  • Richard Manuel
    age 56, of "The Band" took his own life in his hotel room on March 4, 1986, after a concert date in Florida. He was found hanging in his room.

  • Dee Dee Ramone a.k.a. Douglas Colvin,
    bass player for the Ramones died as the result of a drug overdose, June 7, 2002.

  • Danny Rapp
    age 41, leader of Danny and The Juniors, died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound on April 4, 1983. Danny's hits were "At The Hop" and "Rock and Roll Is Here To Stay."

  • Del Shannon
    age 55, died in his California home from a self-inflicted gun shot wound on February 8, 1990. One of Del's hit singles was "Runaway."




    "All fame is written in ice, and eventually the sun comes out."


    Q. & A.
    (Name withheld by request) wrote with the following question.
    Q:  Bill how do we collect our royalties from satellite radio and Internet airplay?
    A:  SoundExchange Inc. has a website at: www.soundexchange.com that can help you with your royalty collection process. They will provide you with the required forms. You may also contact them by telephone at: 202-828-0120. Go get 'em pal.
    If you have a question (related to MUSIC) send your e-mail to:
    RockabillyCountryNewsViews@gmail.com.


    Country Music Classics
    If you're a fan of country music from the 1950's thru the 1980's, back when country music was REALLY country, then subscribe to Country Music Classics a free weekday email newsletter all about classic country music ... stories behind the songs - questions and answers ... win FREE CD's & cassettes and more! For your FREE subscription send a blank email to: Classics@countrymusicclassics.com With "SUBSCRIBE" in subject line.


    What's Happening?
    Keith Urban And Lee Ann Womack will Announce Nominees For "The 39th Annual CMA Awards" September 7th In New York City.

    Vince Gill will be inducted into the Tennessee Golf Hall of Fame on September 22, 2005.

    The GAC cable network will broadcast the 4th Annual Americana Music Honors and Awards on September 26, 2005, at 8:00 PM and 11:00PM EST.

    Dierks Bentley was interrupted on stage during a performance at The House of Blues in Los Angeles, on July 27, 2005, when Marty Stuart walked on stage and asked Dierks "Will you do it? Will you marry the Grand Ole Opry?" Dierks said yes, and will become the Opry's youngest member (29) on October 1, 2005.

    The Tennessean reported that Alison Moorer and Steve Earle were married August 11, 2005, at the Hermitage Hotel in Nashville.

    The James Burton International Guitar Festival was held in Shreveport, Louisiana, August 19-21,2005.

    Vassar Clements, age 77, a world class fiddle virtuoso and A-list studio musician, died at his home as a result of cancer on August 16, 2005.

    Hal Rugg, age 69, Steel Guitarist, died August 9, 2005. Hal was a member of the Steel Guitar Hall of Fame.

    Rufus Thibodeaux, age 71, a renowned Cajun fiddler who performed at the Grand Ole Opry with country music legend Jimmy C. Newman, died August 12, 2005, at a nursing home in Nashville.

    Stage Names:
    "Country Artists"
    Liz Anderson - Elizabeth Jane Haaby
    Tammy Wynette - Virginia Wynette Pugh
    Chubby Wise - Robert Russell Dees
    Conway Twitty - Harold Loyd Jenkins
    Sue Thompson - Eva Sue McKee
    Sunshine Sue - Mary Arlene Higdon
    Cal Smith - Calvin Grant Shofner
    Texas Ruby - Ruby Agnes Owens
    Molly O'Day - Lois LaVerne Williamson
    Jerry Naylor - Jerry Naylor Jackson

    "Hollyweird Heroes"
    Chuck Norris - Carlos Ray
    Stan Laurel - Arthur Jefferson
    Ray Milland - Reginald Truscott Jones
    Linda Lovelace - Linda Susan Boreman
    Sophia Loren - Sophia Villani Scicolone
    David Janssen - David Meyer
    Bob Hope - Leslie Townes Hope
    Peter Graves - Peter Aurness
    Dennis Franz - Dennis Schlachta
    Buddy Ebsen - Christian Rudolf Ebsen

    "Rock & Pop"
    England Dan - Dan Seals
    Fats Domino - Antoine Domino
    Joey Dee - Joseph DiNicola
    Elvis Costello - Delcan Patrick McManus
    Charo - Maria Rosario Pilar Martinez Molina Baeza
    Freddy "Boom Boom" Cannon - Frederick Anthony Picariello
    Elston Gunn - Bob Dylan (stage name used in early days)
    Weird Al Yankovic - Alfred Matthew Yankovic
    Rick Springfield - Richard Springthorpe
    The Singing Nun - Jeanine Deckers


    Did You Know?
    In May, 1924, Chicago gangster Al Capone's girlfriend was invited to appear on The WLS National Barn Dance. After her performance Big Al insisted that she be paid - she was, and as a result all of the entertainers were put on the payroll at WLS.

    Roy Orbison filmed "A Black and White Night Live" at the Coconut Grove in Los Angeles on September 30, 1987.

    Brenda Lee's home was destroyed by fire December 30, 1962.

    Three suspects were arrested by Memphis police for attempting to steal Elvis Presley's body from the grave on August 29, 1977. Elvis' body and the body of his mother were then moved from the cemetery to Graceland.

    Jerry Lee Lewis' wife Shawn, died of a methadone overdose at the couple's home in Mississippi, on August 24, 1983. They had been married for two months.

    Dick Clark's "American Bandstand" was broadcast by ABC-TV for the first time on August 5, 1957.

    Buddy Holly and Maria Santiago were married in Lubbock, Texas on August 15, 1958.

    Elvis Presley's divorce from Priscilla became final on October 11, 1973.

    Buddy Holly opened a show for Bill Haley and the Comets in Lubbock, Texas on October 14, 1955.

    Gene Vincent and the Blue Caps appeared on National TV for the first time on the Ed Sullivan Show November 25, 1957.

    The radio network show "Your Hit Parade" debuted on April 12, 1935.

    Otis Redding posthumously received a gold record for his single "(Sittin' on) The Dock of the Bay" on March 11, 1968. Otis was killed in a plane crash three days after the record was released, and never knew he had a monster hit.


    From The Wisdom Desk:
    A Holiday For Atheists
               The Barna Research Group conducted a study in 1999 that indicates roughly seven percent of the American adult population describe themselves as atheistic or agnostic. The United States has more atheists and agnostics than Mormons (by a three to one margin), Jews (by a four to one margin) or Muslims by a fourteen to one margin.)
               One of those atheists complained that Christians have their special holidays such as Christmas, Easter, and so on. The Jews celebrate Passover. "But we atheists have no recognized national holiday. It just isn't fair."
               "I have an idea," said the man's neighbor. "Why don't you celebrate April 1st?"
               NOTE to my friends in other nations: In America, April 1st is "Fools Day."

    Have a great September. God willing, I'll see you here next month. If not - I'll see you in heaven - won't I? --Bill Morrison


    "The gods we worship write their names on our faces." -Ralph Waldo Emerson


    Bill's Favorite Music Links:
    http://www.rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/index.html
    http://www.etrecordshop.com
    http://www.countryforums.com
    http://www.therockabillys.com
    http://rockabillyhall.com/BillMorrison.html
        http://www.clabranson.com
    http://www.countryweekly.com
    http://www.google.com
    http://www.roycost.com
    http://www.radiohof.org
    http://www.stararchive.com
    http://www.whodoesthatsong.com
    http://www.wsmonline.com
    http://www.ifco.org/links.html
    http://www.countryhall.com
    http://www.roysamazinglinks.com
    http://www.oldiesmusic.com/index.html
    http://www.twangtownusa.com/news
    http://www.dickshuey.com
    http://www.talentondisplay.com/countrycalendar.html
    Visit Bill Morrison's Country Calendar











    "August '05"
    Volume 25

    August 2005 - ©Bill Morrison



    Quote of the Month
    Quote: "You've got to walk and talk with God to go to heaven. I have the devil in me. If I didn't have, I'd be a Christian." --Jerry Lee Lewis 1957


    August Highlights
    Johnny Burnette, age 30, singer/songwriter/guitarist, died in a boating accident in California on 8-1-1964. Brother of Dorsey Burnette, and father of Rocky Burnette.

    Robert Zimmerman went to court and changed his name to Bob Dylan on 8-2-1962.

    Ivan Leroy "Little Roy" Wiggins, age 73, steel guitarist for Eddy Arnold/session musician, died in Sevierville, Tennessee on 8-3-1999.

    Kenny Price, age 56, the "Round Mound of Sound" died from a heart attack 8-4-1987.

    Luther Perkins, Johnny Cash's guitarist, killed in a house fire in Tennessee, 8-5-1968.

    Loretta's twin beauties, Patsy and Peggy Lynn, born Nashville, Tennessee 8-6-1964.

    Johnny Cash and Vivian Liberto were married in San Antonio, Texas on 8-7-1954. The best man was John's brother Roy. Marshall Grant, bass player for the Tennessee Two, loaned John the money to get to San Antonio for the wedding.

    Hank Williams Jr. seriously injured in a fall on Montana's Ajax Mountain 8-8-1975. It would take two years before Jr. resumed his career.

    Wyatt "Merle" Kilgore born Chickasha, Oklahoma, on 8-9-1934. Worked as Hank Williams Jr.'s opening act for twenty-one years prior to taking over as his personal manager.

    David Rogers, age 57, died 8-10-1993. His recording career produced 37 chart hits between (1968-1984).

    Opry Manager Jim Denny, called Hank Williams at home, and fired him from the Grand Ole Opry on 8-11-1952. Ernest Tubb was in the room when Denny made the call.

    Linda Parker, age 23, star of the WLS National Barn Dance, became ill during a show in Elkhart, Indiana. She was hospitalized, and died in the hospital of peritonitis on August 12th, 1935.

    Joe Tex died in Navasota, Texas on 8-13-1982.

    Gladys Presley, Elvis' mother, died in Memphis, Tennessee on 8-14-1958.

    Bobby Helms, Jingle Bell Rock/My Special Angel, was born in Bloomington, Indiana on 8-15-1933. Inducted Rockabilly Hall of Fame in 2003.

    Elvis Presley, age 42, died in Memphis, on 8-16-1977. Inducted R&RHF 1986. CMHF 1998.

    Charlie Rich's first SUN recording session was held in Memphis, on 8-17-1958.

    Elvis Presley was buried beside his mother's grave in Forest Hill Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee on 8-18-1977. Both bodies would be moved to Graceland later, after an attempt to steal Elvis' body from his grave. Attending the private ceremony at Graceland were Caroline Kennedy, Ann Margret, Burt Reynolds, John Wayne along with friends and family.

    Dorsey Burnette, age 46, Rockabilly singer/songwriter, died of a heart attack 8-19-1979. Brother of Johnny Burnette, and uncle of Rocky Burnette.

    Leon McAuliffe, age 71, Western Swing band leader and steel guitarist for Bob Wills, died in Tulsa, Oklahoma, 8-20-1988.

    Rockabilly Hall of Fame inductee Grant Grieves and his lovely wife Marcia, were married on 8-21-1955. They are celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary this month at their home in Hendersonville, Tennessee. Congratulations from your friends at Rockabilly Country News & Views.

    Dale Hawkins, Rockabilly singer/guitarist/songwriter, wrote and recorded "Suzie Q" born Goldmine, Louisiana 8-22-1938. Inducted Rockabilly Hall of Fame.

    Kitty Wells' single "It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels," became the First #1 hit by a female artist in Country Music history on 8-23-1952. The Grand Ole Opry management refused to let Kitty sing the song on the Opry, and NBC banned the song on their radio network because it was too "suggestive."

    Waylon Jennings was arrested for conspiracy, and possession of Cocaine, by Federal Agents on 8-24-1977.

    Bill Doggett's #1 single "Honky Tonk (Parts 1 & 2)" hit the charts on 8-25-1956.

    Wilma Burgess, age 64, died in Nashville, on 8-26-2003.

    The Louisiana Hayride presented its last performance on KWKH in Shreveport, LA, on 8-27-1960. The very successful program debuted April 3, 1948, and was known as "The Cradle of the Stars."

    Bob Boatman, director of Hee Haw, died on 8-28-1989.

    Charlie Feathers, pioneer Rockabilly artist, age 66, died in Memphis, 8-29-1998. Charlie was a favorite Rockabilly songwriter, of the stable of SUN recording artists. Rockabilly Hall of Fame inductee.

    Slim Whitman, and Billy Walker headlined a show at the Overton Park Shell in Memphis on 8-30-1954. The opening act was Elvis Presley and the Blue Moon Boys.

    Fan dancer Sally Rand, age 75, died in Glendora, California 8-31-1979. I met Sally in her dressing room one afternoon, at a nightclub in Rockford, Illinois in the 1960's. She was a true delight. During the World's Fair in Chicago where she performed forty-years before I met her, Sally was the most famous entertainer in America.

    Check out my entire Country Calendar at: www.talentondisplay.com/countrycalendar.html


    Songwriters Spotlight
    Thomas Wayne Perkins  1940 -1971

    Wayne Perkins was born July 22, 1940 in Battsville, Mississippi, the brother of Luther Perkins, Johnny Cash's first guitar player. Wayne attended Humes High School in Memphis, where a few years earlier Elvis Presley had graduated. While in school Wayne formed a group he called the De-Lons. Scotty Moore, co-owned the Fernwood Record label at that time, and he recorded the De-Lons. Wayne's second single on Fernwood, a ballad called "Tragedy" went to #5 on the national charts. This song became a hit again in 1961 for the Fleetwoods.

    Elvis recorded a song written by Wayne Perkins in 1960 called "The Girl Next Door Went A Walking." During the next ten years Wayne recorded on other labels, with other producers however he was never able to match the success he had with "Tragedy." Wayne's life ended much too soon when he was killed in a traffic accident near Memphis on August 15, 1971. He was 31 years old.


    News Notes
    A brand new Rockabilly Radio Show is scheduled to go into production on October 1st, in Nashville. The sponsors are on board, the host (my pal Billy London) is lining up guest artists, and I am looking forward to hearing the first broadcast. Being located in Nashville, is a tremendous advantage when it comes to booking guests on radio and TV. Bob Timmers (founder and director of the Rockabilly Hall of Fame) will certainly be invited to appear when ever it's convenient. That man has lots of stories to share. RCNV will keep you posted on all the details about this new show, as the debut date draws near.

    7 things you should know about Billy London:

  • 1. Billy London sang the original George of the Jungle cartoon theme song.
  • 2. Billy recorded and played with the Monkees.
  • 3. Billy was signed by Clive Davis to Columbia Records.
  • 4. Billy was signed by Les Garland to Atlantic Records.
  • 5. Billy has appeared on national TV with Stephen Bishop as a pedal steel and guitar player on Don Kirshner's Rock Concert, The Tonight Show, Saturday Night Live and a CBS special with Natalie Cole.
  • 6. Billy has sang our National Anthem for major league basketball and major league baseball.
  • 7.Billy worked with the cast of Laverne and Shirley during the 1980 season.

    Al Krivoy and The Fabulous Rockabillys had a wonderful month of July. They signed a deal for European distribution of their new CD, as well as a publishing agreement. I'll bet they'll be touring Europe in the near future, and once our European friends have the opportunity to see this Rockabilly group in person, they're going to love them as much as we do. Congratulations to Al, and the entire group. It's a wonderful thing to see good things happen to nice people.

    I had the honor of meeting Rockabilly Hall of Fame member Grant Grieves on the evening of July 19th in Nashville. My daughter and son-in-law John and Susan Hill, arranged the meeting, and were present at the Grieves' home for dinner, and a wonderful evening. Grant's son Dug, daughter-in-law Amanda, and their two sons were also present. Dug is one of Nashville's top session players, and produced Grant's latest CD. Thanks to Grant and Marcia Grieves for a wonderful evening we'll never forget. And by the way·congratulations on your 50th wedding anniversary on August 21, 2005.


    Q. & A.

    Scott Adamson writes from East St. Louis, Illinois:
    Q: Bill, I read your biography on the Rockabilly Hall Of Fame website. Of all the entertainers you worked with during your career, which one did you like the most, which one did you like the least and why?

    A: It isn't possible for me to answer your question Scott. Many of the artists I worked with I loved. A few I just liked for one reason or another. And there were a couple that were despicable. Go back to www.rockabillyhall.com/billmorrison.html and read it one more time. I believe I pretty much covered how I felt about everyone I worked with. But I would like to say something about Roy Acuff.

    I never worked with Mr. Acuff on the road. I did work with his son Roy Acuff Jr. However, I did spend some incredible hours with "The King of Country Music." Some times in Linebaughs Cafe on lower Broadway in Nashville, I would listen to his stories and loved them all. But most of our time together was spent in his Gift Shop/Museum, or in the dressing room he had in the back. That's where the Smokey Mountain Boys relaxed and prepared for their appearances on the Grand Ole Opry, when the Ryman Auditorium was the Opry's home. I treasure every one of those hours.

    Here's what I would like to get off my mind, and I'm grateful to you for the opportunity. There were some things that Mr. Roy and I disagreed on every time the subject came up. I had friends on the Opry that recorded music in the studios of Nashville, and they all used drums. The fans wanted to hear these artists sing their songs on the Opry, and they wanted them to sound like they did on the records. Mr. Acuff would have nothing to do with a full set of drums on the stage of the Grand Ole Opry·and he was the Grand Ole Opry, so for many years there were no drums allowed. I thought that was unfair to the artists and I told him so many times.

    He explained his position clearly, and was never shy about giving his reasons. The music being played on the Opry at that point in time was pure country or mountain, or bluegrass. Mr. Roy said if new instruments were allowed on the show, the music would change, the Opry would change, and it would have a negative affect on the artists that made the Grand Ole Opry what it was. Well, I thought he was very, very wrong. But Scott, it wasn't Mr. Acuff who was wrong, it was me. The rules eventually changed, and everything that Roy Acuff said would happen, did happen·and it was, and is, a tragedy.

    Backstage at the Grand Ole Opry is not a happy place these days. There are some of the old traditionalists back there, but they don't smile much anymore. And Scott, I wish I could tell Mr. Roy that I'm sorry. He was right. He knew what would happen. It wasn't all caused by a full set of drums being used on the Opry, but that was the beginning. Today country music in Nashville, Tennessee, is almost non-existent, and that absolutely breaks my old heart. Who's responsible? Country radio and the Greedy Gaylord Group of Goons. Watch what they're going to do to WSM, the Ryman auditorium, and the Grand Ole Opry. The parking lot at the Ryman auditorium has already been sold to a Bank, and will be used to construct a very large building on the property. It's all going to go folks·it's only a matter of time.


    If you would like to ask a question, (here we go again) send it to: RockabillyCountryNewsViews@gmail.com
    Please include your name, town, and state (or country) (or Institution).


    Before They Were Stars
    Gene Autry worked as a honky tonk singer in Tioga, Texas at age 15. By 16, he traveled with The Fields Brothers Marvelous Medicine Show, singing, acting, doing blackface comedy, and played the saxophone. After graduation from high school in 1925 he worked for the St. Louis & Frisco Railroad where he eventually became a telegrapher. Gene sang on KVOO radio in Tulsa, Oklahoma as "The Oklahoma Yodeling Cowboy" and was backed up by Jimmy Wilson's Catfish String Band.

    Mark Collie was born in Waynesboro, Tennessee on January 18, 1956. Mark was playing in bands by age 12, and moved to Nashville in 1982. Eventually his hard work, and talent, took him to MCA Records and producer Tony Brown in 1989.

    Jimmy Dean served in the Merchant Marines and the U. S. Air Force. Jimmy dropped out of high school in order to help support his mother. In 2003 Jimmy Dean received his High School Diploma from the Plainview, Texas School District.

    Mark Chestnut dropped out of High School to play drums in a rock band. By the time his first album had been released he had been singing country songs in the bars around Southeast Texas for ten years.

    Maybelle Carter learned to play the guitar (a new instrument in the mountains of Virginia at that time) when she was twelve. She developed a style of picking that allowed her to play the melody, and rhythm at the same time. Maybelle was Sara Carter's cousin, and she married A. P. Carter's brother, Ezra in 1926. The Carter Family was born in 1927.

    Webb Pierce worked in the Men's Dept. at Sears in Shreveport, Louisiana.

    Melba Montgomery sang with Roy Acuff's Smokey Mountain Boys, for four years.

    George Jones disc jockey in Texas, and a U. S. Marine.

    Eric Heatherly landscaper, house painter.

    Leon Everette served in the U.S. Navy and worked for South Carolina Power & Gas.

    What Ever Happened To:

  • Eddie Cochran
    best known for his 1950's hit, "Summertime Blues", was killed in a car accident on April 17, 1960 at the age of 21.

  • Mark Dinning
    whose only hit, "Teen Angel" was banned by many radio stations who called it "a death disc", died of a heart attack on March 22, 1986 at the age of 52.

  • Jim Croce
    singer/songwriter who recorded "Operator" and "Bad Bad Leroy Brown" was killed when his chartered plane snagged a pecan tree during takeoff on September 20, 1973. He was 30 years old.

  • Bobby Fuller
    24 year old leader of The Bobby Fuller Four who scored a huge hit with "I Fought The Law" was found on the front seat of his mother's Oldsmobile, parked outside of a Los Angeles apartment building on July 18, 1966. His death was ruled accidental even though gasoline was found on his body and in his lungs.

  • Thurston Harris
    recorded the Top Ten hit "Little Bitty Pretty One" in 1957, died of a heart attack on April 14, 1990 at the age of 58.

  • Doris Troy
    age 67, the singer of the 1963 hit "Just One Look" died of emphysema on February 16, 2004.

  • Junior Walker
    age 64, leader of the All-Stars on "Shotgun", "What Does It Take" and "Roadrunner" died of cancer on Nov 23, 1995.

  • Paul Williams
    of The Temptations, died of a self inflicted gunshot wound on August 17, 1973 at the age of 34. Williams had left the Temptations in 1971 because of poor health.

  • Jackie Wilson
    age 49, died on January 21, 1984, in Mount Holly, New Jersey, at the Burlington County Memorial Hospital. He had suffered a heart attack while singing "Lonely Teardrops" at the Latin Casino in New Jersey during a performance in 1975 and hit his head in the fall. Wilson suffered brain damage and required permanent care the rest of his life.

  • Raymond Peterson
    age 65, singer/songwriter "Tell Laura I Love Her" died from cancer on January 25, 2005. Elvis recorded his song "The Wonder of You."


    Did You Know?

    The first band Roy Acuff worked with was the "Three Rolling Stones."(1932)

    By 1961 Nashville had more than one hundred song Publishers, over 1,300 studio musicians, and fifteen recording studios. There were over 200 songwriters living in Nashville, and 1,600 professional singers and sidemen.

    Dwight Yoakam's first #1 song was the "Streets of Bakersfield," a duet with Buck Owens.

    Brook's and Dunn's album "Brand New Man," stayed on Billboards Top Country Albums chart for over five years.

    Johnny Cash turned down "Skip a Rope" because he thought the song would not be popular with country fans. Henson Cargill recorded the tune instead, and it topped the Billboard chart for 11 weeks.

    Minnie Pearl describes Red Foley: "Oh he was the best-lookin' thing. He'd wear a white shirt and a white jacket, sort of zipped up in front, kind of an Eisenhower jacket you know. And a white hat, black boots, black trousers, very tight; he had a good figure. He was a snappy dresser. Red Foley was snappy, that's the only word that describes him."

    Buck Owens and Harlan Howard started Blue Book Music Publishing in 1956.

    Jerry Lee Lewis filed for bankruptcy with over three million dollars of debt, and no assets in 1988.

    Jo Dee Messina began her 2005 tour March 16th in Las Vegas, and will complete the tour August 7th in Columbia, Maryland.

    The Glen Campbell "Goodtime Hour" featured guests, Merle Haggard, Buck Owens, and Johnny Cash on January 11, 1972.

    From The Wisdom Desk

    My First Love

                                I first met her in high school. She was older than I was and exciting. She'd been around. My parents warned me to have nothing to do with her. They claimed that no good could come from our relationship.
                 But I kept meeting her on the sly. She was so sophisticated and worldly. It made me feel grown up just being with her. It was fun to take her to a party in those days. She was almost always the center of attention.
                 We began seeing more of each other after I joined the navy. When I got a place of my own she was a frequent guest. It wasn't long before she moved in with me. It may have been common law, but it was heartbreaking for my parents. I kept reminding myself I wasn't a kid anymore. Besides, it was legal.
                 We lived together right through my military service, and into my early days in the music business. I seldom went anywhere without her but I wasn't blind. I knew she was unfaithful to me. What's worse, I didn't care. As long as she was there for me when I needed her (and she always was), it didn't matter.
                 The longer we lived together the more attached I became to her. But it wasn't mutual. She began to delight in making me look foolish in front of my friends. But I still couldn't give her up.
                 It became a love-hate relationship. I figured out that her glamour was nothing more than a cheap mask to hide her spite and cynicism behind. I could no longer see her beauty after I came to know her true character.
                 But old habits are hard to break. We had invested many years in each other. Even though my relationship with her made me lose a little respect for myself, she had become the center of my life. We didn't go anywhere. We didn't do anything. We didn't have friends over. It was just the two of us. I became deeply depressed and knew that she was largely responsible for my misery. I finally told her I was leaving her for good. It took a lot of guts, but I left.
                 I still see her around. She's still as beautiful as when we first met. I miss her now and then. I'm not boasting when I say she'd take me back in a minute. But by the grace of God, I will never take up with her again.
                 If you see her, just give her my regards. I don't hate her. I just loved her too much. Chances are you know her family. The name is Alcohol.           
                 Note: In 1948 my four-year old brother was run over by a drunk driver. He died in my mother's arms. I have thought about that beautiful, loving child, almost every day of my life for the past fifty-seven years. Drunk driving is the nation's most frequently committed violent crime. Please·don't drink and drive.

    Good Lord willin' I'll see you next month·have a great August.


    Bill's Favorite Music Links:
    http://www.rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/index.html
    http://www.etrecordshop.com
    http://www.countryforums.com
    http://www.therockabillys.com
    http://rockabillyhall.com/BillMorrison.html
        http://www.clabranson.com
    http://www.countryweekly.com
    http://www.google.com
    http://www.roycost.com
    http://www.radiohof.org
    http://www.stararchive.com
    http://www.whodoesthatsong.com
    http://www.wsmonline.com
    http://www.ifco.org/links.html
    http://www.countryhall.com
    http://www.roysamazinglinks.com
    http://www.oldiesmusic.com/index.html
    http://www.twangtownusa.com/news
    http://www.dickshuey.com
    http://www.talentondisplay.com/countrycalendar.html
    Visit Bill Morrison's Country Calendar









    "July '05"
    Volume 24

    July 2005 - ©Bill Morrison



    This months column brings to a close two full years of Rockabilly Country News & Views. It doesn't seem possible, but I know it's true because I numbered all of the volumes, and I've done the math. I'm fairly certain that next months column "Volume 25" will be the start of year number three. Thanks to Bob Timmers for all the work he has done to make the last two years go smoothly. Thanks to the readers from around the globe, for your questions and comments, e-mail, support, and assistance. It's all about you, the fans, and of course, The Rockabilly Hall of Fame and our sister site The Traditional Country Hall of Fame www.traditionalcountryhalloffame.com. It is impossible to separate the two genres. Rockabilly and Traditional Country were created, and performed, by the same individuals. I have never met a Rockabilly artist that did not play country music (for a living) at one time or another during their career. Thanks again for the past two years - I treasure the friends I have met, and the messages I have received, well - most of them, and I look forward to year #3. My message to you as we begin another year: Support our troops and their families. Look out for your elderly neighbors. Support the Rockabilly Hall of Fame. And - never forget, Jesus loves some of you:-)

    Quote of the Month
    Quote:   "The one genre of music that literally has me just baffled is country. What the (bleep) is country now? The corporate guys have moved into Nashville and destroyed the city. They have destroyed what was country music. I just look at it and I laugh. If you are a pretty good looking guy who stays in the gym six days a week and wears a big hat, then you are going to be a mega-star. These guys just crack me up. Record companies make these guys what they are and they don't have to pay any dues. Maybe I am just a purest at heart. Maybe I am just old school. You can take any of them guys and I will play circles around his (bleep,) any day of the week. A lot of the guys in Nashville wish they were Lynyrd Skynyrd." - Rickey Medlocke of Lynyrd Skynyrd


       July Highlights
    Eddie Bond, Country/Rockabilly/Gospel singer born Memphis, TN 7-1-1933.

    Ken Curtis born "Curtis Wain Gates," Las Amimar, CA 7-2-1916. Ken was a member of the "Sons of the Pioneers," and played "Festus Hagan," on "Gunsmoke."

    Scotty Moore called Elvis and asked if he would like to audition for Sam Phillips at Sun Records 7-3-1954.

    Tammy Wynette married her fifth husband, George Richey, 7-4-1978.

    The Grand Ole Opry moved from the Dixie Tabernacle, to the War Memorial Auditorium, 7-5-1939.

    Johnny Russell, Opry member, was buried 7-6-2001. The Pallbearers were Garth Brooks, Brad Paisley, Jim Ed Brown, Billy Walker, Porter Wagoner, Jack Greene and Little Jimmy Dickens.

    George Morgan, age 50, died in Nashville after bypass surgery, 7-7-1975. George joined the Grand Ole Opry on September 25, 1948, and was inducted into the CMHF in 1998.

    Marty Stuart and Connie Smith were married 7-8-1997. The ceremony took place on an Indian reservation in South Dakota.

    Carl Smith and June Carter, married in Merryville, TN 7-9-1952.

    Roy Acuff was seriously injured in a car wreck near Sparta, TN 7-10-1965.

    Merle Haggard and Willie Nelson's "Pancho and Lefty," album Certified gold 7-11-1983.

    Jimmy Driftwood, age 91, died Fayetteville, AR on 7-12-1998. Jimmy was a school teacher and songwriter. His Grammy winning songs were "Battle of New Orleans," "Songs of Billy Yank and Johnny Red," and "Tennessee Stud."

    Louise Mandrell born Corpus Christi, TX 7-13-1954.

    Marvin Rainwater appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show 7-14-1957.

    Aaron Tippin married Thea Corontzos at Trinity Orthodox Church in Nashville 7-15-1995.

    Roy Orbison's widow, Barbara Orbison, filed a lawsuit against Sony Music on 7-16-1998. The suit alleges that Sony underpaid royalties on both foreign and domestic record sales. The Twelve Million Dollar suit requests back payments, plus interest on money owed.

    Don Rich, age 33, of the "Buckaroos" died in a motorcycle accident in California on 7-17-1974.

    Elvis, age 18, went to the Memphis Recording Service, and paid four dollars to record My Happiness/That's When Your Heartaches Begin, on an acetate record 7-18-1953.

    Lefty Frizzell, age 47, died on 7-19-1975, after suffering a stroke. Lefty joined the Grand Ole Opry 1951. Elected NSHF 1972, and the CMHF 1982.

    Clay Davidson and eight members of his band and crew were injured when their tour bus crashed in Effingham, IL, on 7-20-2001. All were treated and released from a local hospital and immediately returned to Nashville for recovery.

    Jeanne Pruett joined the Grand Ole Opry on 7-21-1973. Pruett was the last person to become a member of the Opry, on the stage of the Ryman Auditorium, prior to the move to the new Opry House.

    Loretta Lynn's son, Jack Benny Lynn, drowned in Waverly, TN on 7-22-1984.

    The Gene Autry Show debuted on CBS-TV on 7-23-1950, and ran through August 7, 1956.

    Ral Donner's "You Don't Know What You've Got" (Until You Lose it) charted on 7-24-1961.

    Charlie Rich, age 62, died in Hammond, LA 7-25-1995. Charlie was found dead in a Hammond, LA motel room. Death was the result of a blood clot in his lungs.

    Gene Autry joined the U. S. Army Air Corp on 7-26-1942.

    LeAnn Rimes, age 13, recorded her debut album "Blue" on 7-27-1996. The album went to #1, and remained there for twenty-eight weeks.

    Gene Vincent appeared on the "Perry Como Show," 7-28-1956.

    Pete Drake, age 55, steel guitarist/producer, died Nashville, TN 7-29-1988.

    Sam Phillips, age 80, founder of SUN Records, died in Memphis 7-30-2003.

    Jim Reeves, age 39, killed in plane crash near Nashville, TN 7-31-1964. Jim was flying the plane. Also killed in the crash was his pianist Dean Manuel. Inducted CMHF 1967.

    Check out my entire Country Calendar at: www.talentondisplay.com/countrycalendar.html


    Where Are They Now:

  • Barbara Fairchild
    Barbara Fairchild, best remembered for her smash hit "Teddy Bear" retired from the music industry in the late 70's, after her records failed to have much chart success. In 1991 Barbara was booked on some shows in Branson, Missouri. Returning to the stage excited Barbara, and she soon became a full-time Branson resident. She now tours with her husband, Roy Morris, continues to entertain the Branson tourists, and has released some new material.

    You can catch up on all the latest news about this wonderful entertainer at: www.BarbaraFairchild.com


    Stage Names Of The Stars:

    "Country Artists"
    Charline Arthur - Charline Highsmith
    T. Graham Brown - Anthony Graham Brown
    Kris Carson - used by Kris Kristofferson early in his career
    Gail Davies - Patricia Gail Dickerson
    Don Everly - Isaac Everly
    Howdy Forrester - Howard Wilson Forrester
    Hardrock Gunter - Sidney Louis Gunter Jr.
    Jana Jae - Jana Margaret Meyer
    Pee Wee King - Julius Frank Kuczynski
    Christy Lane - Elanor Johnston

    "Hollyweird Heroes"
    Tom Yewell - Samuel Yewell Tompkins
    Shelley Winters - Shirley Schrift
    Trigger - Golden Cloud was the birth name of Roy Roger's horse
    Arnold Strong - Arnold Schwarzenegger's 1st film stage name
    Jane Russell - Ernestine Russell
    Brad Pitt - William Bradley Pitt
    Kim Novak - Marilyn Pauline Novak
    Demi Moore - Demetria Guynes
    Peter Lorre - Laszio Lowenstein
    Buster Keaton - Joseph Francis Keaton

    "Rock & Pop"
    Tom Jones - Thomas Jones Woodward
    Jan & Dean - Jan Berry and Dean Torrence
    Jimi Hendrix - James Marshall Hendrix
    Kenny G - Kenny Gorelick
    Ferrante & Teicher - Arthur Ferrante & Louis Teicher
    Gary U.S. Bonds - Gary Anderson
    Gene Vincent - Vincent Craddock
    Wolfman Jack - Robert Weston Smith (deejay)
    Richie Valens - Ricardo Valnezuela
    Gene Simmons - Chaim Witz


    Q. & A.

    Here is a partial list of questions I have received during the first two years of Rockabilly Country News & Views, that for obvious reasons never made the column. It's good to know that in a world full of hate, there remain some intelligent people, with a sense of humor, who refuse to live in fear.

    "Hey Bill, would you please tell your songwriter friends in Cashville, that love isn't something you go looking for? It's something you give. Now maybe we'll get some better songs."

    "In World War II why did Japan's Kamikaze pilots wear helmets?"

    "Can you tell me why prison officials here in --_____, use sterilized needles on Death Row inmates when they kill them by lethal injection? Is that a federal law or something?"

    "Bill, why is it that no matter what color bubble bath I use, the bubbles are always white? If you don't believe me come see for yourself. I live at _______________."

    "Will you please tell me how all those dead bugs keep getting into my light fixtures?"

    "Here's a WARNING for your readers. NEVER talk about your mother's cooking when you're eating something your girlfriend cooked."

    "My husband and I bank at __________. I was wondering why the law allows them to charge a fee for Insufficient Funds, when we obviously don't have enough money in our account to begin with? Are they stupid or what?"

    "You might want to pass this along to your male readers. Never in recorded history has a man ever been murdered by his wife, while he was doing the dishes!!!!!"

    "Once you're in heaven, do you get stuck wearing the clothes you were buried in forever?"

    "If a deaf person has to go to court, is it still called a hearing? I think that's rude."

    "My dad dared me to ask you, who was the first person to look at a cow and say, "I think I'll squeeze these dangly things here, and drink whatever comes out?" My dad is silly sometimes."

    Q: This next question was a second request from a 5th grade student in Iowa -
    A:"What do you call male ballerinas? And this time I need an answer that won't make my teacher mad!!!"

    And my all time favorite -
    "Mr. Morrison, if people evolved from apes, why are there still apes?"

    If you would like to ask a question, (here we go again) send it to: RockabillyCountryNewsViews@gmail.com
    Please include your name, town, and state (or country) (or Institution).


    What Ever Happened To:

  • Duane Allman
    Duane Allman, age 24, of the "Allman Brothers" was killed in a motorcycle accident on October 29, 1971.

  • Toy Caldwell
    Toy Caldwell, age 45, lead singer for The Marshall Tucker band on their 1977 million seller, "Heard It In A Love Song", died in his sleep on February 25th, 1993.

  • Billy Fury
    Billy Fury, age 42, Rockabilly artist from Great Britain, died as the result of heart and kidney failure on January 27,1983. Billy's "Halfway To Paradise" was his biggest hit in England, where he was a major star.

  • Karen Carpenter
    Karen Carpenter, age 32, died as the result of anorexia nervosa on February 4, 1983.

  • Dee Clark
    Dee Clark, best remembered for his hit "Raindrops" suffered a heart attack and died on December 7th, 1990 at age 52.

  • Brian Cole
    Brian Cole, age 28, vocalist/bass guitarist, with "The Association" died in Los Angeles, as the result of a heroin overdose on August 2, 1972.

  • Bobby Day
    Bobby Day, age 60, died of cancer on July 27, 1990. Bobby's biggest hit "Rockin' Robin" was released in 1958.

  • Alan Freed
    Alan Freed, age 43, the disc jockey who is often credited with popularizing the phrase "rock and roll" in the mid 1950s, died of cirrhosis of the liver on Jan. 20, 1965.


    RCNV Wants You To Know

    The late Hunter S. Thompson understood the music industry. From New York City, to Los Angeles, and Nashville in between, Hunter recognized the shady herd of industry insiders that would cheat, lie, and steal from the songwriters, and artists that made America's Music what it was. He knew about payola. Not only the payments to radio executives, deejays, and some of the "Chart" services, but he also knew about the underside of some of Nashville's print media. The sleazy folks who were always available, for a price, to record labels, or other Music Row blood suckers, who had some kind of agenda that always involved lies and half-truths. Hunter took his own life earlier this year, but he left us with this truth before he went away.
    "The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." - Hunter S. Thompson
    Nashville old timers will tell you, that if all of Music City's print media had been as truthful, reliable, and honest as the Music City News, Traditional Country Music would still call Nashville home. It's true, real country music no longer lives in Nashville, but the greedy herd of thieves, and pimps can still be found without much effort. Only now they prey upon those who pretend to be country. Ain't life grand?


    Did You Know?

    I recently read in "TwangTownUSA" about the Answer Lady. If you have a question about Country Music - Irene has the answer. Send your question to Irene at: AskIrene4634@aol.com

    Big Salt Lick was the original name of Nashville, Tennessee. Nashville was once the home of Country Music - but that was a loooong time ago.

    Harlan Howard once told Johnny Russell that he'd never make it as a songwriter in Nashville, because he didn't hang out at Tootsie's.

    Buddy Holly's song "Peggy Sue" was originally titled "Cindy Lou."

    "Southern Made Donuts" is the only product Elvis Presley ever made a TV commercial for. November 6, 1954 Elvis sang the product's jingle on the Louisiana Hayride.

    Billboard's record popularity chart debuted in 1922.

    Little Richard quit the rock 'n' roll business in late 1957. He decided, while on tour in Australia, with Eddie Cochran and Gene Vincent, that he was going to become a preacher.

    In 1956, Buck Owens recorded some Rockabilly songs, which were released under the pseudonym "Corky Jones," on the PEP label.

    Tom T. Hall wrote more hit songs in the 60's than any other Nashville writer.

    Tex Williams recorded "Smoke! Smoke! Smoke! That Cigarette" in 1947. The song later became Capitol Records' first to sell a million copies.

    Chet Atkins was the top executive at RCA Records in Nashville. He was always embarrassed about not having a high school diploma.

    Ken Nelson signed Wanda Jackson to Capitol Records. Wanda was a guitar virtuoso by the time she was ten, and at age twelve, she had her own radio show on KERP in Oklahoma City. Wanda joined Hank Thompson and his Brazos Valley Boys road show in 1954. Wanda toured with Elvis in 1955. Her first Capitol Records release "I Gotta Know," went straight to #1. International stardom came for Wanda after "Fujiyama Mama," made her a superstar in Japan. The rock 'n' roll stardom came with "Let's Have a Party," which was recorded during the same sessions as "Fujiyama Mama." It became a top-40 hit and a million-seller for Wanda and Capitol.


    Elvis' Vital Statistics:

    Born: January 8, 1935 in Tupelo, MS.
    Died: August 16, 1977 in Memphis, TN
    Blood type: O
    Height: 6'0"
    Weight: 167-250 1954-1970's
    Eyes: Blue
    Hair: blond at birth-dyed black
    Neck: 151/2 to 17
    Waist: 30 to 42
    Shoes: 11D


    From The Wisdom Desk

    I had another birthday recently. I didn't need another birthday, but I decided to have one anyway. Being closer to 70 years old than I am to 60, I have learned a lot of things in my life, and when you get old you have the time to share with others the things that you think are important. But alas - no one who is young enough to benefit from the lessons old age acquires, has any interest in listening. Well, lots of people my age read this column every month. I know that to be true, because most of them have corrected me (via E-mail) at least once in the last two years. So I'm going to share a few of life's precious truths with my old friends. They're the best kind anyway.

  • Almost none of the things I worried about when I was young ever happened.
  • It's hard to argue with someone when they're right.
  • People who read the Bible, and understand what they've read, never worry.
  • What happens to us is not important - it's how we handle it that's important.
  • There are always two sides to an issue.
  • It's taking me a very long time to become the person I really want to be.
  • Anger manages everything poorly.
  • You can teach yourself almost anything by reading.
  • If you allow someone to make you angry, they own you.
  • Never marry someone who has more problems than you.
  • Good health is true wealth.
  • If you can't forgive and forget, you can at least forgive and move on.
  • People always find time to do the things they really want to do.
  • All fame is written in ice and eventually the sun comes out.
  • You can do, something in an instant that will give you a heartache for life.

    I have spent decades morning the loss of some of my musical pals. I'm speaking about Roy Acuff, Dave Akeman (Stringbean), Grant Turner, Tex Ritter, George Morgan, Ernest Tubb, Bob Luman, Joe Heathcock and many more. Now that I am getting old, and experiencing failing health, I have come to know that my friends were really the lucky ones. Old age is an unrepentant thief - and we will never be friends.

    NOTE: Did you know that America treats their elderly worse than any other industrialized nation on earth? The wealthiest superpower in history, has millions of elderly citizens who must choose every month between food and medication. I have lost neighbors in recent years because they could not afford medical care - but like most of my other neighbors - I didn't know the names of most of these dead, elderly victims of our society. Our highest ranking government officials (in both political parties) are a disgrace to this once great nation. Both parties take money, from people whose job it is to see that the cost of drugs, and medical treatment remain at current levels. On the other hand, I've heard that abortion doctors who tear live babies to pieces in the wombs of their loving mothers, haven't raised their prices in years, and have no intention of doing so. It would seem that evil always has the means.

    Well, good Lord willin' I'll see you right here next month. If not, don't worry about it, I will have become one of the "lucky" ones. And someday, you could be a lucky one too - are you ready? Eternity is a long, long time. Have a "Happy July."


    Bill's Favorite Music Links:
    http://www.rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/index.html
    http://www.etrecordshop.com
    http://www.countryforums.com
    http://www.therockabillys.com
    http://rockabillyhall.com/BillMorrison.html
        http://www.clabranson.com
    http://www.countryweekly.com
    http://www.google.com
    http://www.roycost.com
    http://www.radiohof.org
    http://www.stararchive.com
    http://www.whodoesthatsong.com
    http://www.wsmonline.com
    http://www.ifco.org/links.html
    http://www.countryhall.com
    http://www.roysamazinglinks.com
    http://www.oldiesmusic.com/index.html
    http://www.twangtownusa.com/news
    http://www.dickshuey.com
    http://www.talentondisplay.com/countrycalendar.html
    Visit Bill Morrison's Country Calendar









    "June '05"
    Volume 23

    June 2005 - ©Bill Morrison



    Welcome to the Rockabilly Hall of Fame. We are very happy you stopped by. If you see something here that you like - tell a friend. This free monthly article is made possible by the contributions of folks like you. If you would like to make a tax deductible donation we would be delighted. Contact the Director at: Bob@rockabillyhall.com. Bob Timmers will provide you with details about how you can help the Hall of Fame. No donation is too small! As of this date - no donation has been too large! We are so easy to please because "You" make all of this possible.

    Note: Every month I receive questions about artists from every genre in the music spectrum. From time to time, you might find information here about singers, and musicians that you don't care for. If you see an artist here that you don't think belongs - don't read about them - move on to something that you enjoy. And then - don't send me a nasty e-mail, unless you also include your home address.

    Note #2: Please do not ask me to provide contact information (address and/or telephone numbers) for the stars. In today's society, providing the public with contact information, puts the artists and their loved ones at risk. When you tell me that you're related to the artist you're inquiring about, how am I suppose to confirm that? Absolutely NO information of that nature will be released by RCNV. No exceptions.


    Quote of the Month
    Quote: "Yes, sometimes I am two people. Johnny is the nice one, Cash causes all the trouble. They fight." -Johnny Cash answering daughter Tara's question - "Did you ever have an imaginary friend?"


    June Highlights
    Doug Supernaw was arrested for bail jumping and locked up in the Potter County jail in Texas, for the third time in the past week on 6-1-2004. He was arrested twice at a Ramada Inn in Amarillo. Once for marijuana possession, and later for Criminal Trespass. The bail jumping charge was filed by the state of Washington.

    Helen Carter, age 70, died in Nashville, on 6-2-1998. She was the daughter of Mother Maybelle Carter, and sister of June Carter Cash.

    Willie Nelson released his album "Who'll Buy My Memories - The IRS Tapes" on 6-3-1991. Money raised by the sale of this album, would go to the IRS to pay off the sixteen million dollar tax debt that Willie owed.

    John Hartford, age 63, singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist died 6-4-2001.

    Conway Twitty, age 59, died near Branson, Missouri, on 6-5-1993. Inducted Nashville Songwriter's Hall of Fame 1993. CMHF 1999.

    William A. Palmer, inventor of the magnetic tape recorder, died on 6-6-1996. Prior to his invention music was cut direct to the record.

    Claudette Orbison,first wife of Roy Orbison, was killed in a motorcycle accident on 6-7-1966. Roy was riding his cycle a short distance behind Claudette when she was killed.

    Vernon Oxford, singer/songwriter/musician, born Rogers, Arkansas on 6-8-1941.

    Jerry Lee Lewis paid for a full page ad in Billboard Magazine on 6-9-1958. The purpose of the ad, was to explain how he happened to marry his thirteen year old cousin Myra, six months prior to divorcing his second wife.

    Steve Sanders, age 45, died in his Florida home, from a self-inflicted gunshot wound on 6-10-1998. Steve had recently quit the "Oak Ridge Boys," after a fifteen-year association.

    Hank Williams debuted as a guest, on the Grand Ole Opry on 6-11-1949. He appeared on the 9:30-10:00 PM segment sponsored by Warren Paint, and hosted by Ernest Tubb. He sang "Lovesick Blues," and received six encores.

    Charlie Feathers, Rockabilly singer-songwriter, Sun recording artist, was born in Myrtle, Mississippi, on 6-12-1932. Member Rockabilly Hall of Fame®.

    The final broadcast of "The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour" aired on 6-13-1972.

    Patsy Cline was seriously injured in a car wreck on a Nashville street on 6-14-1961. Patsy went through the windshield and received a dislocated hip, broken wrist, and serious lacerations on her face, and cracked ribs. Patsy was unable to sing for the next eight months.

    Waylon Jennings, born Littlefield, Texas on 6-15-1937.

    Buck Owens recorded "Under Your Spell Again" at Capitol Records, in Hollywood, on 6-16-1959. The record was released on July 13, 1959, and became the first of Buck's compositions to become a country standard.

    Minnie Pearl suffered a serious stroke on 6-17-1991, and spent the remaining years of her life in a nursing home in Nashville.

    The L.A. Times reported, the following country music stars, were honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on 6-18-1998: Reba McEntire, Charlie Pride, Freddy Fender, Alabama and Patsy Cline.

    Lester Flatt, singer/guitarist/mandolinist, born Overton County, Tennessee, 6-19-14.

    Ira Louvin, age 41, and wife Anne, died in an automobile accident near Williamsburg, Missouri on 6-20-1965. Member Grand Ole Opry. Inducted NSHF 1979, CMHF 2001.

    Johnny Cash released his first Sun Records single "Hey Porter," on 6-21-55.

    The seating capacity of the Ryman Auditorium was increased, when the construction of the balcony was completed on 6-22-1897. The extra space was needed for an upcoming Confederate Veterans convention.

    Arkie The Arkansas Woodchopper, "Luther Ossenbrink," age 65, died in Marshall, Missouri, on 6-23-1981.

    Joe Sun's "Old Flames Can't Hold A Candle To You," charted on 6-24-1978.

    Jenifer Strait, age 13, daughter of George and Norma Strait, died in a car wreck on 6-25-1986.

    Elvis Presley gave his final concert in Indianapolis, Indiana, on 6-26-1977.

    Wanda Jackson released "Let's Have A Party," on 6-27-1960.

    Merle Haggard and Bonnie Owens were married on 6-28-1965.

    Brenda Lee released her first #1 record "I'm Sorry" on 6-29-1960. The song was written by Rockabilly legend Ronnie Self. Brenda received a gold record and was nominated for a Grammy.

    Bonnie Guitar and the Everly Brothers appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show 6-30-1957.

    Check out my entire Country Calendar at: www.talentondisplay.com/countrycalendar.html


    What Ever Happened To:

  • Sam Cooke
    Sam Cooke was shot and killed on December 11th, 1964, by Bertha Franklin, manager of the Hacienda Motel in Los Angeles, California. Bertha claimed she acted in self-defense after Cooke raped a 22-year-old woman, who escaped and ran to the Motel Office for help. When Cooke followed the victim into the office, he started to attack the manager, who then shot the singer. The shooting was ruled a justifiable homicide. Sam Cooke was 33 years old, and at the top of his career.

  • Tommy Edwards
    Tommy Edwards died on October 23rd, 1969, at the age of 47 after suffering a brain aneurysm. Tommy's #1 hit "It's All In The Game" was my favorite song in the late 50's when I served in the U.S. Navy at the Naval Air Station in Corpus Christi, Texas.

  • Tom Fogerty
    Tom Fogerty guitarist for Creedence Clearwater Revival, died on Sept 6th, 1990 of respiratory failure at the age of 48.

  • Bill Haley
    Bill Haley who helped start the early 50's rock and roll movement, died in his sleep of an apparent heart attack on February 9th, 1981 at age 55.

  • Bobby Helms
    Bobby Helms age 63, best known for his perennial Christmas hit, "Jingle Bell Rock", died of emphysema at his home in Martinsville, Indiana on June 19th, 1997. Bobby was inducted into the Rockabilly Hall of Fame in 2003.

  • Buddy Knox
    Buddy Knox died of cancer on February 14th, 1999, at the age of 65. He is best remembered for his 1957 hit, "Party Doll."

  • Clyde McPhatter
    Clyde McPhatter died of a heart attack on June 13th, 1972 at the age of 39. He had been the original lead singer with The Drifters before having solo hits like "A Lover's Question" and "Lover Please."

  • Roy Orbison
    Roy Orbison age 52, died of a heart attack on December 6th, 1988. Roy was one of America's all time greatest voices, and was Elvis Presley's favorite singer.

  • Johnny Burnette
    Johnny Burnette, age 30, drowned after a boating accident on August 14th, 1964. Johnny had hits on "You're Sixteen" and "Dreamin.'"

  • Harry Chapin
    Harry Chapin, age 38, singer/songwriter, died in a traffic accident on July 18, 1981.


    What's Happening?

    May 12, 2005 (Roanoke, VA) The Pepsi Cola company will again produce a Mountain Dew can panel for Roanoke's FiddleFest 2005, one of Virginia's premier traditional music events. In June, Pepsi will produce 1.5 million cans that will be distributed to the Carolinas, Virginia & West Virginia, Maryland and the D.C, southern Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Kentucky. The cans will display information on the July 28 - July 30, 2005 festival and include the names of some of the featured performers: The Grascals, The Randy Kohrs Band, Larry Cordle & Lonesome Standard Time, and Lou Reid and Carolina.

    For more information on FiddleFest 2005, please visit roanokefiddlefest.org.
    1-866-883-9466


    RCNV Music Firsts

    Gene Autry's first radio show debuted on WLS in Chicago in 1931. Autry was the best selling Country & Western artist, from the Depression through the end of WW II.

    Shelia Bibby was the first female executive to run a country music record label (Decca) in 1993.

    Samantha Burngarner and Eva Davis, were the first women to record country music. They recorded fiddle and banjo duets for Columbia in 1924.

    Johnny Cash met June Carter for the first time, backstage at the Grand Ole Opry, on the night he made his debut appearance, July 7, 1956.

    "Coal Miner's Daughter," the movie, was shown for the first time on March 4, 1980, in Nashville, Tennessee.

    Jimmy Dean's single "Big Bad John"  was certified gold in December, 1961. This was the first ever country single to be certified gold by the RIAA, (Recording Industry Association of America.)

    J. L. "Joe" Frank was the first promoter, and talent manager in Nashville.

    The Grand Ole Opry for the first time allowed a trumpet to be played on the show in 1945, when "Taps" was played to honor President Franklin Roosevelt, who died two days earlier.

    George Hamilton IV was the first American country artist to perform in Russia.

    Johnny Horton appeared on the Louisiana Hayride for the first time on May 17, 1952. Johnny was invited to join the Grand Ole Opry on several occasions, and he declined each invitation. His wife, Billie Jean, was Hank Williams Sr.'s widow, and she was not very happy about Hank being fired from the Opry in 1952.


    Q. & A.

    M. Clayton writes from Little Rock, Arkansas with the following question:
    Q:  I enjoy the information about all the music stars in your articles, but I have a question about the God you like to talk about. Where is he when our children are murdered in their schools along with some of our best teachers? It seems to me if he can't protect our little ones why should anyone think he can do anything else??? - M. Clayton
    A: Hi Mary, thanks for the question. The answer is simple; between the politically correct school administrators, the communist founded ACLU, the NEA, (teachers union), and the activist Judges with their own agenda's, God has not been welcome in America's schools for years. If you expect God to serve and protect your children, and grandchildren, then see to it that He, and His laws, are made welcome in their schools - the schools that you have built with your tax dollars. You pay the salaries of the above listed activists, with the exception of the ACLU (Satan pays their salaries.) If parents refused to bow down to the God haters in today's America, we would all be a lot safer. Mary, if you think things are bad in America today, you haven't seen anything yet.
    If you would like to ask a question, send it to: RockabillyCountryNewsViews@gmail.com. Please include your name, town, and state or country.


    Before They Were Stars

    Jimmy Bowen - worked as a teenage DJ, and played bass and sang with Buddy Knox & the Rhythm Orchids.

    Carlene Carter - a.k.a. Rebecca Carlene Smith, had her own band, the Yellow Submarines by age 12. She studied music theory at Belmont College, and took guitar lessons from her great aunt Maybelle Carter. Carlene is the daughter of Carl Smith and June Carter, her stepfather is Johnny Cash, her stepmother is Goldie Hill. Carlene started her music career as a member of the Carter Sisters. In 1988 the group recorded Wildwood Flower for Mercury Records.

    Bobby Goldsboro - attended Auburn University in Alabama.

    Joe Clay - a.k.a. Claiborne Joseph Cheramie, a highly rated Rockabilly artist, was discovered by a deejay from New Orleans. Clay cut a demo for Vik Records and was given a contract. The record took him to the stage of the Louisiana Hayride in Shreveport. Four decades later his songs were reissued on CD's, and Joe continues to tour the world from time to time.

    Buddy Holly - sang in nightclubs in, and around, Lubbock, Texas.

    Reba McEntire - received a degree in elementary education at Southeastern Oklahoma State. Reba competed in rodeos as a horseback barrel rider.

    Mel Tillis - U.S. Air Force baker, delivery driver and railroad fireman.

    Porter Wagoner - worked as a clerk in a grocery store when he was 14. The owner of the store sponsored a fifteen minute radio show that featured Porter, in his hometown of West Plains, Missouri.

    Trisha Yearwood - studied for her college degree in Music Business, and worked as a receptionist at MTM Records. She will soon become Mrs. Garth Brooks.

    Don Williams - oil field worker, bill collector and furniture salesman.


    Stage Names

    "Country Artists"
    Rosalie Allen - Julie Marlene Bedra
    Carolina Cotton - Helen Hagstrom
    Cowboy Copas - Lloyd Estel Copas
    Jimmy Dean - Seth Ward
    Leon Ashley - Leon Walton
    Hank Cochran - Graland Perry Cochran
    Kix Brooks - Leon Eric Brooks III
    Freddy Fender - Baldemar G. Huerta a.k.a. Be Bop Kid
    Bobbie Gentry - Roberta Lee Streeter
    Wynonna Judd - Christina Claire Ciminella

    "Hollyweird Heroes"
    Fred Astaire - Frederick Austerlitz
    Ernest Borgnine - Ermes Effron Borgnino
    Richard Burton - Richard Jenkins
    Tony Curtis - Bernard Schwartz
    Diana Dors - Diana Fluck
    W. C. Fields - William Claude Dukenfield
    Rita Hayworth - Margarita Cansino
    Cheryl Ladd - Cheryl Stoppelmoor
    Lee Majors - Harvey Lee Yeary ll
    Harry Morgan - Harry Bratsburg

    "Rock & Pop"
    Pat Benatar - Patricia Andrejewski
    John Bon Jovi - John Francis Bongiovi Jr.
    Vicki Carr - Florencia Bisenta De Casillas Martinez Cardona
    Eric Clapton - Eric Patrick Clapp
    Sheena Easton - Sheena Shirley Orr
    Julio Iglesias - Julio Jose Iglesias de la Cueva
    Patti LaBelle - Patricia Louise Holt
    Liberace - Wladziu Lee Valentino
    Mama Cass Elliott - Ellen Naomi Cohen
    Tony Orlando - Michael Anthony Orlando Cassivitis


    RCNV News Flash

    Thanks to Keith, at www.CountryForums.com for adding links to my Hall of Fame webpage and the RCNV page. I urge you to check out Country Forums. It is a discussion forum for country western music where fans and artists can talk all things country. It is located in Austin, Texas. Now who knows more about country than the folks in Austin? That's right, nobody.


    Did You Know?

    Elvis Presley, Tammy Wynette, George Morgan, and E.W. " Bud" Wendell, former Opry manager, were inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame 1998.

    Waylon Jennings, age 64, died in his sleep in Chandler, Arizona on February 13, 2002. Waylon was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2001. As a result of a long-standing feud with the Country Music Association, Waylon refused to attend the induction ceremony, and sent his son Buddy, to pick up the award. The Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame inducted Waylon in 1995, and the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame inducted him in 1999.

    In 1953, Rock and Roll was born. The Grand Ole Opry sold 243,721 tickets to the Ryman Auditorium Opry Shows that year. By 1960, as a direct result of the new genre sweeping the world, ticket sales were down 40%, to 136,520.

    James Brown made a guest appearance on the Grand Ole Opry on March 10, 1979. Roy Acuff was not pleased about that, but changes were in the wind for the once great WSM showcase. By today's Opry standards, James Brown wouldn't even stand out as being different.

    The Grand Ole Opry returned to the Grand Ole Opry House March 4, 2005. No longer able to fill the seats at the much larger Opry House in the winter months, the show has moved back to the Ryman Auditorium every fall for the past few years. The new Pop-Rock style of "not-so country music" featured at the Opry won't fill the seats anymore.

    Radio Guide magazine estimated in 1936, that country's barn-dance, hayride, and opry performers were a $25 million dollar a year business. 5,000 radio programs featured hillbilly music in 1935.

    Rex Allen Sr. born Willcox, Arizona, December 31, 1920. Rex, age 77, the "Arizona Cowboy," died on December 17, 1999. The singer/actor was accidentally killed in Tucson, when his caregiver ran over him with a car.

    The name of Bobby Bare's band was "Pulleybone." Jerry Lee Lewis shot his bass player, Norman Bush, in the chest with a 357 magnum on September 29, 1976. Norman survived the gunshot, and "The Killer," fired him. The police charged Lewis with a misdemeanor charge, of discharging a firearm within the city limits. Go figure.

    In 1932 A. P. Carter and wife Sarah separated, and Sarah would return to the group only for recording sessions, and major concerts.

    Johnny Cash and Vivian Liberto were married in San Antonio, Texas on August 7, 1954. The best man was John's brother Roy Cash. Marshall Grant, bass man for the Tennessee Two, loaned John the money to get to San Antonio for the wedding. John and Vivian spent their wedding night in Palestine, Texas.

    Jimmy Dean received his High School diploma from the Plainview, Texas, School District in 2003. Jimmy dropped out of high school approximately sixty years ago, to support his mother. Way to go Jimmy.

    LeAnn's first name is Margaret, her last name is Rimes, and LeAnn belongs in the middle. This young lady sings like an angel, but she doesn't play the fiddle.

    A reporter once asked Willie Nelson when he planned to retire. Willie's response: "Retire? All I do is play music and golf. Which one do you want me to give up?" When Merle Haggard was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame, he mentioned his plumber in his acceptance speech.

    The Kentucky Music Hall of Fame announced in 2005, that Naomi and Wynonna Judd, Sam Bush, John Conlee and gospel singer Dottie Rambo are among the people who will be included in the next round of inductees into their Hall of Fame on February 23, 2006.


    From The Wisdom Desk

    In his book, Hitler's Cross, Erwin W. Lutzer analyzes the Nazi agenda for Germany and how the German church responded. Here is a paragraph from the book:

    Since Germans had for centuries celebrated Christmas and Easter, Hitler had to reinterpret their meaning. Christmas was turned into a totally pagan festival; in fact, at least for the SS troops, its date was changed to December 21, the date of the winter solstice. Carols and Nativity plays were banned from the schools in 1938, and even the name Christmas was changed to "Yuletide." Crucifixes were eliminated from the classrooms, and Easter was turned into a holiday that heralded the arrival of spring.

    You will recognize some of the same changes taking place in America today.
    See you next month, Good Lord willin' and the creek don't rise.
    Support our troops, and their families.
    Do not support "not-so country music radio."


    Bill's Favorite Music Links:
    http://www.rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/index.htm
    http://www.etrecordshop.com
    http://www.countryforums.com
    http://www.therockabillys.com
    http://rockabillyhall.com/BillMorrison.html
    http://www.clabranson.com
    http://www.countryweekly.com
    http://www.google.com
    http://www.roycost.com
    http://www.radiohof.org
    http://www.stararchive.com
    http://www.whodoesthatsong.com
    http://www.wsmonline.com
    www.ifco.org/links.html
    http://www.countryhall.com
    http://www.roysamazinglinks.com
    http://www.oldiesmusic.com/index.html
    http://www.twangtownusa.com/news
    http://www.dickshuey.com
    http://www.talentondisplay.com/country calendar.html
    Visit Bill Morrison's Country Calendar
    www.ernesttubb.com







    "MAY '05"
    Volume 22

    May 2005 - ©Bill Morrison



    Quote of the Month
    Quote: "I just talked to Jim Denny (Grand Ole Opry manager) and they've agreed to take me back on the Opry. I got one date to play on New Year's Day and then I'm moving back to Nashville." -Hank Williams speaking to Justin Tubb in Austin, Texas, at the Skyline Club, December 20, 1952, (two weeks prior to Hank's death)



    May Highlights

    Wynonna and Naomi Judd moved to Nashville, on 5-1-1979. Their first residence was at the Music City Motor Inn.

    Sam Phillips, owner of Sun Records, signed Sonny Burgess to a recording contract, and recorded Sonny and his band "The Pacers," on the same day on 5-2-1956. Sonny went on to become a Rockabilly legend.

    Kitty Wells recorded "It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels," at her first session for Decca, 5-3-1952. The session was held at Castle Studio, in the Tulane Hotel in Nashville. Owen Bradley produced, Jack Anglin played rhythm guitar, Shot Jackson played steel guitar, Johnnie Wright played bass, and Paul Warren played fiddle on the session.

    Gene Vincent recorded "Be Bop A Lula," in Nashville, on 5-4-1956.

    Jenifer Gill, only child of Vince and Janis Gill, born 5-5-1982.

    Songwriter Otis Blackwell, age 70, died in Nashville, on 5-6-2001. NSHF 1986.

    Hollywood columnist Louella Parsons reported in her column on 5-7-1940: "Roy Acuff, young hill-billy brought here by Republic Pictures from Nashville, is suffering from appendicitis and will be operated on as soon as the picture is finished." The film, "Grand Ole Opry" was finished a short time later, but Roy had seen all of Hollywood that he cared to. He loaded the Smokey Mountain Boys into their touring car, and headed back to his beloved Tennessee. Upon arriving in Nashville, Roy was immediately admitted to St. Thomas Hospital, and the appendix was removed.

    George Jones was arrested by Nashville Police for DUI on 5-8-1982. The arrest was caught on film by a local TV cameraman, and broadcast around the world.

    Keith Whitley, age 33, died from alcohol poisoning in Goodlettsville, Tennessee on 5-9-1989. At the time of his death, Keith had a blood alcohol content of .47%. In most states, .10% is considered the point of intoxication.

    Willie Nelson was arrested in Texas, for possession of marijuana on 5-10-1994. A judge threw out the evidence and dropped the charge on March 23, 1995.

    Elvis bought his first home at 1034 Audubon Drive, in Memphis, Tennessee on 5-11-1956. Elvis paid $40,000.00 in cash for the home, which he shared with Gladys and Vernon.

    Brenda Lee appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show 5-12-1963.

    Dewey Phillips, Memphis disc jockey, born Adamsville, Tennessee on 5-13-1926.

    Buddy Holly's optometrist gave him contact lenses for his 20/800 eyesight on 5-14-1956. Buddy was not comfortable wearing them, so he wore the trademark glasses the rest of his life.

    Elvis Presley inhaled the cap on one of his teeth and was taken to a Los Angeles hospital to have it removed from his lung on 5-15-1957.

    Ray Charles was inducted into the Atlanta Celebrity Walk on 5-16-1991.

    The New "Country Music Hall Of Fame and Museum," opened for business in downtown Nashville on 5-17-2001. This magnificent $37 million facility is the Crown Jewel of Music City USA. The memorabilia is wonderful. The people who run the place aren't.

    The made-for-TV movie "Stagecoach," starring Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, Kris Kristofferson, Waylon Jennings, and John Schneider, debuted on CBS on 5-18-1986.

    Roy Orbison released "Ooby Dooby," 5-19-1956.

    Jack Cash, age 14, older brother of Johnny Cash, died in the hospital after a chain saw incident in Arkansas, 5-20-1944. John always believed his brother had been murdered. The teenager John suspected of killing Jack, disappeared on the same day Jack was injured.

    Toby Keith left the ACM Awards Show before it was announced that he had won Entertainer of the Year on 5-21-2003. Toby told the press that he and Willie Nelson went to the bus to write songs, that's his story, and he's stickin' to it. I'll guarantee you the smoke was thick inside that bus.

    Jerry Lee Lewis opened a tour in England on 5-22-1958. Against the advice of Sam Phillips at Sun Records, Jerry took his new bride along. When the English press discovered that Jerry had married his 13 year old cousin, before divorcing his second wife, the tour was cancelled, and his career was almost brought to a close. The Killer's nightly fee went from $10,000 per show, down to a low of $250.

    Misty Morgan of "Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan," born Buffalo, New York 5-23-1945.

    Taylor Ray Jennings, age 22, and his girlfriend were killed near Dallas, Texas, by a drunk driver on 5-24-2003. Taylor was the grandson of Waylon Jennings.

    Jessi Colter born "Mirriam Johnson," in Phoenix, Arizona on 5-25-1947. Married to Duane Eddy and Waylon Jennings. NO - not at the same time!!!

    James Charles "Jimmie" Rodgers, age 35, died in his Hotel room in New York City, on 5-26-1933. Jimmie was known as "The Singing Brakeman," and was the first person to be inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame 1961.

    Redd Stewart born Henry Ellis Stewart, Ashland City, Tennessee on 5-27-1921.

    Sonny Burgess, singer/songwriter/lead guitarist, and SUN Records artist, was born in Newport, Arkansas 5-28-1931.

    George Strait, Alan Jackson and Jimmy Buffett played a concert at Texas Stadium in Dallas, Texas on 5-29-2004. Between them, the trio has sold over 120 million records, including 80 plus #1 hits.

    Dolly Parton married Carl Dean in Catoosa County, Georgia on 5-30-1966. Dolly and Carl are still married.

    Johnny Paycheck born "Donald Eugene Lytle," Greenfield, Ohio on 5-31-1938. Early in his career, he recorded under the name "Donny Young."

    Check out the entire Country Music Calendar at: www.talentondisplay.com/countrycalendar.html



    News Notes

    May 5th is our National Day of Prayer. I'm praying for the peace of Jerusalem, all leaders in local, state and national government, and asking God to Bless America again (real soon). Send me an e-mail and let me know what you prayed for: RockabillyCountryNewViews@gmail.com

    Dolly Parton and Randy Kohrs, have been invited to perform their duet from Randy's latest CD "I'm Torn," on David Letterman's TV show. The date is pending, while the artists attempt to find a date suitable to both schedules.

    Tim McGraw returns to the concert trail On May 14th, immediately after he completes filming his new movie "My Friend Flicka."

    Vince Gill will be hosting the 2nd Annual Academy of Country Music Celebrity Golf Classic to take place on Sunday, May 15th, 2005, two days before the ceremony itself.

    Buddy Jewell's sophomore album, "Times Like These" was released on April 26th.

    Saul Holiff, 79, passed away March 17, 2005, at home in Victoria, BC, Canada. Saul was Johnny Cash's manager, and once managed The Statler Brothers and Tommy Hunter.

    Joe Carter, 78, co-founder of the Carter Family Fold, and son of A.P. & Sara Carter, died on March 2nd, 2005.

    Willis Emory "Tip" Tippin, father of country singer Aaron Tippin, was killed in a traffic accident on April 11, 2005. Mr. Tippin died at the scene·it was his 78th birthday.

    Trisha Yearwood was the featured performer at the 2005 HH Gregg Country Music Expo in Indianapolis on April 9th.

    Sony Nashville reports that the second season winner of the Nashville Star show, Brad Cotter, has been released from the label. There is no word yet from Cotter's camp on his future plans.

    On January 1, 2005, I reported in this column that we had lost 21 Country, Rockabilly, and Gospel artists in all of 2004. I can report to you that as of April 11, 2005 we have already lost 21 of our best. This will be one of the worst years in our history, due to the advancing age of our Rockabilly and Traditional Country favorites. With each passing year George Jones' question becomes more pertinent. "Who's going to fill their shoes?"  I have the answer folks· - Keith Urban, Kenny Chesney, Rascal Flatts, Big & Rich & Gretchen, Shooter Jennings, Larry the Cable Guy, and Hank Williams III. Will the last person to leave Nashville, please turn out the lights?



    Stage Names (Movie Stars)

    Yul Brynner answered to Taidje Kahn Jr.
    Mike Connors knew how to spell Krekor Ohanian.
    Kirk Douglas was born Issur Danielovitch Demsky.
    Stewart Granger received mail addressed to James Stewart.
    Don Johnson was Donald Wayne.
    Larry King came to town as Larry Zeigler.
    Veronica Lake was better than Constance Ockleman.
    Janet Leigh already had a terrific show biz name - Jeanette Morrison.
    Karl Malden wasn't so proud of Mladen Sekulovich.
    Marilyn Monroe a.k.a. Norma Jean Mortenson a.k.a. Norma Jean Baker.


    Q. & A.

    Leslie Leingang writes from Salt Lake City, Utah, with the following question:

    Q:  I love to sing.  I go to karaoke all the time and I have people coming up to me and telling me how good I am.  I want to be a country singer, but I have no idea how to get into the industry.  Any advice?
    Thank you, Leslie Leingang, SLC, Utah

    A: Hi Leslie, thanks for the question. I will need some additional information in order to provide you with a suitable answer.
    1.  How old are you? Record companies sign young singers to contracts.

    2.  Marital status:  Single/Married/Divorced

    3.  Do you have children? If not, do you want children some day? Would it bother you not to be around to see them grow up?

    4.  How many instruments do you play?

    5.  Are you able to write your own material?

    6.  Could you handle being away from home 200-300 days per year?

    7.  Is your privacy important to you?

    8. Are you willing to make sacrifices in order to build a career?

    9. Are you willing to impose sacrifices on your loved ones, in order to build your career?

    10. If married, would you trust your spouse to be alone 200-300 days per year? Would your spouse trust you out on the road for the same period of time?

    11. What is the condition of your credit at this point in time?

    12. Are you willing to have your credit destroyed in order to find fame as a singer?

    13. Do you handle criticism and rejection well?

    14. Do you handle drunks and stalkers well?

    15. Can you live on a bus for weeks at a time?

    16. What is the name of your band? Karaoke doesn't cut it in Music City.

    17. Do you know where you can hire a band that sounds great ... and meet the weekly payroll, even if you can't always find work?

    18. Do you own a sound system? How much can you afford to spend on a bus?

    19. Can you smile and be polite to fans, when you're so tired and sore from weeks of travel that you are totally miserable? Would you stay after the show and sign autographs and pose for pictures with the fans, for as long as it takes?

    20. Do you have a substance abuse problem? Do you want one?

    21. If signed to a recording contract, would you be willing to let someone else pick the songs your going to record?

    22. If the record company decides they are going to spend over one hundred thousand dollars to record and promote your CD, would you agree to that? Did you know that money comes out of your share?

    23. Would it bother you if your first CD went gold, and the company didn't renew your recording contract?

    24. How many miles would you be willing to travel daily between show dates? 400? 600? 800?

    25. If you have a #1 hit every year for ten consecutive years, would it bother you not to win any awards? Would it bother you to find out that industry politics decides the majority of music award show winners?

    26. What type of venues are you willing to perform in? Casino? Night Club? Theater? Prisons? Tavern? Honky Tonk? Tent? Hay wagon? Biker convention?

    27. Do you have someone you can trust to be your personal manager? Road manager? Booking agent? Publicist? Bus driver? Accountant? Souvenir vender. Sound man? Record distributor? Insurance agent. Band leader? Song plugger? Stage crew? Attorney?

    28. If you sold 100,000,000 CD's in your career and country radio wouldn't play your music after you turned 40 ... could you handle it?

    29. Would you be willing to share the stage with artists who expose more body parts than they do talent?

    30. Could you live in a city like Nashville, that has forgotten what Traditional Country is, and what real country music sounds like?

    31. There are many great singers in Nashville, who have been unable to get a record deal for many years. After you move to Nashville from Salt Lake City, how many years are you willing to invest in trying to establish you country music career?

    32. Now...tell me again why you think you want to become a country music singer?

    Note: Leslie did not respond to my questions. If you would like to ask a question, send it to: RockabillyCountryNewsViews@gmail.com. Please include your name, town, and state or country.



    Before They Were Stars

    The Big Bopper born Jiles Perry Richardson Jr., worked as a deejay at KTRM radio in Beaumont, Texas. He quit the radio station in December 1958, in order to play show dates promoting his hit "Chantilly Lace." Two months later he died in a plane crash with Buddy Holly. J. P. wrote the George Jones hit White Lightnin'.

    James Burton was a staff musician at the Louisiana Hayride when he was 14 years old. At 15, James co-wrote "Suzy-Q" with Dale Hawkins, and played on the session.

    Rosanne Cash grew up in California, living with her mother Vivian Liberto, who divorced Rosanne's father Johnny Cash. After graduation from High School, Rosanne moved to Music City and worked behind the scenes for the Johnny Cash Show, in the wardrobe department. Rosanne Cash has had eleven #1 country songs.

    Hank Cochran born Garland Perry Cochran in Isola, Mississippi. He spent a portion of his childhood in an orphanage in Memphis. He and future Rockabilly star Eddie Cochran (no relation) formed a team after Hank moved to California. Hank was one of the premier songwriters of the 60's, and will be remembered for that talent, more than any other.

    Larry & Lorrie the "Collins Kids" were born in 1940's Oklahoma. The family moved to Southern California in the early 50's, and Larry teamed up with his sister Lorrie, to form the "Collins Kids." They were regulars on the Town Hall Party TV show, hosted by Tex Ritter. While traveling with the Johnny Cash Show, Lorrie met Stu Carnall, and they were married in December 1959. Lorrie retired in 1961 after the birth of her child.

    Buck Owens  was a Western Union messenger boy during WWII and loaded and unloaded fruit trucks. Buck also worked as a session musician in Los Angeles.



    Sharing Some E-mail

    Last month I was asked "Bill, you must receive some pretty interesting e-mails every month from around the globe, why don't you share some of them from time to time? Well, I couldn't think of a good reason not to, so here we go:

    Rip Wilson wrote to say hello last month. Rip was Bob Luman's last lead guitar player. (James Burton was Bob's first lead guitar player). Rip, who still lives in Nashville, is originally from Ashville, NC, and like the fine fellow that he is, Rip is going to help me locate the members of Bob Luman's family. Thanks pal.

    Roy Cost, member of the Rockabilly Hall of Fame, sent me copies of articles from the April issue of "Boppin' Around" the leading Dutch/Belgian Rock & Roll magazine. Yours truly, along with Roy Cost, and Ray Price were featured in articles written by Henri Smeets, along with some very old photographs. You can meet Roy Cost at: www.roycost.com.

    Nol Voorst from Maastricht, Netherlands is my friend, and European representative in all music matters. Nol wrote to report on a CD project he is working on. Nol is responsible for the article that Henri Smeets wrote in last months issue of Boppin' Around. Bob Timmers, Director of the Rockabilly Hall of Fame, is the only man I know who has done more to promote Rockabilly music around the world than Nol Voorst. Thanks to Nol and his wonderful wife Wies, for all they have done for American entertainers in Europe.

    Stan Hitchcock wrote last month to thank me for a poem "My Sin Killed This Man" that I sent him for Easter. Stan was one of my hero's when I moved to Nashville so many decades ago. A great entertainer and singer, and best of all he is a fine Christian man that I am proud to call my friend. You can meet Stan Hitchcock at: www.HitchcockCountry.com. Don't tell him that I mentioned his 69th birthday was a few short weeks ago. Everett Corbin former editor of the Nashville based "Music City News" and owner of Corbin Music & Corbin Records, wrote to tell me that Vernon Oxford will be performing at the "Jamboree on the Mountain" festival, in Monteagle, Tennessee, on May 6th, 7th and 8th. For more information on this world famous outing, go to Colonel Buster Doss' website: www.JamboreeOnTheMountain.com. The show will present over 150 Country, Gospel, and Americana acts. Oh yes, I forgot to mention that my friend Everett Corbin has been inducted into the America's Old-Time Country Music Hall of Fame, and is the author of a wonderful book entitled "Storm over Nashville: A Case Against Modern Country Music."  Everett knows more about Traditional country music than any one I have ever known.

    Al Krivoy founder of "The Fabulous Rockabillys" Michigan's most famous Rockabilly band, wrote to tell me about the bands progress, and current projects. You can purchase the group's latest CD "Best of the Fabulous Rockabillys" at their website: www.TheRockabillys.com.

    NOTE: If the tradition of Rockabilly music is to continue, we must support the new young artists. This group is worthy of all of our support. Don't you wish we had some young TRADITIONAL COUNTRY singers on the way up??? Me too·but where could they find work?



    From The Wisdom Desk

    Wisdom: The ability to properly apply knowledge. All wisdom comes from God. The following wisdom takes the form of a shoe. Written with care, especially for you.

    Find the good and applaud.
    Faith + nothing = salvation.
    Money doesn't love you back.
    The worst sin of all - a wasted life.
    Jealousy is the jaundice of the soul.
    Like it or not, Jesus died for your sins.
    Your opinion of God measures you not him.
    When the barn is full, man can live without God.
    Pride and vanity are like poison to the spirit of wisdom.
    Life's burdens aren't designed to break us, but to bend us toward God.
    The fool has no desire to learn, but desires only to air his personal opinions.
    No one can make you unhappy, unless you allow them to make you unhappy.
    One act of kindness may teach more about the love of God than many sermons.
    Your talents are a gift from God. What you do with them is your gift back to God.
    He that thinks by the inch, and speaks by the yard, should be kicked by the foot.
    Keep a large cemetery in your back yard in which to bury the faults of your friends.
    Worry, is nothing less than unbelief.
    Support the Rockabilly Hall of Fame.
    Bill's Favorite Music Links:

    http://rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/index.htm
    http://www.etrecordshop.com
    http://rockabillyhall.com/BillMorrison.html
    http://www.clabranson.com
    http://www.countrymusicclassics.com
    http://www.countryweekly.com
    http://www.google.com
    http://www.liveradio.netv
    http://www.roycost.com
    http://www.musicreview.com
    http://www.radiohof.org
    http://www.stararchive.com
    http://www.whodoesthatsong.com
    http://www.wsmonline.com
    www.ifco.org/links.html
    http://www.roysamazinglinks.com
    http://www.oldiesmusic.com/index.html
    http://www.twangtownusa.com/news
    http://www.talentondisplay.com/country calendar.html
    Visit Bill Morrison's Country Calendar
    www.ernesttubb.com







    "APRIL '05"
    Volume 21
    March 22, 2005 - ©Bill Morrison

    Quote of the Month
    Quote: "Hank didn't learn much in school. It was too bad that Hank, worn out by playing and singing all night, often slept through his classes in school. But in a way it turned out to be lucky. Too much learning might have spoiled the natural flow of his songs."
    ---Lilly Williams (mother of Hank Williams)



    April Highlights

    "Nashville Now," Ralph Emery's award winning show on TNN, was cut from 90 minutes to one hour, on 4-1-1992. After realizing their mistake, TNN executives returned the program to its original length of 90 minutes, on June 30th, 1992.

    Buddy Jewell born Lepanto, Arkansas 4-2-1961.

    Johnny Cash, recovering from a three week bout with pneumonia, learned that his older sister Louise Cash Garrett, age 79, had died earlier in the day at her home in Hendersonville, Tennessee on 4-3-2003. Red Sovine, age 61, died of a heart attack while driving in Nashville, Tennessee on 4-4-1980.

    The Jamboree USA radio show celebrated its 70th anniversary on 4-5-2003. The celebration aired on WWVA, Wheeling, West Virginia.

    Roy Acuff quit the Grand Ole Opry, after being refused a raise from Opry management on 4-6-1946. At the time, the Opry required members to appear every Saturday night of the year. Roy was being paid $15.00 per night on the Opry, and could make $100.00 per night touring. Mr. Acuff would later return to the Opry at the request of Ernest Tubb, and Opry management.

    Ferlin Husky, Buddy Knox, and Jimmy Bowen appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show on 4-7-1957.

    Jerry Lee Lewis and second wife Jane Mitcham were divorced on 4-8-1958.

    Tammy Wynette's Memorial Service was held at the Ryman Auditorium on 4-9-1998. The two-hour service was televised nationally on CNN.

    Wally Fowler debuted the first all-night gospel sing at the Ryman Auditorium 4-10- 1948.

    The International Bluegrass Music Museum re-opened on 4-11-2002, after 22 months, and 3 million dollars worth of renovations. The Museum is located in Owensboro, KY.

    Fan Fair debuted in Nashville on 4-12-1972.

    Roger Miller won five Grammys, at the Seventh Annual Grammy Awards 4-13-1964.

    History was made at the Grand Ole Opry on 4-14-1945, when a trumpet was played on the show for the first time. Taps was played to honor President Franklin Roosevelt who died two days earlier.

    Rose Maddox, age 72, of "Maddox Brothers & Rose" died in Oregon 4-15-1998.

    Janis Gill filed for divorce from Vince Gill after 17 years of marriage 4-16-1997.

    Tammy Wynette's children reached an out of court settlement, with the doctor they had sued for contributing to the singers death 4-17-2002.

    Tony Brown, Nashville producer and record company executive, was critically injured in a fall in Los Angeles on 4-18-2003. Brown was admitted to the UCLA Medical Center in critical condition.

    Crystal Gayle, Dottie West, Debby Boone, Emmylou Harris, and Tammy Wynette occupied the top five positions on Billboard's country charts on 4-19-1980. It was the first time women held all five spots.

    The Grand Ole Opry was shown on TNN for the first time on 4-20-1985.

    Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton performed their last concert together in Salina, Kansas, on 4-21-1974.

    Glen Campbell, singer/songwriter/guitarist/actor, "The Rhinestone Cowboy," born Delight, Arkansas, on 4-22-1936. Hosted the Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour (1968-1972).

    The Library of Congress honored Johnny Cash with their Living Legend award on 4-23-2000.

    Brenda Lee and Ronnie Shacklett were married on 4-24-1963.

    Willie Nelson performed for President Carter, at the White House, 4-25-1978.

    Hank Williams made his only network television appearance, on the Kate Smith Show on 2-26-1952. Hank sang "Hey Good lookin'."

    The Opryland USA theme park debuted in Nashville, on 4-27-1971.

    Ken Curtis, age 74, "Sons Of The Pioneers," and "Gun smoke," died Fresno, California, on 4-28-1991.

    Justin Tubb and Goldie Hill recorded "Lookin' Back To See" 4-29-1954.

    Curly Chalker, age 66, "Harold Lee Chalker" steel guitarist, died at a nursing home in Nashville, on 4-30-1998. Curly was Inducted into the Steel Guitar Hall of Fame.



    RCNV Songwriter's Spotlight

    Kris Kristofferson
    "It's where the stuff you feel in your heart is expressed, it's the closest thing to your soul. To me it's satisfying to express things that you feel and have other people say 'Right, that's exactly how I feel, too.'" --Kris Kristofferson talks about his music (from the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame)
                 Born June 22, 1936, in Brownsville, Texas. His father was a U.S. Air Force General.
                 Attended college in California, and after earning a Rhodes Scholarship, studied in England at Oxford University. While in England, Kris performed under the name "Kris Carson" and signed with Britain's Top Rank Records. After graduation Kris joined the Air Force. Captain Kris Kristofferson resigned his commission, and turned down an offer to teach at the Military Academy in order to become a songwriter. He moved to Nashville, and took a job as janitor at Capitol Records, and also worked as a commercial helicopter pilot from time to time.
                 Signed a recording contract with Monument Records in 1969.
                 Kris had two children with his first wife Fran Beir, and one daughter with second wife Rita Coolidge. Rita divorced Kris in 1980, citing Kris' alcohol addiction as the reason.
                 Prior to her death, Kris dated Janis Joplin and wrote one of her biggest hits "Me and Bobby McGee." The song was recorded by more than 50 artists.
                 Kris had heart bypass surgery in 1999, and is now married to Lisa Meyers, they have five children.
                 Inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame 1977.
                 Received a Golden Globe Award in 1977 for "Best Actor" in the film "A Star Is Born."
                 Kris continues to perform at concert dates across America.



    News Notes

    An American Airlines flight from St. Martin to Miami experienced electrical failure and the engines were completely shut down, requiring an emergency landing on February 21, 2005. Passengers on the plane included Billy Ray Cyrus, songwriters Scotty Emerick, Jeffery Steele, Chuck Cannon, and Bob DiPiero and video director Shawn Silva. The Nelson twins, sons of Ricky Nelson who died in a plane crash December 31, 1985, were also on board.  No injuries were reported.

    Nashville songwriter Hank Cochran, age 69, underwent triple by-pass surgery at Nashville's Centennial Medical Center on March 15th. At last report Hank was recovering well. Get well messages may be left at: www.HankCochran.com.

    Bluegrass legend Jimmy Martin is back in the hospital for treatment in his battle with bladder cancer. Prayers for Jimmy and his family are in order.

    Chris LeDoux lost his battle with cancer on March 9th, 2005, at the Wyoming Medical Center in Casper. The singing rodeo champion is survived by wife Peggy, and their five children.

    World class fiddle player Vassar Clements was diagnosed with small cell lung cancer on March 11, 2005. Fans and friends are invited to leave messages for Vassar at his website: www.VassarClements.com.



    Q. & A.

    Gerri T. writes from Atlanta, Georgia with the following question:
    Q: My mother thinks she danced with you one Saturday night in Athens, Georgia. She went to college there, and graduated in the early 70's. She said you and George Morgan did a show at a local hotel and that's where you danced. Does she remember correctly?
    A: It couldn't have been me Gerri, I was married at that time. One of the guys in the band was single. Some folks say he looked a lot like me.
    If you have a question (related to MUSIC) send your e-mail to: RockabillyCountryNewsViews@gmail.com.



    Before They Were Stars

    Chely Wright was born October 25, 1970, in Kansas City, Missouri. Chely grew up in Wellsville, Kansas, and was singing in a band by age 11. Chely formed her own band in High School, and moved to Nashville after graduation, and was hired to perform in one of the shows at Opryland's theme park.

    Shania Twain worked with her father planting trees at Canadian logging camps.

    Jean Shepard sang and played upright bass in "The Melody Ranch Girls" band.

    Brad Paisley, formed his first band "Brad Paisley & The C Notes" at age 10. By age 15 he became a regular member of the WWVA Wheeling Jamboree. At age 16 Brad was the opening act for the Judds.

    Bonnie Owens, sang with a band called "Mac's Skillet Lickers."

    Jimmy C. Newman worked as a welder's helper in a defense plant, during WWII.

    Jo Dee Messina started singing in bars at an early age. By age 16 she formed her first band, "The Jo Dee Messina Band."



    Stage Names

  • Deborah Allen once answered to Deborah Lynn Thurmond.
  • Mandy Barnett is Amanda Carol Barnett.
  • Lightnin' Chance receives mail addressed to Floyd Taylor Chance.
  • Skeeter Davis was born Mary Frances Penick.
  • Skip Ewing is Donald Ralph Ewing.
  • Mary Ford was born Iris Colleen Summers, and eventually became (Mrs. Les Paul.)
  • Goldie Hill began life as Argolda Voncile, but eventually found happiness as Mrs. Carl Smith.



    RCNV News Flash

    Dolly Parton was honored by Country Radio Broadcasters recently with their Career Achievement Award. After receiving the award Dolly looked at the radio executives and dee jays in the audience and said, "I think of radio like a great lover. You were good to me. You bought me nice things, and then you dumped my ass for a younger woman." The thousands of radio people in the audience cheered, and gave Dolly a standing ovation. [Did you know that six or seven men, program 85% of what country radio stations in the U.S. play on the air?] They not only control air play, but now dictate to Music Row Record companies what type of music should be recorded. The record companies in Nashville, know exactly what kind of music will be played on the radio and what will be rejected because It's "TOO COUNTRY." Friends, if you own your own business or do any advertising for any reason·please don't advertise on (so called) country music radio stations, unless they actually play Traditional Country music.

    Billy Joe Shaver and Joanne Gray will be married in Texas on April 8, 2005. Joanne is a hospice nurse. Kinky Friedman founder of The Texas Jewboys, and friend of Billy Joe's will be a part of the ceremony.  Billy Joe Shaver's biography "Honky Tonk Hero" hit the bookstores last month. You'll want this book folks.

    The following artists will be inducted into the Kentucky Music Hall of Fame in 2006. The Judds, Sam Bush (mandolinist), Grand Ole Opry star John Conlee, Dottie Rambo (Gospel music legend), and Mary Travers a member of the group Peter, Paul and Mary. Lionel Hampton, Todd Duncan and John Jacob Niles will be inducted posthumously. The Kentucky Music Hall of Fame is located in Lexington, Kentucky, and inducts new members every two years.

    Randy Kohrs' latest CD "I'm Torn," on Lonesome Day Records, cracked the top ten on Bluegrass charts in March. This CD features a duet with Dolly Parton, and five songs co-written by Randy, and my all-time favorite songwriter "Susan Hill."

    Wilma Lee Cooper was recently honored by the Grand Ole Opry as she celebrated her 48th anniversary as an Opry member. I had the honor of opening some shows for Wilma Lee and Stoney Cooper back in the 60's and 70's, and they were one of the best acts I have ever seen. Stoney Cooper died March 22, 1970.



    Did You Know?

    Owen Bradley, age 82, died on January 7, 1998. He was Inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1974. His funeral was held at the Ryman Auditorium. More than any other individual, Mr. Bradley was responsible for turning Nashville into the country music recording capital.

    Marvin Douglas Brown, age 53, died in Brushy Mountain State Prison on January 8, 2003. Brown was one of two men sentenced to life in prison, for the murder of Opry star Stringbean, and his wife Estelle, on November 10, 1973.

    The Louisiana Hayride presented its last performance on KWKH in Shreveport, LA on August 27, 1960. The very successful program debuted April 3, 1948, and was known as "The Cradle of the Stars."

    TNN, the "Nashville Network" debuted in seven million homes on March 7, 1983. Originally scheduled to begin in October 1982, technical problems resulted in a five-month delay.

    Linda Gail Lewis, the younger, singing sister of Jerry Lee Lewis, was born on July 18, 1947 in Ferriday, Louisiana. Linda married her second husband when she was fifteen years old. Then #3, #4, #5, #6, #7, and #8. It's either the water in Louisiana, or the DNA in Lewis. The saga continues.

    Freddie Hart, born Frederick Segrest on December 21, 1926 in Lochapoka, Alabama. Freddie served in the U. S. Marines during WWII and was involved in the battles for Iwo Jima and Okinaw. Prior to stardom, Freddie taught Karate at the Los Angeles Police Academy. How fitting that this war hero would record a song called "Easy Lovin'" and watch as it took him to #1. Easy Lovin' was the CMA song of the year in 1971 and 1972. Where have all our hero's gone?

    Don Schlitz has written 24 #1 songs, including Kenny Rogers "The Gambler."

    CMT, Country Music Television, is owned by VH1 in New York. Record companies in Nashville, will not produce a music video for any of their record releases until CMT has been consulted. The reason·CMT will not play any video they deem to be "TOO COUNTRY."

    If you prefer country music from the 50's-60's and 70's, instead of what is being passed off today as country music, then join the 18,000 subscribers who read COUNTRY MUSIC CLASSICS, a FREE daily email newsletter all about classic country music from the 1950's thru the 1980's. For your FREE subscription, send a blank email to: classics@countrymusicclassics.com with "SUBSCRIBE" in the subject line.



    From The Wisdom Desk:

    The well-known social critic Dennis Prager, debating the Oxford atheistic philosopher Jonathan Glover, raised this question: If you, Professor Glover, were stranded at the midnight hour in a desolate Los Angeles street, and if, as you stepped out of your car with fear and trembling, you were suddenly to hear the weight of pounding footsteps behind you, would it or would it not make a difference to you to know they were coming from a Bible study?

    Other books were written for our information; the Bible was written for our transformation.

    Thanks for dropping by. Good Lord willin' I'll see you here again next month. If I'm not here - I'll see you in heaven - won't I?

    Bill's Favorite Music Links:
    http://rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/index.htm
    http://www.etrecordshop.com
    http://rockabillyhall.com/BillMorrison.html
    http://www.clabranson.com
    http://www.countrymusicclassics.com
    http://www.countryweekly.com
    http://www.google.com
    http://www.liveradio.netv
    http://www.roycost.com
    http://www.musicreview.com
    http://www.radiohof.org
    http://www.stararchive.com
    http://www.whodoesthatsong.com
    http://www.wsmonline.com
    www.ifco.org/links.html
    http://www.countryhall.com
    http://www.oldiesmusic.com/index.html

    http://www.dickshuey.com
    Visit Bill Morrison's Country Calendar







    "MARCH '05"
    Volume 20
    February 24, 2005 - ©Bill Morrison



    Quote of the Month
    Quote: "I recorded a song called 'I Fall to Pieces,' and I was in a car wreck. Now I'm really worried because I have a brand-new record, and it's called 'Crazy.'"
    -- Patsy Cline speaking to her Opry audience.


    March Highlights

    Merle Haggard was granted a full pardon by Gov. Ronald Reagan on 3-1-1972.

    The new Delta Music Museum Hall of Fame opened on 3-2-2002, in Ferriday, Louisiana. Jerry Lee Lewis, Mickey Gilley, and Jimmy Swaggart were among the first inductees.

    Harlan Howard, age 74, one of the worlds greatest songwriters, died in Nashville on 3-3-2002. Inducted NSHF, and CMHF.

    Minnie Pearl, age 83, longtime star of the Grand Ole Opry, died in Nashville, on 3-4- 1996. Inducted CMHF 1975.

    Patsy Cline, age 30, was killed in a plane crash near Camden, Tennessee on 3-5-63. Patsy was a member of the Grand Ole Opry. Inducted CMHF 1973. Also killed in the crash were Cowboy Copas, age 49, Hawkshaw Hawkins, age 41, and Patsy's manager, Randy Hughes, age 34. Hughes was flying the plane.

    Scotty Moore was finally inducted into the R&RHOF on 3-6-2000.

    Jack Anglin, age 46, of Johnnie & Jack, was killed in a traffic accident while en route to Patsy Cline's memorial service in on 3-7-1963. He was the fourth member of the Grand Ole Opry cast to die in the past 48 hours.

    Bob Timmers, founder of the "Rockabilly Hall of Fame," was born in Appleton, Wisconsin, on 3-8-1941.

    The Opry played their last Saturday night show at the Ryman, prior to moving to the new Opry House on 3-9-1974.

    ACLU member Natalie Maines of the "Dixie Chicks" told an audience in London, England, on 3-10-2003, that the Chicks were ashamed that President George Bush was from their home state of Texas. Her statement came less than a week, before the war in Iraq was to begin, and approximately six months before the Chicks stopped performing and recording. Natalie moved to Hollywood and is now a housewife and mother.

    Carrie Cash, age 86, mother of Johnny Cash, died on 3-11-1991.

    Ralph Sloan, age 55, founder of the Grand Old Opry dance troupe, the Tennessee Travelers, died on 3-12-1980.

    George Jones and Tammy Wynette divorced on 3-13-1975.

    Tommy Collins, age 69, singer/songwriter/guitarist, died in Ashland City, Tennessee on 3-14-2000. Inducted Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame 1999.

    Roger Miller won six Grammy's at the 8th Annual Grammy Awards on 3-15-1965.

    Seven members of Reba McEntire's band, and her tour manager, died in a plane crash near San Diego, California, on 3-16-1991. The crash was attributed to Pilot error. Musicians who died: Chris Austin, Kirk Capello, Joey Cigainero, Paula Kaye Evans, Terry Jackson, Michael Thomas and Tony Saputo.

    Tanya Tucker recorded her debut single "Delta Dawn," at Columbia's 16th Avenue studio on 3-17-1972. Billy Sherrill produced.

    Brenda Lee was inducted into the R&RHF on 3-18-2002.

    Tootsie Bess opened "Tootsie's Orchard Lounge," across the alley from the Grand Ole Opry, (Ryman Auditorium,) on 3-19-1960, and the legend began. Tootsie's first waitress "Wanda Lohman" can still be found at Tootsie's several nights a week. She has more inside information about Music City and the real country music stars, than any other individual. Next time you're in Nashville drop by Tootsie's and ask for Wanda, you will be amazed.

    Jerry Reed was born "Jerry Reed Hubbard," in Atlanta, Georgia on 3-20-1937.

    Carl Perkins and his brother Jay, were seriously injured in a car crash en route to New York City, for an appearance on the Perry Como Show on 3-21- 1956.

    Stoney Cooper, age 59, of Wilma Lee & Stoney Cooper died on 3-22-1977.

    Barbara Mandrell gave a farewell concert at the Grand Ole Opry House on 3-23-97. She then retired from the music industry, and moved to California to purse a career in acting.

    Toby Keith's father, age 67, was killed in a hit & run auto accident on 3-24-2001. The incident occurred on I 35 outside Norman, Oklahoma. The female driver of the hit & run vehicle was located and arrested.

    Bill Anderson was arrested in Wilson County, Tennessee, on a charge of Aggravated Assault on 3-25-2003. The charges were filed by Anderson's girl friend, Deborah Marlin. Anderson was released on $1,500.00 bond.

    Ralph Emery and Joy Kott were married on 3-26-1967.

    Red Foley recorded the first ever million-selling gospel song, "Peace In The Valley" on 3-27-1951.

    Rusty Draper, age 80, died in a Seattle, Washington, hospital on 3-28-2003. The singer/songwriter/guitarist, suffered from heart disease and cancer of the throat.

    Moon Mullican, "King of the Hillbilly Piano Players," was born in Corrigon, Texas on 3-29-1909.

    Gilley's nightclub in Pasadena, TX closed on 3-30-1989. A fire of questionable origin destroyed the structure a few days later.

    The Opry career of Kitty Cora Cline, ended on 3-31-1934, after she observed a traffic accident on a bridge crossing the Cumberland River while traveling to the Grand Ole Opry. The accident was so bad that Mrs. Cline (the first female soloist the Opry ever had,) vowed never to ride in a car again.



    RCNC "Firsts"

    Eddy Arnold had his first recording session in Nashville, on December 4, 1944.

    The Carter Family had their first recording session for Ralph Peer and Victor Records in Bristol, Tennessee, August 1, 1927.

    Patsy Cline made her first public appearance at age four, when she won a tap dancing contest.

    Dick Curless hit the charts for the first time with, "A Tombstone Every Mile," in March, 1965.

    Calvin Gilmore, star of the Carolina Opry, in Myrtle Beach, SC, appeared for the first time on the Grand Ole Opry on April 29, 2003.

    The movie "Rock Around the Clock" featuring Bill Haley, was shown for the first time in Washington, DC on October 14, 1956.

    Alan Jackson appeared on Ralph Emery's "Nashville Now" for the first time on April 1, 1986. At the time Alan was working in the mailroom at TNN.



    News Note
    Merle Kilgore, and Sammi Smith passed last month. I knew them both, and there are two more empty spaces in my heart. The list of Traditional country music artists who have left us continues to grow, and most will be gone within the next 10 -15 years. As the stars of country music leave us, it is only natural that the fans go too. The stars can't be replaced. There is no minor league system for training the young Traditional country artists any more. And if there was such a league, Music Row wouldn't sign them to contracts, Country Radio wouldn't play their songs, and CMT wouldn't play their videos. It is sad to have witnessed the death of country music. But death came many years ago, and most didn't recognize the passing right away. But friends, the death of country music isn't nearly as sad, as watching the values that once guided America pass away. I will be happy to move on to the home I have been promised in the next life. But the reality of what my generation leaves behind for their children, and grandchildren, breaks my heart. Life in America today is not what the Creator intended it to be. If you have no idea what I'm talking about·you should check it out for yourself. Eternity is forever, and that's a long, long time.



    What's Happening?

    Thanks to Dick Shuey at TwangTownUSA for adding my Hall of Fame webpage to his Country Links page. The best country music news is reported daily at his website: www.TwangTownUSA.com/news.

    The new season of "Nashville Star" debuts with LeAnn Rimes as host, on March 1, 2005. One of the contestants is Jody Evans, 28, from Donaldson, Arkansas. Evans is a police officer by day, and sings rockabilly by night. Good luck Jody.

    The Country Music DJ and Radio Hall of Fame Dinner and Award Ceremony will take place Tuesday, Mar. 1, 2005. An Induction Ceremony begins at 7:15 p.m. CRB will induct Lonnie Bell, Coyote Calhoun, Dan Hollander, Johnny "K" Koval and Bob Mitchell into the DJ Hall of Fame. Mack Sanders and Bill Ward will be inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame and Larry Daniels will receive the CRB President's Award. CRB will present the CRB Career Achievement Award to legendary Country music pioneer Dolly Parton, featuring special performances by Martina McBride and Catherine Britt.

    NASHVILLE, TN. (MCA Nashville/ www.mercurynashville.com) - There's More Where That Came From, the seventh album to be released by MCA recording artist and two-time Grammy award winner Lee Ann Womack, hit stores nationwide February 8th. Available on CD and classic vinyl (where they are sold), the 12-track album includes Womack's new hit single "I May Hate Myself In The Morning."

    Someone whom I regard with great esteem, told me that this Womack CD is the best country album to come out of Nashville in years. (If it's truly country - it may be the only one to come out of Nashville in years).

    You can hear Al Krivoy and the Fabulous Rockabilly's, on Roy Costs daily Internet Radio Show. Check it out at: www.Roycost.com

    Billy Joe Shaver's biography "Honky Tonk Hero" will be available in March, 2005. This book is a must read.



    Q. & A.
    Laurent Petit, writes from Paris, France with the following:
    Q: My name is Laurent, I am 37 years old and live in Paris, France. I just bought a copy of one of your original TNT 45rpm records. "Baby Be Good" is such a great song!!! Friends of mine have a Rockabilly band here in Paris, and they do a cover version of Baby Be Good during their stage show. I am now looking for your second TNT release "Set Me Free." I would be very honored if you could send me a signed picture of you in the early days, when you were with the TNT label. I can send you a few bucks for postage if you want, it will be my "small contribution" to you for the money that TNT never paid you. I am going to try to record my friends on stage and will send you a copy. I hope you like their version of Baby Be Good.
    A: Thank you for the kind words Laurent. I hope you enjoy my old 45's as much as I enjoyed recording them. I'm having more 8 X 10's copied and will get one off in the mail to you when they are available. And the picture will definitely be one that was taken in the early days, (1950's) You certainly would not want a recent shot. By the way·tell your friends in the band, an old man in the USA said thanks for keeping his music alive. Do you have any idea how that makes me feel?



    Before They Were Stars

    Pete Anderson played in country bars around Los Angeles prior to teaming up with Dwight Yoakam.

    Suzy Bogguss majored in art at Illinois State University. She later headlined shows At Dollywood theme park in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.

    Henson Cargill attended Colorado State University, toured the West Coast with the Kimberleys, and worked the Las Vegas Nightclub circuit.

    Jerry Douglas played in his father's Bluegrass band.

    Connie Eaton was a student at David Lipscomb College.

    Teddy Gentry installed carpets.

    Doyle Holly worked the oilfields, and served four years in the U. S. Army.



    Stage Names
    (Hollywood)
    Edie Adams use to be Elizabeth Edith Enke.
    John Barrymore was once know as John Blythe.
    Lee J. Cobb was born Leo Jacoby.
    Angie Dickinson grew up as Angeline Brown.
    Barbara Eden also received mail addressed to Barbara Huffman.
    Sally Field sounded better to studio executives than Sally Mahoney.
    Greta Garbo made the long trip to stardom, Greta Gustafsson silently tagged along.



    Did You Know?

    WSM debuted the "Friday Night Frolics," later called the Friday Night Opry, in 1948. This decision was made after Eddy Arnold quit the Grand Ole Opry, and was about to start his own Friday night show on another Nashville radio station. Arnold quit the Opry after his manager, Col. Tom Parker, demanded a percentage of the Opry gate be paid to his client, and the Opry refused.

    During a sixteen-month period ranging from March 5th, 1963 to July 31st, 1964 the Grand Ole Opry Family lost the following:

    3-5-63 - Patsy Cline, Cowboy Copas, Hawkshaw Hankins and Randy Hughes, died near Camden, Tennessee In a plane crash.

    3-7-63 - Jack Anglin of "Johnny & Jack," was killed in a car wreck en route to Patsy Clines funeral.

    3-29-63 - Texas Ruby died in a trailer fire near Nashville.

    Chet Atkins came to Nashville in 1950, as a band member for The Carter Sisters. He left them after one year to pursue a career of his own.

    Rosanne Cash was married to Rodney Crowell from 1979 - 1992.

    Ralph Emery took a pay cut in 1957, to go to work for WSM radio.

    Dallas studio owner Jim Beck, discovered Lefty Frizzell at the Ace of Clubs in Big Springs, Texas in 1950. Beck cut a demo on Lefty, and as a result, Don Law signed Lefty to Columbia Records. Lefty's first two releases "If You've Got The Money," and "I Love You a Thousand Ways," both went to #1.

    Merle Haggard's father died when he was 9 years old. At age 11, Merle ran away from home because he thought he was a burden to his widowed mother.

    Tootsie's Orchid Lounge in Nashville, sponsor of this monthly column, also sponsors a portion of the Grand Ole Opry. When in Nashville, please stop by Tootsie's and say hello. Tell them Susie's dad sent you.



    RCNV "Lasts"

    John Anderson recorded the last session at Owen Bradley's legendary studio "The Hut" on June 24, 1982. The Music Row studio was once home to Patsy Cline, Brenda Lee, Lefty Frizzell, Marty Robbins, Loretta Lynn and may others.

    Lefty Frizzell recorded "Saginaw, Michigan," on October 21,1963. It was his last #1 record.

    The Louvin Brothers played their last show as a duo in Watseka, Illinois, on August, 18, 1963.

    Elvis Presley's last #1 hit "Suspicious Minds" was released by RCA on September 20, 1969.

    Roy Rogers was the last  person to have been elected twice to the Country Music Hall of Fame. He founded the "Sons of the Pioneers" and as a member of that group was elected to the CMHF in 1980. Roy was elected to the CMHF as an individual, in 1989.

    The WLS National Barn Dance aired their last broadcast from Chicago's Eighth Street Theater, on August 31, 1957.

    The Statler Brothers performed their last concert in Salem, Virginia, on October 26, 2002.



    From the Wisdom Desk:
    Obituary
    Today we mourn the passing of a beloved old friend by the name of Common Sense, who has been with us for many years. No one knows for sure how old he was, since his birth records were long ago lost in bureaucratic red tape. He will be remembered as having cultivated such value lessons as knowing when to come in out of the rain, why the early bird gets the worm and that life isn't always fair. Common Sense lived by simple, sound financial policies (don't spend more than you earn) and reliable parenting strategies (adults, not kids, are in charge) and the belief that God really meant what he said in the Bible. His health began to rapidly deteriorate when well intentioned but overbearing regulations were set in place. Reports of a six-year-old boy charged with sexual harassment for kissing a classmate; teens suspended from school for using mouthwash after lunch; and a teacher fired for reprimanding an unruly student only worsened his condition. It declined even further when schools were required to get parental consent to administer aspirin to a student; but, could not inform the parents when a student became pregnant and wanted to have an abortion. Finally, Common sense lost the will to live as the Ten Commandments became contraband; churches became businesses; and criminals received better treatment than their victims. All of this delighted the God hating ACLU. Common Sense finally gave up the ghost after a woman failed to realize that a steaming cup of coffee was hot, she spilled a bit in her lap, and was awarded a huge settlement by twelve other greedy dumbbells. Common Sense was preceded in death by his parents, Truth and Trust, his wife Discretion; his daughter, Responsibility; and his son, Reason. He is survived by two stepbrothers; My Rights and Ima Whiner. Not many attended his funeral because so few realized he was gone. America·what are you thinking?
    --Author known but to God


    Bill's Favorite Music Links:
    http://rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/index.htm
    http://www.etrecordshop.com
    http://www.dickshuey.com
    http://rockabillyhall.com/BillMorrison.html
    http://www.clabranson.com
    http://www.countrymusicclassics.com
    http://www.countryweekly.com
    http://www.google.com
    http://www.liveradio.netv
    http://www.roycost.com
    http://www.musicreview.com
    http://www.radiohof.org
    http://www.stararchive.com
    http://www.whodoesthatsong.com
    http://www.wsmonline.com
    www.ifco.org/links.html
    http://www.countryhall.com
    http://www.roysamazinglinks.com
    http://www.oldiesmusic.com/index.html
    http://www.talentondisplay.com/country calendar.html
    Visit Bill Morrison's Country Calendar







    "FEBRUARY '05"
    Volume 19
    January 26, 2005 - ©Bill Morrison

    Quote of the Month
    Quote: "It was really our first major appearance outside of Memphis, and it didn't go over so good. On a scale of one to ten I'd say it was something like a five, with an anchor."
           -Scotty Moore talking about Elvis' only Grand Ole Opry appearance.


    February Highlights

    Lisa Marie Presley, Elvis' only child, was born 2-1-1968.

    People Magazine reported on 2-2-2001, that Garth Brooks and ex-wife Sandy are sharing the same ranch in Oklahoma. Sandy and the three daughters occupy a house trailer, until their new home is completed. Garth lives in a house on the ranch.

    Buddy Holly, The Big Bopper, and Richie Valens, were killed in a plane crash in Clear Lake, Iowa on 2-3-1959. Waylon Jennings, bass player for Buddy Holly, gave his seat on the plane to The Big Bopper, due to the Bopper's illness. Waylon's kindness saved his own life.

    "W.W. and the Dixie Dance Kings," starring Burt Reynolds, Jerry Reed, Mel Tillis, and Don Williams, premiered at Nashville's Crescent Theater 2-4-1975.

    Roy Acuff made his second appearance on the Grand Ole Opry on 2-5-1938. The huge amount of fan mail generated by this guest appearance, was enough to convince George D. Hay, to make Roy a regular member of the Opry.

    George Jones, "The Possum," joined the Louisiana Hayride 2-6-1956.

    Dale Evans, age 88, widow of Roy Rogers, died in California 2-7-2001. Dale wrote "The Bible Tells Me So" and Roy's theme song "Happy Trails To You." Member National Cowgirl Hall Of Fame.

    The 46th Annual Grammy Awards were held on 2-8-2004. June Carter Cash won for best "Female Country Vocal Performance." Vince Gill won for best "Male Country Vocal Performance." Alison Krauss won four Grammys this year, making her the all time leading female Grammy winner in any genre. Aretha Franklin was the prior leading winner with sixteen total Grammys.

    Bill Haley, age 55, died of a heart attack, Harlingen, TX 2-9-1981. Inducted R&RHOF 1987 and the Rockabilly Hall of Fame.

    Ral Donner, born Ralph Donner, Chicago, IL 2-10-1943.

    Gene Vincent born Norfolk, VA 2-11-1935.

    Moe Bandy born "Marion Franklin Bandy Jr." Meridian, MS 2-12-1944.

    Waylon Jennings, age 64, died in his sleep in Chandler, AZ on 2-13-2002. Inducted Country Music Hall of Fame 2001, Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame 1995, and the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame 1999.

    Buddy Knox, age 65, died of cancer 2-14-1999.

    John Wallace "Wally" Fowler, founder of the group that became "The Oak Ridge Boys," born Adairsville, GA. 2-15-1917.

    Andy Griggs was arrested in Tallahassee, FL 2-16-2001, along with a member of his band. They reportedly stole an ambulance and took it for a joyride. The two men were charged with felony charges of Grand Theft Auto.

    Gus Hardin "Carolyn Ann Blankenship," age 50, died in a car crash 2-17-1996.

    Hattie Louise Bess, owner of Tootsie's Orchid Lounge, died at age 63, 2-18-1978.

    Carl Perkins released "Blue Suede Shoes" for SUN Records 2-19-1956. The single went to #1 on the country charts.

    Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton, performed together onstage for the first time since their 1974 breakup, on 2-20-1988.

    Malcolm Yelvington, age 82, SUN Records recording artist, died Memphis, TN on 2-21- 2001. One of Malcom's hits was "Drinkin' Wine Spo-Dee-O-Dee."

    Johnny Cash proposed to June Carter on stage in London, Ontario 2-22-1968.

    Capitol released Eddie Cochran's 2-album set "Singin' to My Baby/Never to be Forgotten" on 2-23-1993, thirty-three years after his death in a London car crash.

    Webb Pierce, age 69, died Nashville, TN 2-24-1991. Inducted Country Music Hall of Fame 2001. Reason for the delay·Music City politics.

    Thomas Green Ryman filed a Charter of Incorporation, forming the "Union Gospel Tabernacle," on 2-25-1889. After his death, the name of the church building would Be changed to The "Ryman Auditorium."

    Johnny Cash, "The Man In Black" born Kingsland, AR on 2-26-1932, the fourth of seven children to Roy and Carrie Cash.

    Marty Robbins began a ten-week run at #1 with "Don't Worry About Me" 2-27-1961.

    The all new Kentucky Music Hall of Fame and Museum, located in Renfro Valley, KY, inducted the following artists on 2-28-2002: Tom T. Hall, Loretta Lynn, the Osborne Brothers, Merle Travis, Bill Monroe, Jean Ritchie, the Everly Brothers, Red Foley, Grandpa Jones, John Lair, Bradley Kincaid and Rosemary Clooney.

    Henson Cargill's "Skip A Rope" was #1 on 2-29-1968.



    Good News From A Friend
                 Everett Corbin, former editor of the Nashville based "Music City News" wrote me with the following news about Vernon Oxford, one of the best country artists I've ever heard:
                 The GREAT traditionalist, Vernon Oxford, while getting decent airplay on traditional country music radio, is at the moment enjoying his best years on Christian Music Radio (especially in Europe). The new European Christian Country Chart shows Vernon Oxford in his 5th month on that chart with another song from THE OXFORD TOUCH, entitled:  "NO ONE IS LISTENING"
                 "LET YOUR LIGHT SHINE" just fell off that chart; but his best showing to date has been with  I LOVE TO SING, which remained there for some 7 months, all produced and written by Everett Corbin, a former editor of MUSIC CITY NEWS, now promoting the music of Vernon Oxford.
                 Vernon's website is: www.vernonoxfordcountry.com and DJs needing  THE OXFORD TOUCH  should contact Everett at: ejcorbin@juno.com.



    RCNV "Firsts"

    Roy Acuff was the first vocalist featured on the Grand Ole Opry.

    The Bellamy Brothers won their first CMA award in 2002, when they were presented with the International Artist Achievement Award.

    Clint Black was the first artist in any genre to have five #1 hits from his debut album.

    Johnny Cash released his first single "Hey Porter"  on Sun Records in 1955.

    The CMA Awards were broadcast from the Ryman Auditorium, on NBC-TV for the first time in 1968. Roy Rogers and Dale Evans were co-hosts.

    The First Annual Dale Earnhardt Tribute Concert was held at Daytona International Speedway on June 28, 2003.

    Red Foley was the first country artist to have his own radio show (1939.)



    News Note

    Last months issue or RCNV included a list of folks in the Music World that we lost in 2004. That list should have included the names of:
    Jan Berry, age 62, of Jan & Dean, who died on March 26, 2004.
    Jimmy Lee Fautheree, of Jimmy & Johnny, who died on June 29, 2004.
    Thanks to my friend, Dominique Anglares, from the Brest R'n'R Appreciation Society in Brest, France, for providing the above information on Jimmy Lee Fautheree.

    Sara Evans performed at the Black Tie & Boots Texas presidential inaugural event in Washington on January 19. 2005 The sold-out gala was sponsored by the Texas State Society of Washington. Also appearing at the Black Tie & Boots event were Lyle Lovett, Asleep at the Wheel, Robert Earl Keen, Gary P. Nunn, Clay Walker and gospel singer Yolanda Adams.

    Julie Roberts was among the stars performing January 8, 2005 in support of St. Louis Cardinals baseball manger Tony LaRussa's Animal Rescue Foundation's benefit concert in Walnut Creek, California. The annual event raises money to aid in the protection of animals.

    Trace Adkins was part of the musical entertainment in the FedEx Orange Bowl Halftime Show. Other artists appearing at halftime were pop star Ashlee Simpson and the first American Idol winner, Kelly Clarkson. Adkins performed his current single, "Songs About Me." Producers of the show evidently liked how Adkins band member John Hill (fiddle & back-up vocals) did his job. They seemed to focus any close-up shots of the performance on this very talented Nashville veteran. Fortunately·there were no wardrobe mal-functions at this half-time show.



    What's Happening?

    Lee Ann Womack's 7th album will be hitting the stores February 8th. The title is "There's More Where That Came From."

    George Strait will not appear at this years Houston Livestock & Rodeo. George will be entertaining folks in Argentina. The show runs from March 1st through the 20th, and will feature Clay Walker, Alan Jackson, Big & Rich, Gretchen Wilson, Montgomery Gentry, Neal McCoy, Martina McBride, Brad Paisley, Pat Green, and Lee Greenwood.

    Eddy Arnold, Jerry Lee Lewis, and the original members of the Carter Family will receive The Recording Academy's Lifetime Achievement Award. The honors will be presented February 12th, the night before the 47th Annual Grammy Awards.

    Kenny Chesney released a new CD  entitled "Be As You Are: Songs From An Old Blue Chair" on January 25, 205.

    Lynn Anderson was inducted into the German Country Music Hall of Fame on January 29, 2005. The Bellamy Brothers, Johnny Cash, Billie Jo Spears, Dave Dudley, and Charlie McCoy were previously inducted into the GCMHF.

    "Banjo Man: The Musical Journey of Earl Scruggs"
    will go on exhibit at the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville on March 4, 2005.



    Q, & A.

    Donna E. writes from Joplin, Missouri, with the following question:
                 Q: My brother died Christmas Day 2003. He was 55 years old. He died alone in a furnished apartment, with no one in his life to spend the holiday with. After a lifetime of playing music, his only possessions were an electric guitar with cigarette burns on it, a dirty amp, and a drawer full of unpaid bills. Can you tell me why any man would waste his whole life playing music, when he didn't make enough money to support himself? I just don't get it.
                 A: I didn't know your brother, and I'm certainly not qualified to speak for him. I would suggest however, that he left a lot more than you are aware of. If he was able to sustain himself for all those years by playing music, he must have been pretty good with that old guitar. And he must have brought a lot of joy, to a lot of people. Speaking for myself, I can tell you that music has been my mistress, my passion, my only hope apart from God, and my constant companion all the days of my life. I can't explain that. I doubt if your brother could have explained it. But it's who he was. And Donna, wherever he is, I hope he's playing a brand new guitar and making people's hearts happy. Don't you?
                 If you have a music related question, or comment, send it to: BillMorrison2002@hotmail.com. Please include your name, hometown and state.



    Before They Were Stars

    Lynn Anderson = sang back-up on her mother (Liz Anderson's) RCA recordings.

    Mandy Barnett = at age ten, Mandy won the "Best Country Act" contest at Dollywood.

    Billy Byrd = "William Lewis Byrd" began his career playing guitar with Pop bands in the Nashville area. He became famous as lead guitar player for Ernest Tubb.

    Deana Carter = graduated from Goodlettsville High School in Tennessee, where she was a cheerleader. She studied rehabilitation therapy at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. She worked as a physical therapist, and waitress, prior to finding success in Music City. Deana is the daughter of legendary Nashville session guitarist Fred Carter Jr.

    Kenny Chesney = born in Knoxville, Tennessee and grew up in Luttrell. Kenny graduated from Gibbs High School in Corrington, and earned a degree in marketing from East Tennessee State University in 1990.

    Ronnie Dunn = studied theology at Abilene Christian College in Texas.

    Mel McDaniel = sang in bars and honky tonks in Alaska.



    Stage Names (Hollywood)

    Woody Allen = Allen Konigsberg
    Orson Bean = Dallas Burrows
    Diahann Carroll = Carol Diahann Johnson
    Rodney Dangerfield = Jacob Cohen  
    Chad Everett = Raymond Cramton
    Glenn Ford = Gwyllyn Samuel Newton Ford
    John Garfield = Julius Garfinkle
    Buddy Hackett = Leonard Hacker
    Burl Ives = Burle Icle Ivanhoe
    Michael Landen = Eugene Orowitz



    RCNV News Flash

    Don Helms former steel guitarist for Hank Williams Sr., was hospitalized on January 14, 2005, suffering from a stroke. At last report this Hall of Fame guitarist was out of the hospital and recovering nicely.

    On January 19, 2005, Stefan Wohl, age 42, driver of a Dave Matthews Band tour bus was charged with dumping 800 pounds of human waste into the Chicago River. The incident occurred on August 8, 2004, as Wohl drove across a bridge near the Chicago Loop, and emptied the bus's septic tank on the metal grates of the bridge. The waste landed on the deck of "Chicago's Little Lady" tour boat, while it was passing below with over 100 passengers on board. Many of the passengers have complained that their clothes were ruined by the human waste that fell on them. In addition to the criminal charges, the Illinois Attorney General filed a lawsuit seeking $70,000 in damages against the band and the driver for violating state environmental laws.

    For the first time in her career, Dolly Parton will host a segment of the Grand Ole Opry on February 5th, 2005. It will mark the country legends first visit to Opry at the Ryman in over thirty years. While she has made several appearances on the Opry over the years, this will be her first appearance on the Opry while it is being performed on the Ryman stage, since it moved to the new Grand Ole Opry house at Opryland in 1974.



    Did You Know?

    On Saturday, March 1, 1952, Uncle Dave Maconmade his final appearance on the Grand Ole Opry. Dave came down with a throat ailment shortly after that Opry appearance, entered a hospital in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and died a short time later.

    Faron Young appeared in his first movie" Hidden Guns," in 1956. This movie was responsible for Faron's nick-name "The Young Sheriff."

    On February 11, 2004, Vestal Goodman, Al Green, Sandi Patty, and BMI president Frances Preston were inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame in Nashville.

    Rex Allen made his last singing cowboy movie, "Phantom Stallion," in 1954.

    Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan were inducted into the New York State Country Music Hall of Fame on September 25, 2004.

    Harold Jenkins became Conway Twitty, and recorded for Sun Records in 1957.

    On September 23, 1952, Hank Williams recorded "Your Cheatin' Heart," "Kaw-Liga," and "Take These Chains from My heart" at his very last recording session. All three songs became #1 records after his death the following year.

    Webb Pierce, Hawkshaw Hawkins, Jean Shepard, Jim Reeves and Flatt and Scruggs joined the Grand Ole Opry in 1955.

    In 1948, Eddy Arnold's manager, Colonel Tom Parker, demanded that the Grand Ole Opry pay Eddy a cut of the Grand Ole Opry ticket sales. The Grand Ole Opry refused, and Parker instructed his client to quit the Opry. A few weeks later Eddy Arnold announced to the Opry audience, that he was leaving the Grand Ole Opry, and went backstage at the Ryman Auditorium and cried.

    A private plane carrying the Dixie Chicks, hit a building at a Scotland airport on September 19, 2003. No injuries were reported. The Dixie Chicks, an all girl band from Texas, use to play country music and record in Nashville, prior to getting into politics in 2004.

    Kix Brooks grew up in Shreveport, Louisiana, on the same street with Billie Jean Williams Horton, the widow of both Hank Williams, and Johnny Horton. At age twelve, Kix played his first performance with Horton's daughter. Kix Brooks moved to Nashville in 1979.

    On September 17, 1998, the Country Music Hall of Fame displayed a new bronze statue of Hank Williams Sr., in honor of the legend's 75th birthday. Hank Williams III, son of Hank Jr., was the model used by the statue's artist.



    RCNV "Lasts"

    The Gene Autry Show aired for the last time on CBS-TV on August 7, 1956.

    Patsy Cline recorded "She's Got You" for Decca, on December 17, 1961. This was her second #1 single, and her last.

    Red Foley hosted his last Prince Albert Grand Ole Opry show, on April 18, 1953.

    Buddy Holly's last recording session was held on October 21, 1958.

    Jeanne Pruett joined the Grand Ole Opry on July 21, 1973. Pruett was the last person to become a member of the Opry on the stage of the Ryman Auditorium, prior to the move to the new Opry House.

    Bob Wills and The Texas Playboys, played their last show together in the Will Rogers Auditorium in Ft. Worth, Texas, on November 16, 1986.

    Hank Williams played the last show of his career at Austin's "Skyline Club" on December 19, 1952. Hank worked the show as a single (without his band.) Justin Tubb, a student at the University of Texas, was in the audience and met Hank backstage after the show. Hank died less than two weeks later.


    Beautiful Music But No Harmony
    The names of Gilbert and Sullivan are well known by all lovers of music. They produced 14 operas together in the period from 1871 to 1896. Gilbert's words allied to Sullivan's music produced magic.
                 The tragedy, however, is that the two men detested each other. The problem arose because Sullivan ordered some carpet for the theater they had bought, and when Gilbert saw the bill he hit the roof. Neither could control his temper, and the two battled it out in court. They never spoke to one another again as long as they lived.
                 When Sullivan wrote the music for a new production, he mailed it to Gilbert. When Gilbert wrote the words, he mailed it back to Sullivan. Once they were forced to be together during a curtain call, but they stood on opposite sides of the stage and bowed in different directions so they wouldn't see each other.
                 They knew how to make beautiful music, but they knew nothing about harmony.


    I Need Your Help!
                 I have been writing this column for nineteen months now. According to Google, there are lots of people visiting this site every month. The numbers of readers reflect that, the number of advertisers do not. Tootsie's Orchid Lounge in Nashville, has been a sponsor of this page from the beginning. The Ernest Tubb Record Shop has promoted the Rockabilly Hall of Fame, and my personal RHOF pages for over a year. I would like to have your help to defray the cost of displaying, and storing, these articles for your reading enjoyment. As an individual, a family, a business, or organization, your name and information can be placed on this page in the form of an ad, for a very reasonable price. You can advertise for a month, or a full year. All advertising money goes to the Hall of Fame - I don't need it. After recording for TNT Records, and writing songs for TNT Publishing, I have learned to live without money. The Hall of Fame has more expenses than I do, so this space must generate some income.
                 Contact the Director of the Rockabilly Hall of Fame at: Bob@RockabillyHall.com. He'll tell you how much, and where to send the check.

    See ya next month.
      Bill Morrison



    Bill's Favorite Music Links:
    http://rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/index.htm
    http://www.etrecordshop.com
    http://rockabillyhall.com/BillMorrison.html
    http://www.clabranson.com
    http://www.countrymusicclassics.com
    http://www.countryweekly.com
    http://www.google.com
    http://www.liveradio.netv
    http://www.roycost.com
    http://www.musicreview.com
    http://www.radiohof.org
    http://www.stararchive.com
    http://www.whodoesthatsong.com
    http://www.wsmonline.com
    www.ifco.org/links.html
    http://www.countryhall.com
    http://www.roysamazinglinks.com
    http://www.oldiesmusic.com/index.html
    http://www.twangtownusa.com/news
    http://www.dickshuey.com
    Visit Bill Morrison's Country Calendar








    "JANUARY '05"
    Volume 18
    December 23, 2004 - ©Bill Morrison

    Happy New Year
    from your friends at the Rockabilly Hall of Fame



    Quote of the Month
    Quote: "On the morning of December 31, 1952, I drove out of Nashville in a spitting snow with the band. We got as far as Louisville, Kentucky, where we encountered a blinding blizzard and the highway patrol informed us that the roads north were closed. We turned the car around, arrived back in Nashville in the early morning and got into our warm beds. When I got up late in the morning on January 1, 1953, I saw Hank's picture on the front page of the Nashville Tennessean and the headline which read, Country Singer Dies in Auto." --Jerry Rivers of Hank Williams' Drifting Cowboys band


    RCNV Spotlight
    "Friends we lost in 2004"
    January 4th: Jake Hess - 76
    January 9th: Lorene Allen - 78
    January 10th: Max D. Barnes - 67
    March 22nd: Danny Bailey - 84, of the Bailey Brothers
    March 23rd: Roy "Pop" Lewis - 98, of the Lewis Family
    April 17th: Dave Kirby - 65
    May 2nd: Edward Curtis Gordon - 73
    June 8th: Bill Lowery - past president of the Country Music Foundation
    June 10th: Ray Charles - 73
    July 9th: Ersel Hickey - 70
    September 7th: L. E. White - 74
    September 9th: Ernie Ball - 74
    September 20th: Skeeter Davis -72 September 23: Roy Drusky - 74
    October 13: Tommy Vaden - 79
    October 19th: Johnny Faulk - 79, of the Hackberry Ramblers
    November 4th: Dale Noe - 76
    November 20th: Charlie Cline - 73, of the Lonesome Pine Fiddlers
    November 25th: Bobby Lee House - 55
    December 7th: Jerry Scoggins - 93, leader of the Cass County Boys
    December 21: Mack Vickery - 66

    If you have a favorite artist, or songwriter, why not find a way to tell them in 2005, how their music has made a difference if your life. It would mean so very much to them and this may be your last opportunity to let them know. We don't know who will make this list next year.



    January Highlights

    Hank Williams Sr., age 29, died on 1/1/1953, in the back seat of his baby blue 1952 Cadillac convertible. Hank was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame 1961, and the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1970.

    Tex Ritter "Woodward Maurice Ritter," age 68, died in Nashville, on 1/2/1974. Member of the Grand Ole Opry, Tex was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1964, the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1971, and the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame in 1998. Tex is also a member of the Cowboy Hall of Fame. His dream of "Hillbilly Heaven," is now reality.

    Grandpa Jones suffered a severe stroke after completing his portion of a Grand Ole Opry Show on 1/3/1998.

    Jake Hess, age 76, died in a hospital in Opelika, Alabama, on 1/4/2004. Jake has been inducted into the Southern Gospel Music Hall of Fame, and the Alabama Music Hall of Fame.

    Big Bill Lister, 6' 7" tall, singer/songwriter, born Karnes County, Texas, on 1/5/1923. Hank Williams Sr. wrote a song, and put it on a demo for Bill, called "There's A Tear In My Beer." Bill gave that demo record to Hank Williams Jr. in 1988. With the assistance of modern technology, Junior turned it into a duet with his father, and a video, of Sr. and Jr. singing the song together.

    Dottie West lost her home to fire on 1/6/1969.

    Randy Kohrs signed with Junction Records on 1/7/2001.

    Elvis Presley, born Tupelo, Mississippi, on 1/8/1935. His twin brother, Jesse was stillborn, and buried in a shoebox in an unmarked grave.

    Johnny Cash. A portion of Gallatin Road in Hendersonville, Tennessee, was renamed Johnny Cash Parkway on 1/9/1982.

    Ronnie Hawkins, Rockabilly singer/guitarist born Huntsville, Arkansas, on 1/10/1935.

    The Glen Campbell "Goodtime Hour" featured guests, Merle Haggard, Buck Owens, and Johnny Cash on 1/11/1972.

    Gene Vincent inducted R&RHF on 1/12/1998.

    Buck Owens married fifteen-year-old Bonnie Campbell on 1/13/1948.

    Naomi Judd born "Diana Ellen Judd," in Ashland, Kentucky, on 1/14/1946.

    Robert Lee Castleman, writer of Allison Krauss' "The Lucky One," learned of the songs Grammy nomination, while at work on his full time job as a truck driver on 1/15/2002.

    John and Doug Brown, were arrested for the murder of Stringbean, and wife Estelle on 1/16/1974.

    Reba McEntire joined the Grand Ole Opry on 1/17/1986.

    Lisa Marie Presley filed for divorce from Michael Jackson on 1/18/1996.

    Carl Perkins, age 65, died on 1/19/1998. Inducted Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame 1985, R&RHF 1987, and more recently inducted into the Rockabilly Hall of Fame.

    Jerry Lee Lewis debuted on the Grand Ole Opry on 1/20/1973.

    Colonel Tom Parker, age 87, Elvis Presley's 50% manager, died on 1/21/1997.

    Porter Wagoner debuted on the Grand Ole Opry on 1/22/1955.

    Gerald Cline, Patsy Cline's first husband, filed for divorce on 1/23/1957.

    Justin Tubb, age 62, died from an aneurysm on 1/24/1998.

    Disc jockey "Cactus Jack Call," was killed in a car wreck on 1/25/1963. On March 3rd, a fund raising show for his family was held in Kansas City. It was on the trip back to Nashville on March 5th, that Patsy Cline, Hawkshaw Hawkins, Cowboy Copas and Randy Hughes, were killed in a plane crash, near Camden, TN.

    On January 26th, 1992, Hillary Clinton, appearing on CBS-TV during the 1992 presidential campaign, made a comment about Tammy Wynette, that caused the country music super-star to fight back. Hillary later apologized to Tammy, for the comment.

    Marty Robbins underwent heart by pass surgery on 1/27/1970.

    Stonewall Jackson recorded "Don't Be Angry," at his debut Columbia session on 1/28/1957.

    Little Jimmy Sizemore born Paintsville, Kentucky, on 1/29/1928. Little Jimmy became a cast member of the Grand Ole Opry at age five, working with his father Asher Sizemore.

    Jeanne Pruett born "Norma Jean Bowman," Pell City, Alabama, on 1/30/ 1937.

    Scotty Wiseman, age 67, a.k.a "Skyland Scotty," husband of Lulu Belle, died 1/31/1981. Inducted Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame 1971.


    What Ever Happened To:
    TOMMY CASH
                 Tommy Cash's hits include "Six White Horses," One Song Away," "Rise and Shine," "So This Is Love," and "I Recall a Gypsy Woman." The younger brother of Johnny Cash retired from the Music Business in the 70's, but he is once again available for bookings. Recent tours in Europe, and engagements in Branson have reminded fans just how talented this artist is. Tommy's songwriting credits include cuts by Kitty Wells, Conway Twitty, Jean Shepard, Loretta Lynn and Johnny Cash.
                 When not on the road, Tommy Cash can be found selling real estate, for Crye-Leike Realtors at 383 Johnny Cash Pkwy, Hendersonville, Tennessee 37075. If you're looking for Real Estate in Middle Tennessee, or you'd like to say hello, you can reach Tommy at: info@TommyCash.com.
                 I opened shows for Tommy Cash in the 60's and 70's this man is a wonderful entertainer, and a gentleman.


    Q. & A.
    Bridget Dunn, writes from Cincinnati, Ohio with the following question:
    Q: Is it true that the CMA Awards Show is moving to New York City in 2005? I can't believe they would do that.
    A: Bridget, if you watched the latest version of the CMA Awards you should realize as I do, that New York City is exactly where the Country Music Association belongs. Or better yet, lets send them to France. I hope they stay there forever in the land of Pop, Rap and Voodoo. Wouldn't it be wonderful if they took all of the (so called) country music radio stations with them? Our beloved country music has survived a great deal of adversity in the past. This time I believe it's been without oxygen for much too long. When George Jones and Merle Haggard's records can't get air time on the radio, then there is something wrong with the radio. And radio controls the entire process. Everything except the small Independent record labels. Texas, is the last hope for the survival of Traditional country music. Music Row, what's left of it, is on the way to the Intensive Care Unit·even as we speak. Anyone who loves real country music should visit, and support: http://www.clalonestar.com. They are the future of country music.
                 If you have a music related question, send it to: BillMorrison2002@hotmail.com. Please include your name and hometown or state.



    Before They Were Stars
    David Ball: Played bass in "Uncle Walt's Band" in the Austin, Texas area.

    Smiley Burnette: "Lester Alvin Burnette" began his career at WDZ radio in Tuscola, Illinois.

    June Carter Cash: Studied at the Actors' Studio in New York City, and began her career in 1939 as a member of the Carter Sisters.

    Deborah Allen: Former Memphis beauty queen, and back-up singer for Roy Orbison.

    Hawkshaw Hawkins: Served in the Pacific during World War II.

    Patty Loveless: Replaced Loretta Lynn as featured singer on the Wilburn Brother's Show when she was still in high school. She remained a part of the show for three years.

    Jerry Naylor: Formed his band at age 14 and worked the Louisiana Hayride. Toured with Cash, Horton, and Presley.

    Marty Robbins: Piloted a troop landing craft in the Pacific during World War II.

    Charlie Walker: One of America's top ten Country disc jockeys in San Antonio, Texas. He was later inducted into the FICAP Disc Jockey Hall of Fame.

    Dwight Yoakam: Drove a truck and moved furniture in Los Angeles. (and later embarrassed an old retired singer in Tootsie's Orchid Lounge in Nashville.)


    Stage Names (all genres)
    Moe Bandy is Marion Franklin Bandy Jr.
    Tony Bennett is Anthony Dominick Benedetto.
    Boxcar Willie is Lecil Travis Martin.
    Buddy Cagle is Walter L. Cagle Jr., from Concord, North Carolina.
    Bobby Darrin is Waldon Robert Cassetto.
    Gloria Estfan is Gloria Maria Fajardo.
    Tompall Glaser is Thomas Paul Glaser.
    Sonny James is James Hugh Loden.
    Al Jolson is Asa Yoelson.
    Madonna is Madonna Louise Veronica Ciccone.


    RCNV News Flash
    At last report Little Jimmy Dickens is recovering nicely at home, after receiving treatment for pneumonia at an undisclosed hospital in the Nashville area. If you would like to send a card or letter to Jim, here's how:
    Little Jimmy Dickens
    Grand Ole Opry
    2802 Opryland Dr.
    Nashville, TN 37214



    Did You Know?

    The Grand Ole Opry has an area backstage, with a post office box for each cast member. You can communicate with all of them at the above address. You would not believe how much the Traditional Country artists, enjoy receiving mail from their fans. Its about the only respect they receive in that building these days. They also have a telephone number. 615-889-3060. People have been known to call that number and tell the manager of the Grand Ole Opry (Pete Fisher) how they feel about today's version of Grand Ole Opry Pop.

    Roy Acuff was the first artist to record "Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain."

    Chet Atkins played on the Grand Ole Opry for years. At one point Chet had his own 15 minute portion of the Opry. He was however, never asked to become a member of the Opry.

    According to Margaret Jones, author of a Patsy Cline biography, there are a dozen places in Virginia that could claim to be the hometown of the nomadic Cline. Her family moved 19 times before she was 15.

    Red Foley had an affair with Sally Sweet in 1951. When his wife Eva, found out about the affair, she killed herself. Foley later married Sally.

    Merle Haggard was paroled from San Quentin Prison, after serving two years and nine months, of a five year sentence on November 3, 1960. The remaining two years and three months was served on parole.

    After Faron Young left the Louisiana Hayride in late 1952, Billy Walker, Jim Reeves, and Johnny Horton joined the show. It was during this period of time that the Hayride became affiliated with the CBS radio network.

    Waylon and Willie's album "The Outlaws," became Country Music's first million selling album in 1976.

    Movies filmed at Tootsie's include "W.W. & the Dixie Dance Kings" starring Bert Reynolds, "Coal Miner's Daughter" about Loretta Lynn and starring Sissy Spacek, and "The Nashville Rebel" starring Tex Ritter, Porter Wagoner, Faron Young, Loretta Lynn, The Wilburn Brothers, and Waylon Jennings.

    Bonnie Owens, born Bonnie Campbell, began her career as a singer with a group called "Mac's Skillet Lickers." Her first husband, Buck Owens, was also a member of the group. Bonnie later married Merle Haggard.

    Tootsie was a singer/comedienne with "Big Jeff & The Radio Playboys". Jeff Bess was the bandleader, and Tootsie's husband. Tootsie was also my friend·on good days and bad. The lady didn't always have a solution·but she always had time to listen.



    From The Wisdom Desk:
    Stated Goals Of The American Civil Liberties Union "ACLU"
                 The ACLU's founder, Roger Baldwin, stated: "We are for SOCIALISM, disarmament, and ultimately for abolishing the state itself... We seek the social ownership of property, the abolition of the propertied class, and the SOLE CONTROL of those who produce wealth. COMMUNISM is the goal." (Source: Trial and Error, by Geo. Grant)
                 The ACLU is destructive to the fabric of our society. Christians must recognize Satan as the source - the instigator - when the end results of an organization's efforts are only "to kill, to steal, and to destroy." All we need do is examine the (rotten) fruit.
                 Following are some of the stated goals of the ACLU, from its own published Policy Issues:
    **the legalization of prostitution (Policy 211);
    **the defense of all pornography, including CHILD PORN, as "free speech" (Policy 4);
    **the decriminalization and legalization of all drugs (Policy 210);
    **the promotion of homosexuality (Policy 264);
    **the opposition of rating of music and movies (Policy 18);
    **opposition against parental consent of minors seeking abortion (Policy 262);
    **opposition of informed consent preceding abortion procedures (Policy 263);
    **opposition of spousal consent preceding abortion (Policy 262);
    **opposition of parental choice in children's education (Policy 80)
    ... not to mention the defense and promotion of euthanasia, polygamy, government control of church institutions, gun control, tax-funded abortion, birth limitation, etc. (Policies 263, 133, 402, 47, 261, 323, 271, 91, 85).
    I just thought you should know.


    Bill's Favorite Music Links:
    http://rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/index.htm
    http://www.etrecordshop.com
    http://rockabillyhall.com/BillMorrison.html     http://www.blueridgeopry.com/artists.html
    http://www.clabranson.com
    http://www.countrymusicclassics.com
    http://www.countryweekly.com
    http://www.google.com
    http://www.liveradio.netv
    http://www.musicreview.com
    http://www.radiohof.org
    http://www.stararchive.com
    http://www.whodoesthatsong.com
    http://www.wsmonline.com
    www.ifco.org/links.html http://www.countryhall.com
    http://www.roysamazinglinks.com
                                   http://www.oldiesmusic.com/index.html
                    http://www.talentondisplay.com/country calendar.html







    "DECEMBER"
    Volume 17
    November 26, 2004 ©Bill Morrison

    Merry Christmas from the Rockabilly Hall of Fame.

    This month's issue of "Rockabilly Country News & Views" is dedicated to the men and women of our armed forces and their loved ones. We salute you for your dedication to service, and for the sacrifices you make every day. We owe you a debt that we can never repay - may God Bless you, one and all.


    Quote of the Month
    Quote: "Hank told me he wanted to make a profession of singing and playing. He wanted to play the nightclubs and honky-tonks. He was only twelve but I let him do it. It was rough going." --Lilly Williams (mother of Hank Williams)


    News Note
    The Hall of Fame has updated, my Bio page, which can be found at: www.rockabillyhall.com/billmorrison.html. I am very proud of that page, and grateful for the time, and work that was invested in the project. The Rockabilly Hall of Fame has more information, photos, and stories about our music, than all other music Hall of Fames put together. I invite you to explore the website, and our sister sites. You won't be disappointed. And if you have a few extra dollars in your account - a small donation, or even better, a large donation, would be greatly appreciated, and it's tax deductible. The Hall of Fame lives at: www.rockabillyhall.com


    December Highlights

  • Joe Heathcock, age 66, singer, fiddler, movie, and TV actor, died in Nashville on 12/1/1980.

  • The National Academy of Songwriters, presented Johnny Cash with their "Lifetime Achievement Award" on 12/2/1998. The ceremony was conducted in Los Angeles.

  • NBC aired Elvis' TV Special on 12/3/1968.

  • The Million Dollar Quartet, Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins, Elvis Presley, and Jerry Lee Lewis, recorded a session together at SUN Studio in Memphis, on 12/4/1956.

  • George Morgan, Don Gibson, Billy Grammer, Johnnie Wright, Kitty Wells, The Jordanaires, Faron Young, Ferlin Husky, Justin Tubb, Stonewall Jackson, and Ray Price, were dismissed from the Grand Ole Opry on 12/5/1956, after refusing to sign a new contract, which required them to appear on the Opry, a minimum of 26 weekends per year, at union scale.

  • Roy Orbison, age 52, died in Hendersonville, Tennessee on 12/6/1988.

  • June Carter performed for the first time on the Johnny Cash Show in Dallas, Texas on 12/7/1961.

  • Marty Robbins died in Nashville, on 12/8/1982, after suffering a heart attack. Marty was a member of The Grand Ole Opry/Movie and TV actor/NASCAR Driver/Inducted Country Music Hall of Fame 1982. Inducted Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame 1975.

  • Faron Young, age 64, shot himself in the head, at his home in Nashville, on 12/9/1996. He died in the hospital, the following day.

  • The WSM Barn Dance was renamed The Grand Ole Opry on 12/10/1927.

  • Tex Ritter, and the plane that he was a passenger on, were hijacked to Cuba on 12/11/1968.

  • George and Norma Strait were married twice in December 1971. Once in Mexico, and once in Pearsall, Texas in front of their parents. Can you guess which ceremony was first?

  • Hank Williams had surgery on his spine on 12/13/1951. The surgery was the result of an injury he received while hunting in September, with Jerry Rivers. The surgery was not successful, and Hank suffered a great deal of pain until his death.

  • Lorrie Morgan, age 14, debuted on the Grand Ole Opry on 12/14/1973.

  • Hank Williams, age 19, and Audrey Sheppard Guy, were married in a gas station in Andalusia, Alabama on 12/15/1944.

  • Wynonna Judd pled guilty to Drunk Driving in a Nashville Court on 12/16/ 2003. She lost her driving privileges for one year, and was sentenced to perform 200 hours of community service. In addition, she was sentenced to serve eleven months and twenty-nine days in jail. The jail time was suspended, and she will serve that time on probation. After paying $350.00 in fines and court costs, Wynonna was released.

  • Rex Allen Sr., age 77, the Arizona Cowboy, died on 12/17/1999. The singer, actor was accidentally killed in Tucson, Arizona, when his caregiver ran over him with a car.

  • Pee Wee King debuted his weekly TV show on WBBM in Chicago, Illinois on 12/18/1954.

  • Waylon Jennings' left foot was amputated in Phoenix, on 12/19/2001.

  • Hank Snow, age 85, died 12/20/1999. Member Grand Ole Opry. Inducted Country Music Hall of Fame 1979. Member Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame.

  • Freddie Hart, was born "Frederick Segrest," in Lockapoke, AL 12/21/1926.

  • Hawkshaw Hawkins born Harold Franklin Hawkins, Huntington, West Virginia, 12/22/1921.

  • Funeral services were open to the public as the Grand Ole Opry house hosted Hank Snow's final public appearance. Hank, age 85, was buried on 12/23/1999. The service was televised.

  • Little Jimmy Dickens married Mona Evans 12/24/1971.

  • Sixteen-year-old Priscilla Beaulieu spent Christmas at Graceland 12/25/1960.

  • "Bashful Brother Oswald," Beecher Ray "Pete" Kirby, born Sevier County, TN 12/26/1911.

  • Bob Luman, age 41, died in Nashville, TN 12/27/1978.

  • Tex Ritter made his final appearance on the Grand Ole Opry 12/28/1973.

  • Buddy Knox released "Party Doll," 12/29/1956.

  • Skeeter Davis, born "Mary Frances Penick," Dry Ridge, Ky. 12/30/1931.

  • Rick Nelson, age 45, his fiance Helen Blair, and all of the members of Rick's "Stone Canyon Band," were killed in a plane crash near DeKalb, Texas, on 12/31/1985.



    What's Happening?
    Billy London, of The Billy London Trio in Nashville, had surgery on Friday November 19th. I heard from Billy on the 20th, and he was reporting that his pain medication wasn't working as well as he would like· - but the surgery was a success. I was convinced that the outcome would be positive. That's because I knew how many people were praying for Billy around the globe. Billy London is scheduled to debut his new Rockabilly Radio Show next month (January) from Music City. RCNV will keep you updated on this exciting new show.



    RCNV Spotlight

    One of my favorite things to hear in these troubled times is, "there's a new Rockabilly Band entertaining fans in America." I heard that again last week, and this band has just released their first CD, titled "The Fabulous Rockabillys." Now that is music to my tired old ears. Bob Timmers, Director of the Rockabilly Hall of Fame has been promoting, and prolonging the life of Rockabilly music for years. However, I believe Bob would be the first to tell you, we must have some new, fresh (young) artists and groups, if Rockabilly is to survive. Well the state of Michigan has just that.

    I recently heard from Al Krivoy, leader of "The Fabulous Rockabillys" in Grand Rapids, Michigan. This very humble, pleasant young man, tells me their CD is getting air play on county, and rock, radio stations. Air play is the secret to success in this business, and I wish The Fabulous Rockabillys nothing but success. Meet "The Fabulous Rockabillys."
    Al Krivoy: Band leader, vocalist, and bassist
    Ashley Asphalt: Female vocalist
    Kirk Zillmer: Lead guitarist, vocalist
    Kent Lavengood: Guitarist
    Calvin Weeks: Drummer

    The Fabulous Rockabillys tell me that two of their favorite places to play in Michigan are; Riggy's Bar in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and The Rogue River Lounge in Rockford. If you live in the area, call the owners at these two venues and ask for the dates when the Fabulous Rockabillys will be playing.



    Q. & A.
    Les Douglas writes from Canada with the following question:
    Q: I know who the Carter Family is, but who are the Carter Sisters? Are they related to the Carter Family?
    A: The Carter Sisters, consisted of Maybelle Carter and her daughters, Helen, June, and Anita. After the Carter Family broke up in 1943 The Carter Sisters went to work at a radio station in Richmond, Virginia. Maybelle played guitar, Anita played bass, June was the comedienne of the group and played autoharp, and Helen played accordion. Within four years the Carter Sisters were headlining the Old Dominion Barn Dance in Richmond. In 1949 while playing on the Tennessee Barn Dance in Knoxville, Chet Atkins was hired to play for the group. They moved to the Ozark Jubilee, and then in 1950 the group joined the Grand Ole Opry and moved to Nashville. The Carter Sisters were a part of the Johnny Cash Show in 1969, and were cast members of John's Network television show, which was aired from the Ryman Auditorium. I don't know about you Les, but I miss every one of them.
    If you have a music related question, send it to: BillMorrison2002@hotmail.com. Please include your name, hometown and state.



    Before They Were Stars

  • Bill Anderson earned a degree in journalism at the University of Georgia.

  • John Berry decided to make music a career, after both of his legs were crushed in a motorcycle accident.

  • Ed Bruce was raised in Memphis, and recorded for SUN Records. He worked as a car salesman, prior to moving to Nashville.

  • A. P. Carter a.k.a. Alvin Pleasant Delaney Carter, sold fruit trees prior to stardom. He married Sara Dougherty on June 18, 1915. The Carter Family came in to being in 1927, when Maybelle Addington, Sara's cousin joined the group.

  • Eddy Cochran was born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma on October 3, 1938. He grew up in Albert Lea, Minnesota, and was living in Los Angeles as a teenager. Eddie found fame in 1958 with "Summertime Blues."

  • Roy Drusky student at University of Georgia/two years U. S. Navy.

  • Bobbie Gentry a.k.a. "Roberta Streeter" was a secretary and Las Vegas dancer.

  • Hank Locklin worked as a laborer.

  • Marie Osmond signed with MGM Records when she was 13 years old.

  • Terri Clark a.k.a. Terry Sauson, was raised in Calgary, Alberta, and moved to Nashville after finishing High School. The money she needed to make the move to Music City, was earned working in a Chinese Restaurant. Terri was hired to sing with the band, at the world famous Tootsie's Orchid Lounge in Nashville. This rest as they say - is history.



    Stage Names (all genres)
  • Gary Allan is Gary Allan Herzberg.
  • Brook Benton is Benjamin Franklin Peay.
  • Sonny Bono is Salvatore Bono.
  • Cher is Cherilyn Sarkisian La Piere.
  • Alice Cooper is Vincent Damon Furnier.
  • Doris Day is Doris von Kappelhoff.
  • Bob Dylan is Robert Allen Zimmerman.
  • Lefty Frizzell is William Orville Frizzell.
  • Judy Garland is Frances Ethyl Bumgarner.
  • Eydie Gorme is Edith Gormezano.



    RCNV News Flash
    If you would like to become one of the sponsor's of this monthly column, please contact Bob Timmers, the Director of the Rockabilly Hall of Fame. The cost is very reasonable, and you'll be glad you did. You can contact Bob at: Bob@rockabillyhall.com, or call the Hall of Fame at: 615-740-7625. Your name, or your company's name, would look great at the top of this page. It would also help keep this column alive and well for another year.



    Did You Know?

  • Colonel Tom Parker became Eddy Arnold's manager in 1945.

  • After divorcing her husband A. P. Carter, Sarah Carter of the Carter Family remarried in 1939. The man she married was A. P. Carter's cousin.

  • Julie Fudge is the daughter of Patsy Cline and Hubby Charlie Dick.

  • Hank Williams talked Lefty Frizzell into joining the Grand Ole Opry. Lefty joined, but didn't like anything about the Opry, and soon quit.

  • In December 1957 while drunk on wine, Merle Haggard, and his friend Mickey, thinking it was the wee-hours of the morning, attempted to burglarize a restaurant. The restaurant, "Freddy G's" in Bakersfield, California, was still open for business. Merle tore one of the back doors off its hinges, and began to pry open the remaining door, when the owner opened it from the inside. The owner, who knew Merle, said, "Why don't you boys come around to the front door like everyone else?" The owner called the police. Merle's wife and baby were waiting in the car, as Merle and his friend ran away down the alley. Both men were caught and convicted of the felony. Merle escaped from the Bakersfield jail a short time later. After he was captured and tried, Merle was sentenced to San Quentin Prison.

  • Elvis Presley debuted on the Louisiana Hayride on October 9, 1954, with Scotty Moore and Bill Black as sidemen. Elvis was nineteen years old. The Saturday night prior to coming to the Hayride, Elvis debuted on the Grand Ole Opry and was not received well by the audience or by Jim Denny, the Opry manager. Denney suggested to Elvis that he should go back to Memphis and return to his old job as a truck driver. Elvis was a huge hit at the Hayride. Jim Denny was fired as manager of the Opry for conflict of interest.

  • Martha Sharp, Warner Brothers Records executive, discovered Faith Hill at Nashville's Bluebird Cafe in 1991. A short time later Faith signed a Developemental deal with the record label.

  • Waylon Jennings debuted on the charts with "That's The Chance I'll Have To Take," August 21, 1965.

  • Toby Keith's father, age 67, was killed in a hit & run auto accident on March 24, 2001. The incident occurred on I 35 outside Norman, Oklahoma. The female driver of the hit and run vehicle was located and arrested.

  • Buck Owens played steel guitar in a band called "Mac's Skillet Lickers" in the early days.

  • In 1939 Irving Berlin composed a Christmas song but thought so little of it that he never showed it to anybody. He just tossed it into a trunk and didn't see fit to retrieve it until he needed it for a Bing Crosby-Fred Astaire movie, HOLIDAY INN ten years later. Bing Crosby was a staunch Catholic and at first refused to sing the song because he felt it tended to commercialize Christmas. He finally agreed, took eighteen minutes to make the recording, and then the "throw-away" song become an all-time hit. Crosby's version has sold over 40 million copies. All together, this song has appeared in 750 versions, selling 6 million copies of sheet music and 90,000,000 recordings, just in the United States and Canada. You might not recognize the song from the movie HOLIDAY INN ... or from the composer's name of Irving Berlin. But you're bound to know it because it's on everyone's list of Christmas favorites: WHITE CHRISTMAS.



    From The Wisdom Desk:
    Thank you for voting on November 2nd. I urge you to pray for America, and for our troops wherever they may be. We also need to pray for our President. Difficult times are in our future, including wars, and rumors of wars. Bible believing Christians know what faces us in the near future. They know, because they've read the Bible, and it reads like todays newspaper headlines. If you haven't read a "Good Book" lately, I recommend that you read the book that God wrote. See you next year - good Lord willing and the creek don't rise.



    Bill's Favorite Music Links:

    http://rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/index.htm
    http://www.etrecordshop.com
    http://rockabillyhall.com/BillMorrison.html
    http://www.blueridgeopry.com/artists.html
    http://www.countrymusicclassics.com
    http://www.countryweekly.com
    http://www.google.com
    http://www.liveradio.netv
    http://www.musicreview.com
    http://www.radiohof.org
    http://www.stararchive.com
    http://www.whodoesthatsong.com
    http://www.wsmonline.com
    www.ifco.org/links.html
    http://www.countryhall.com
    http://www.roysamazinglinks.com
    http://www.oldiesmusic.com/index.html
    http://www.talentondisplay.com/country calendar.html




    "NOVEMBER"
    Volume 16
    October 25, 2004 ©Bill Morrison

    This months issue of Rockabilly Country News & Views is dedicated to my friend George Morgan. George joined the Grand Ole Opry on October 16, 1948, and was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1998. I last saw his tail lights, in the midst of a snow storm, while driving south through Chicago on Interstate 294. We were returning to Nashville, after a very long winter tour in 1973.
    George Morgan 1924-1975


    Quote of the Month
    "The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." Hunter S. Thompson


    RCNV tip of the month:
    If you're a fan of country music from the 1950's thru the 1980's - back when country music was 'REALLY' country - then subscribe to Country Music Classics -- a F R E E weekly email newsletter all about classic country music ... stories behind the songs - questions and answers ... win FREE CD's & cassettes and more! To subscribe ... send blank email to: Classics@countrymusicclassics.com and type "SUBSCRIBE" in the subject line.


    RCNV Spotlight
    I received an e-mail this week from a long-time friend in Illinois. Joe McCubbins, played drums in my band, and worked the road with me for a long time. I hadn't heard from Joe for over thirty years, and it made my heart happy to see his name on an e-mail. Within forty-eight hours of exchanging e-mail with Joe, I heard from two other very good musicians in the mid-west. Pat Richardson, who now entertains the Rose Bowl crowd in Urbana, Illinois, filled me in on some old pickers I use to know. I sat in with Sonny Norman many times at the Rose Bowl, in the 1960's. Russ Woolen also sent his regards. Russ continues to entertain audiences and is involved with recording and publishing. Thank you gentlemen for your kind words, and the fond memories you rekindled. I will never forget you, or the music.


    November Highlights

  • Roy Acuff visited his friend Minnie Pearl, as she was recovering from a stroke on 11/1/1992. The last words he spoke to Minnie, as he left the room were "I'll see you In Heaven, Minnie." Mr. Acuff died three weeks later.

  • Willie Nelson and Shirley Collie divorced on 11/2/1971.

  • Jimmie Rodgers, Fred Rose, and Hank Williams, were the first inductees into the Country Music Hall of Fame on 11/3/1961.

  • Will Rogers gave his debut performance at Nashville's Ryman Auditorium on 11/4/1925.

  • Johnny Horton, age 35, star of the Louisiana Hayride, died in a car wreck near Milano, Texas on 11/5/1960. Horton was hit head-on by a drunk driver while returning home after an appearance in Texas.

  • Elvis Presley and his parents signed a one-year contract with the Louisiana Hayride on 11/6/1954. Elvis would receive $18.00 for every Saturday night, and Bill Black and Scotty Moore, would receive $12.00 each. Elvis' parents were required to sign the contract because Elvis was not of age.

  • Marty Robbins drove in his final NASCAR race on 11/7/1982.

  • Alison Krauss and guitarist Pat Bergeson married on 11/8/1997.

  • Roy Acuff became the first "living" member, inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame on 11/9/1962.

  • David "Stringbean" Akeman and wife Estelle were murdered in a robbery at their rural home near Nashville, on 11/10/1973. The two robbers were waiting for them, as they returned home from an appearance on the Grand Ole Opry.

  • Johnny and June Carter Cash attended the Watergate trial in Washington D.C. at the invitation of Federal prosecutor James Neal on 11/11/1974.

  • Elvis Presley was voted "Most Promising Country and Western Artist," by Billboard magazine on 11/12/1955.

  • Jerry Lee Lewis Jr. died 11/13/1973.

  • Time Magazine coined the phrase "Nashville Sound," in an article published on 11/14/1960.

  • Wynonna made her acting debut on TV's "Touched By An Angel," on 11/15/1998.

  • Bob Wills and The Texas Playboys, played their last show together in the Will Rogers Auditorium in Ft. Worth, Texas on 11/16/1986.

  • Gordon Lightfoot born Orilla, Ontario, Canada on 11/17/1938.

  • Jerry Lee Lewis and wife Myra were divorced 11/18/1970.

  • The CMA Awards were broadcast from the Ryman Auditorium, on NBC-TV for the first time on 11/19/1968. The show was co-hosted by Roy Rogers and Dale Evans.

  • RCA paid SUN Records $35, 000.00 for Elvis Presley's recording contract on 11/20/1955. Elvis signed a three-year dear with RCA Victor the same day.

  • CMT doesn't get itŠ again. Charlie Daniels refused to accept CMT's decision not to allow him to perform his patriotic single "This Ain't No Rag, its A Flag" on their Country Freedom Concert on November 21, 2001. Charlie refused to appear on the show, and everybody in the United States LOST. The only winners were the Muslim terrorists. The problem arose when one of the CMT exec's decided one of the lines of the song might be offensive. "This ain't no rag it's a Flag, and we don't wear it on our heads." Country Music isn't the only thing that died in Nashville; these newcomers have also murdered common sense. If Traditional Country music fans knew what CMT thinks of real country, not one of them would ever watch the VH1 owned Country Music Television. Did you know ... CMT contacts Record Labels and tells them which artists, or CD's, not to make videos on, because they are too country? Well, now you know. CMT ... you're about as country as Dick Clark, and Kid Rock ... and they're NOT.

  • Lorrie Morgan and Keith Whitley married 11/221986.

  • Spade Cooley, age 58, died in Vacaville, California, on 11/23/1969, while serving a prison sentence for beating his wife to death in front of their daughter.

  • Loretta Lynn's mother Clara Webb Butcher, died 11/24/1981.

  • Tanya Tucker and her piano player (Tony Brown,) were drinking in a Nashville bar on 11/25/1976. After a few hours, Tanya left the bar and wrecked the car she was driving, almost killing herself. Tanya's father fired Brown, and a short time later, Tony Brown was Elvis Presley's piano player.

  • Hawkshaw Hawkins and Jean Shepard married on stage, in Wichita, Kansas 11/26/ 1960.

  • Guitarist James "Jimmy" Wiedner," was shot and killed in a hold-up in Downtown Nashville 11/27/1973. Jimmy was Hank Snow's lead guitar player, and my friend. My wife and I spoke with Jimmy shortly before he was murdered.

  • November 28, 1925 George D. Hay presented the debut broadcast of "The WSM Barn Dance," later to be re-named "The Grand Ole Opry." The broadcast originated from the WSM studio. Fiddler, Uncle Jimmy Thompson, was the first artist to perform.

  • Ray Smith, SUN recording artist, died in Burlington, Ontario 11/29/1979.

  • Kitty Wells, age 18, married Johnny Wright on 11/30/1937.


    Q. and A.
    Aaron D. writes from Covington, Georgia ...
    Q: I read in a magazine that Roy Acuff was buried on the same day he died. I didn't know that was possible. Do you know what really happened?
    A:  Roy Acuff, age 89, was buried on November 23, 1992. Roy's burial took place less than eight hours after his death, as he had requested. He passed away at 2:35 AM in his sleep, as the result of congestive heart disease. Roy Acuff was the first vocalist featured on The Grand Ole Opry, and the first "living" member, inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. Aaron, Mr. Acuff was the stabilizing force that kept the Grand Ole Opry a Traditional Country Music Show for decades. When Gaylord took over, real country music died a painful death, and the mess you see, and hear, on the Opry today is the result. Nothing lasts forever (except Jesus,) but I sure do miss watching that big red curtain go up on Saturday night, and watching Mr. Roy open another show of "The Grand Ole Opry."
    If you have a music related question you'd like to ask, send it to: BillMorrison2002@hotmail.com.


    Before They Were Stars:

    Max D Barnes was a truck driver, carpenter, and farmhand.

    The Big Bopper "Jiles Perry Richardson Jr." worked as a deejay at KTRM radio in Beaumont, Texas. He quit the radio station in December 1958, in order to play show dates promoting his hit "Chantilly Lace." Two months later he died in a plane crash with Buddy Holly. J. P. wrote the George Jones hit "White Lightnin'. "

    Mary Chapin Carpenter spent two years in Japan, graduated from Brown University, and sang in the Washington D. C. coffeehouses.

    Terri Clark worked in a Chinese Restaurant, and sang with Tootsie's house band on Lower Broadway, in Nashville.

    Freddie Hart joined the U. S. Marines, and fought at Iwo Jima and Okinawa during WW II.

    Kris Kristofferson was a Rhodes scholar who was offered a teaching position at West Point, but resigned his commission in the Army to become a songwriter. In Nashville, he worked as a janitor for Columbia Records. Kris will be inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame later this year.

    Lorrie Morgan debuted on the Grand Ole Opry at age 13, and traveled on the road with her father, George Morgan. In the latter stages of her career Lorrie has become a professional bride, and an eternal optimist.

    Jamie O'Neal toured with her parents group, "The Murphy Family."

    Carl Smith, was a singer, guitarist, and bass player in the "Brewster Brothers" band. He Later played in "Archie Campbell's" band.

    Ray Charles, a.k.a. Ray Charles Robinson, was blinded at age seven. Ray grew up in Greensville, Florida. At a young age he played piano in a country band in Florida. One of his earliest recordings on the Atlantic label was a cover of Hank Snow's "I'm Movin' On." Ray Charles brought throngs of new fans to the country music scene.


    Stage Names

    Arkie The Arkansas Woodchopper is Luther Ossenbrink.
    Ray Benson is Ray Benson Siefert.
    Patsy Cline is Virginia Patterson Hensley.
    Col. Tom Parker is Andreas Cornelis vanKuijk.
    Collin Raye is Floyd Collin Wray.
    Johnny Rodriguez is Juan Raoul Davis Rodriguez.
    Tammy Wynette is Virginia Wynette Pugh.
    Elton Britt is James Elton Baker.
    Thumbs Carllile is Kenneth Ray Carllile.
    Tommy Collins is Leonard Raymond Sipes.


    RCNV News Flash:

    There are only two kinds of music .. GOOD and BAD!!! Having said that, it is a terrible thing to represent yourself as being an apple, if you're really an orange, or a Rabbit, if you're really a Rat.
                 Music Row, the CMA, CMT, and now, even our beloved Grand Ole Opry, represent themselves as purveyors of Country Music. They are liars, and pretenders. We know what Country Music is. The artists of Country Music, sing country songs, are backed by country instruments, wear clean dress clothes on stage, and they don't think it's cute to see how many filthy words they can say over the microphone. And the female country singer doesn't feel the need to expose her body parts, in order to become a successful singer.
                 If you want to sell pop music, there is nothing wrong with that. Young people love pop music. But STOP calling it Country Music. It isn't Country, and we're not stupid. And we're alsoŠnot buying your productŠor attending your shows. (The Grand Ole Opry moves from the new Opry House, to the Ryman Auditorium every fall and winter, because they can't sell enough seats to fill even the lower section of the Opry House, let alone the balcony.)
                 We also know you don't care about, or need, the fans of Traditional Country Music. But all of you "Country Music Pretenders" can count on one thing. We will never let you rest, or become too comfortable. Only old age, and death, will tear from our memories the sights and sounds of real Country Music.
                 We've seen the big red curtain open and Roy Acuff standing center stage, wearing his white shoes, and swinging his fiddle bow, and wearing that tremendous smile on his face. We've shed tears while listening to Kitty, Hank, Webb, Lefty, George, Stonewall, Whisperin' Bill, and so many others. We've heard "Hoowwwwwwwwwdy," and loved the wonderful lady that was hollering a welcome to everyone in the audience. It sounded like she loved us with every fiber of her being ... because she really did. 
                 The memory of seeing Carl Smith, being inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2003, and not allowing him to go on stage to receive the award, or to thank his fans, is seared into our memories. We won't forget that, and we won't let the Country Music Association forget it either.


    Did You Know?

    In 1960, Jud Phillips, brother of Sam Phillips, quit SUN Records and started his own label "Judd Records." One of the artists on that label was my friend Joe Heathcock. Joe played the part of Sheriff, in The Last Picture Show. He also baby-sat my six year old son Tom, while my daughter Susie, was being born at Baptist Hospital in Nashville, in 1973.

    Speaking of daughter Susi ... Susan Morrison Hill, my favorite songwriter in Nashville, had five of her songs released on one CD a few weeks ago. Randy Kohrs and Lonesome Day Records www.lonesomeday.com, released "I'm Torn" on September 28th. One of the songs on the CD was a duet with Dolly Parton. Tracks 6 thru 10 were written by Susie and Randy, and are something special. Susie writes the words ... and Randy writes some dynamite music. You can get your copy of "I'm Torn" at Wal Mart, K Mart, and Target, as well as all good Record Stores around the world.

    Drummer, D. J. Fontana was added to Elvis Presley's band in May 1955. The other band members were Scotty Moore on lead guitar, and Bill Black on bass. Prior to joining Elvis' band, D. J. Fontana was a staff drummer on the Louisiana Hayride. D. J. played on my Empire Record releases back in the 70's. The sessions were produced by Joe Melson, and or, Ernie Ashworth. I believe that D. J. Fontana will soon be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and I like that idea a lot.

    Billboard renamed their "Hillbilly" music chart, the "Country & Western" chart in 1950.

    Johnny Horton and Billie Jean Williams (Hank Williams's widow,) married on September 28, 1953.

    Randy Travis and wife Lib were traveling in a limo, from LAX to their California home, when the limo driver suffered a heart attack and died while driving, on September 27, 1998. Randy climbed into the front seat and brought the vehicle under control. All attempts to revive the driver were unsuccessful.

    The National Life and Accident Insurance Company purchased the Ryman Auditorium, and renamed it the "Grand Ole Opry House," in 1963. The purchase price was $207,500.

    "The Wreck of the Old 97," was inspired by a train wreck near Danville, VA on September 27, 1903.

    Hank Williams signed a three-year contract, with the Louisiana Hayride in September 1952.

    Jim Denny, manager of the Grand Ole Opry, was fired for conflict of interest in September 1956.

    Elvis Presley, Tammy Wynette, George Morgan, and E.W. " Bud" Wendell, were inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame 1998.

    Steve Scruggs, age 34, youngest son of Earl Scruggs, died of gunshot wounds on September 23, 1992.

    Everly Brothers played their first concert together in ten years on September 22, 1983.

    The George D. Hay Hall of Fame in Mammoth, AR, inducted; Bill Monroe, Jimmy Martin, Conway Twitty, Ernie Ashworth, Jeannie Seely, George Hamilton IV, Jimmy C. Newman, Barbara Fairchild and Clyde Moody in 2003. 

    Jim Croce killed in a plane crash while on tour, in Louisiana on September 20, 1973.

    Gram Parsons died in Joshua Tree, California, on September 19, 1973 from a drug overdose. A few days later, Gram's manager "Phil Coffman," stole the body from the local airport. The body was driven to Joshua Tree National Park by Coffman, soaked in gasoline, and cremated on the ground. Coffman was arrested, and paid a $300 misdemeanor fine, for the theft of the casket. Welcome to the far left coast.


    From the Wisdom Desk:

    America is in the midst of their second, and final, Civil War. This time the stakes are even higher. This war is between Good and Evil. Same sex marriage is the issue that will determine whether or not God allows the United States to survive. The battle will be won, or lost, on November 2, 2004. The choices are clear ... why not help the army that you support win the battle with your vote. And remember friends, the Creator is watching.


    Bill's Favorite Music Links:
    http://rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/index.htm
    http://www.etrecordshop.com
    http://rockabillyhall.com/BillMorrison.html
    http://www.blueridgeopry.com/artists.html
    http://www.clabranson.com
    http://www.countrymusicclassics.com
    http://www.countryweekly.com
    http://www.google.com
    http://www.liveradio.netv
    http://www.musicreview.com
    http://www.radiohof.org
    http://www.stararchive.com
    http://www.whodoesthatsong.com
    http://www.wsmonline.com
    www.ifco.org/links.html
    http://www.countryhall.com
    http://www.oldiesmusic.com/index.html
    http://www.talentondisplay.com/country calendar.html






    "OCTOBER"
    Volume 15
    September 27, 2004 ©Bill Morrison

    The October issue of RCNV is dedicated to Grand Ole Opry members Skeeter Davis, and Roy Drusky. Skeeter, was born "Mary Francis Penick" on December 30, 1931 in Dry Ridge, Kentucky. Roy Frank Drusky Jr. was born June 22, 1930 in Atlanta, Georgia.
         Skeeter Davis, 1931-2004
         Roy Drusky, 1930-2004


    Quote of the Month

    "The roots of country music are intact, but there are only a few leaves left on the tree." ---Don Wasler


    RCNV Spotlight: James Burton
    continued from Volume 14.
                 Burton was hired to play on sessions with Merle Haggard and Buck Owens, in Bakersfield, California. As a result of those sessions, Burton is credited with helping to create the “Bakersfield sound.” On those sessions, he also met pedal steel player Ralph Mooney, with whom he would record his first solo album in 1969. In 1968, James was nominated for the Country Music Award for Best Lead Guitar player, but it would take 10 years, and 7 nominations, before he finally won the award.
                 Elvis called James in '69 to put together a band for his Las Vegas engagement, and James was happy to comply. Burton continued to play for Elvis until "The King's" untimely death in 1977.
                 Shortly before Presley's death, Burton received a call from John Denver. He hired James, to play a television special with him. During the taping, Denver asked if he wanted to do a European tour with him. James remained with Denver for 15 years. He was also part of Denver's Wildlife Concert in 1995.
                 In 1987, Roy Orbison did a highly acclaimed television special which was stunningly filmed in Black and White. Elvis' TCB Band was the back up band with James on lead. Other guests were, Elvis Costello, Bruce Springsteen, and Tom Waits, among others.
                 In the 90's, James was seriously injured in an accident. He fell out of a tree while cutting off a limb, and broke both ankles in the fall. A plate, and a half-dozen screws were needed to repair his left ankle, while two long screws were inserted into his right ankle. While in the hospital, James went into a coma that lasted for 10 days. Fortunately, he recovered and is now doing fine.
                 James currently makes frequent appearances at fan club conventions, mostly in Europe. But in 2001 came the recognition he should have received years ago; James was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, in March 2001. Keith Richards, Rolling Stones guitarist and long time Burton fan, inducted James.


    October Highlights

    Bonnie Owens, born "Bonnie Campbell" in Blanchard, OK on 10/1/1932. Bonnie, is the former wife of Buck Owens, and Merle Haggard. She is currently being treated for Alzheimer's disease.

    An attempt was made to steal Elvis Presley’s body, from its burial place in Memphis, on 10/2/1977. The family had the bodies of Elvis, and Gladys Presley moved to Graceland, where they are buried side by side.

    Eddie Cochran, Rockabilly pioneer, born Albert Lea, MN on 10/3/1938.

    Tammy Wynette reported to police, that she had been kidnapped at a Nashville Mall on 10/4/1978. Years later, she admitted that the story was not true.

    Billy Lee Riley, Sun Records/Rockabilly legend, born Pocahontas, AR on 10/5/1933.

    Faith Hill and Tim McGraw were married in Rayville, LA on 10/6/1996.

    Merle Haggard and Leona Williams married on 10/7/1978.

    Trace Adkins was injured, on 10/8/2002, when the tractor he was riding, rolled over, pinning him to the ground. Just a few of the injuries sustained by Trace, prior to joining the Grand Ole Opry in 2003: Nose severed in vehicle accident; left finger cut off in the oil fields, shot through the heart by an ex-wife. There are more, but space is so limited.

    Elvis Presley and Priscilla were divorced on 10/9/1973.

    James Cecil “Little Jimmy” Dickens inducted Country Music Hall of Fame on 10/10/1983.

    Tex Williams, age 68, died on 10/11/1985.

    John Denver, age 53, died when the plane he was flying crashed into the Pacific Ocean, near Monterey, CA on 10/12/1997.

    Minnie Pearl, age 63, was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame on 10/13/1975.

    Natalie Maines of the Dixie Chicks, was hatched on 10/14/1974, in President George Bush’s state of Texas. Natalie is a member of the ACLU.

    Hank Williams, and former girl friend Bobbie Jett, signed an agreement indicating that Hank, and his mother Lillie, would be responsible for Bobbie's unborn child on 10/15/1952. The child was named Cathy, and later "Jett Williams." Bobbie Jett died in 1974.

    Elvis Presley debuted on the Louisiana Hayride on 10/16/1954.

    Tennessee Ernie Ford became ill, after attending a state dinner at the White House, and died in Reston, VA on 10/17/1991.

    Hank Williams married Billie Jean Jones Eshliman, in Minden, Louisiana on 10/18/1952. The following day they repeated the wedding in two separate public ceremonies. After his death, a judge ruled the wedding was not legal due to the fact that Billie Jean's divorce did not become final until eleven days after she married Hank.

    The CMA Awards Show made its debut in Nashville on 10/19/1967. The show was not televised.

    Lynyrd Skynyrd’s plane crashed, killing six band members and back-up singers on 10/20/1977.

    Gene Vincent, age 36, died in California on 10/21/1971. A Federal Judge ruled in Atlanta on 10/22/1975, that Billie Jean's marriage to Hank Williams was valid, and 50% of Hank's future royalties belonged to her. A few days after the judge's decision, Audrey Williams died in her sleep, one day before the IRS was scheduled to seize her home.

    Mother Maybelle Carter, age 68, died on 10/23/1978. She was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1970.

    J. P. Richardson, "The Big Bopper," born Sabine Pass, TX on 10/24/1930.

    Roger Miller died in California on 10/25/1992, after losing his battle with throat cancer. Roger was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1973, and the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1995.

    Hoyt Axton, age 61, singer/songwriter/actor, died in Victor, MT on 10/26/1999.

    The Grand Ole Opry moved from WSM’s Studio C, to Nashville's Hillsboro Theatre, on 10/27/1934. The Hillsboro seated 2,400 people, and for the first time the stars would have dressing rooms. At this time the artists were instructed to wear costumes on the show. The opening night at the Hillsboro Theatre was Vito Pellettiere’s debut as the Opry's first stage manager. Mr. Pellettiere's contribution to the success of the Opry, over the next forty years cannot be overstated.

    Brenda Lee recorded "Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree" at Owen Bradley's Quonset Hut studio on 10/28/1958. The session musicians were; Buddy Harmon on drums, Grady Martin and Hank Garland on guitar, Floyd Cramer on Piano, Bob Moore on stand-up bass, and Harold Bradley on electric bass.

    Elvis recorded his last hit, "Way Down," in his Graceland Studio on 10/29/1976.

    Kitty Wells, age 18, married Johnny Wright in Nashville, on 10/30/1937.

    Dale Evans was born in Uvalde, TX on 10/31/1912.


    Q. & A.
    Linda Harwood writes from Hawaii with the following question:
    Q: A friend told me that Andy Griggs was put in prison about two years ago. Is that true, and can you tell me what he did?
    A: Your friend is confused Linda. Andy Griggs was arrested in Tallahassee, Florida on February 16, 2001, along with a member of his band. They reportedly stole an ambulance and took it for a joyride. The two men were charged with felony "Grand Theft Auto." However, Andy Griggs is not in prison.
    If you have a music related question you’d like to ask, send it to: BillMorrison2002@hotmail.com


    Before They Were Stars
    Gary Allan worked in the construction industry.
    Deana Carter was a janitor, and waitress.
    Rita Coolidge was a university student, and back-up singer.
    Al Dexter owned a tavern in Texas.
    Merle Haggard worked on farms, orchards, and the oil fields, and washed dishes.
    Harlan Howard served four years as a paratrooper in the U. S. Army.
    Chris LeDoux was a World Champion Bareback Rider.
    Ronnie McDowell served in the U.S. Navy.
    Molly O’Day worked in radio under the name “Mountain Fern.”
    Randy Travis worked as a short order cook at the Nashville Palace Resort.



    Stage Names (Movie stars)
    Lauren Bacall is Betty Joan Persky.
    Milton Berle is Milton Berlinger.
    Victor Borge is Borge Rosenbaum.
    Mel Brooks is Melvin Kaminsky.
    Cyd Charisse is Tula Ellice Finklea.
    Robert Conrad is Conrad Robert Falk.
    Troy Donahue is Merle Johnson Jr.
    Dale Evans is Frances Octavia Smith.
    Billy Holliday is Eleanor Fagan.
    Howard Keel is Harold Leek.


    RCNV News Flash

    Kris Kristofferson, will be the next artist inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame, at this years CMA Awards Show…and it's about time. The show will be aired November 9th on CBS. Vince Gill will not be hosting this years show, Brooks & Dunn will host for the first time. Lets hope that CMA Executive Director Ed Benson, will be intelligent enough to allow Kristofferson, to address the fans from the stage. (I'm not holding my breath.) Last year, the CMA showed their true feelings about the Traditional Country artists, when Carl Smith, one of the all time greats of Country Music, was not allowed to come on stage after announcing him as the newest inductee into the Country Music Hall of Fame. They did however, allow Carl Smith to wave to the fans, while standing in front of his seat. Ed Benson…you are a disgrace to Country Music. And by the way...the name of your organization should be changed from The Country Music Association, to the Country Rock And Pop Association, or “CRAP.”

    Randy Kohrs' latest CD "I'm Torn" was released by Lonesome Day Records on September 28th. This is Randy’s best effort to date, and features a duet with former boss Dolly Parton "It Looked Good On Paper," and five songs written by my daughter Susan Hill. Pick up a copy at Wal Mart or contact Lonesome Day Records at 606-398-2369.


    Did You Know?

    Elvis recorded, "Heartbreak Hotel," at his first RCA Nashville recording session on January 10, 1956. Three months later, the record became the first No. 1 of Elvis' career.

    Willie Nelson appeared in an episode of "Miami Vice," playing the part of a Texas Ranger on November 7, 1986.

    While serving a ten day jail sentence for Aggravated DUI in an Arizona jail, Glen Campbell treated approximately 1,000 prisoners, to a free concert in August 2004. Despite his best efforts, Glen continues to struggle with his demons.

    Justin Tubb, age 20, became the youngest ever, member of the Grand Ole Opry on September 10, 1955.

    Delia "Mom" Upchurch "Den Mother of Nashville Stars" was born in Gainesboro, TN in 1891. Mom ran a rooming "home" for Nashville’s financially challenged music community, at 620 Boscobel Street for over two decades. The singers, songwriters, and musicians paid what they could afford for their room. No one paid more than ten dollars a week. The lucky ones who got to work the road, never missed a call. Mom was the message taker, and coordinated everyone's calendar. Mom died September 1, 1976. Mom and Tootsie Bess, of Tootsie's Orchid Lounge fame, sustained many careers long enough for them to blossom.

    Roy Rogers is the only person to have been elected twice to the Country Music Hall of Fame. He founded the "Sons of the Pioneers" and as a member of that group was elected to the CMHF in 1980. Roy was elected to the CMHF as an individual, in 1989.

    The night Hank Snow joined the Opry; Hank Williams introduced him on stage.

    Never in the history of the Grand Ole Opry have they ever created a star, or launched a career. The Louisiana Hayride created dozens of stars and launched hundreds of careers.

    Hee Haw was born in Nashville, Tennessee in 1969, as a replacement for The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour. A total of 585 episodes were filmed. The show was filmed twice a year, 13 episodes at a time.

    Brooks & Dunn's first single "Brand New Man" went to No. 1 in September 1991. Their second single "My Next Broken Heart," hit No. 1 three months later on December 21, 1991. The only other artists to match this feat: Lefty Frizzell, Donna Fargo, Freddy Fender, and Clint Black.

    Buddy Holly produced Waylon Jennings’ first recording session.

    Buck Owens dropped out of school in the 9th grade, and never returned.

    Roy Drusky is being treated for lung cancer, and Bonnie Owens for Alzheimer’s disease.

    One afternoon in 1956, after his television and radio had been repossessed, Don Gibson sat in his house trailer near Knoxville, TN and wrote two songs. "I Can’t Stop Loving You" and "Oh Lonesome Me." Don sent the songs to Chet Atkins at RCA in Nashville, and Chet immediately signed Don to RCA. RCA released "Oh, Lonesome Me" on February 17, 1958 and it went straight to No. 1 and stayed there for eight weeks. “I Can’t Stop Loving You” went top-10 for Don and went on to be one of the most recorded songs in country music history.


    From The Wisdom Desk:

    I came very close to dying on September 22nd. What I'm about to tell you comes from my heart, and this may be the last opportunity I have to talk to you about this subject.

    There is more hatred in the world today, than at any time in history. It is not conservative Vs- liberal, poor vs- rich, white vs- black, democracy vs- dictatorship. In case you haven’t figured it out, it is 100%, good vs- evil, God vs-Satan. The Bible explains it all, and identifies all of the players, and how it all ends. It is, what it is my friends…the scripture refers to it as the end times. I urge those of you who know how to pray, to pray for America, and for the peace of Jerusalem. The hate, and the killing, will not stop until there is perfect peace in Jerusalem. It will come, but between now and then, some very bad things are going to happen. I pray for you, the readers of this monthly column, because I care about you. For those of you who know how to pray, I ask that you would pray for me, and my loved ones. And please…stop the hating! Have a great month, and the good Lord willin' I’ll see you next month.



    Bill’s Favorite Music Links:

    http://rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/index.htm
    http://www.etrecordshop.com
    http://rockabillyhall.com/BillMorrison.html
    http://www.blueridgeopry.com/artists.html
    http://www.clabranson.com
    http://www.countrymusicclassics.com
    http://www.countryweekly.com
    http://www.google.com
    http://www.liveradio.netv
    http://www.musicreview.com
    http://www.radiohof.org
    http://www.stararchive.com
    http://www.whodoesthatsong.com
    http://www.wsmonline.com
    http://www.ifco.org/links.html
    http://www.countryhall.com
    http://www.oldiesmusic.com/index.html
    http://www.talentondisplay.com/country calendar.html





    "SEPTEMBER"
    Volume 14
    July 27, 2004 ©Bill Morrison

    This Month's RCNV is dedicated to the Memory of Ersel Hickey. 1934-2004

    RCNV Spotlight: James Burton
                 James Burton was born in Dubberly, Louisiana, on August 21, 1939, but he grew up in Shreveport. His first guitar was a Rex, then a Stella, but it was in a J&S Music store in Shreveport where he first saw the '53 Fender Telecaster and knew that this was the guitar for him. He used to listen to KWKH in Shreveport. Through KWKH, Burton was exposed to Chet Atkins, Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, Elmore James, Lightnin' Hopkins, and many more. At age 14, Burton went professional, working club gigs and private parties. He would skip school just to be able to play guitar.
                 Money was something he didn't think about, it was just for the thrill of playing. To play in those clubs, you had to go to the police station to get a permit if you were underage. Horace Logan was the producer of the Louisiana Hayride and he asked if James wanted to do some shows and join the staff band. James was 14 at the time. At the Hayride, he played behind guys like George Jones, Jimmy and Johnny, Billy Walker and Johnny Horton. He remained with the Hayride for about a year. He became fascinated with the steel guitar. He and Hayride steel guitar player Sonny Trammell would switch licks, James would play steel licks and Trammell would play guitar licks. His interest in steel guitar would later led him to pursue the slide Dobro.
                 Before recording the song that would put him on the map forever, Burton recorded with a few local artists at Mira Smith's RAM Records in Shreveport. There he recorded many songs with artists like Joe Osborne, Joe then still playing guitar instead of bass, James Wilson, with whom he made his recording debut on lead guitar, Leon Post, Charlotte Hunter and Larry Lincoln, with whom he formed the band Larry Bamburg and The Louisiana Drifters. All these recordings can be found on the album Shreveport High Steppers.
                 In '55 James was playing with the Dale Hawkins band. They recorded a demo tape of "See You Soon Baboon" at the KWKH studio. The owner of Stan's Record Shop, Stan Lewis, was impressed and signed them to a management deal and hawked them to Chess Records. In '57, Burton recorded "Suzie Q" with Dale Hawkins. Burton wrote the lick and Hawkins put the lyrics to it. After he left Hawkins, Burton was playing around town when he got a call from Horace Logan, manager of the Hayride and also Bob Luman. Logan felt that Luman had the style and look and he knew Burton had the licks to complement him. Burton, James Kirkland and Luman tested the waters on a few Hayride shows and then started to work together. With a few hit singles released like "My Gal is Red Hot" and "A Red Cadillac and A Black Mustache, Logan arranged for the band to do a movie in Hollywood, called "Carnival Rock."
                 Logan also made sure that Bob Luman and The Shadows, as the band was now called, had a semi regular spot on Town Hall Party.
                 While in Hollywood with Luman, Ricky Nelson heard them rehearse and shortly after that, James got a telegram, asking him and bass player James Kirkland to meet Ricky Nelson. They were offered to be on the Ozzie and Harriet show as Nelson's backing band. Both agreed to do it, and before Burton knew it, he was living with the Nelson's. Ozzie and Harriet had invited him to stay at their home. Burton lived there for about 2 years, before finding his own place.
                 During his time with Ricky, James performed at Town Hall Party together with Bob Luman. Burton's first recording with Nelson was "Waiting in School" / "Stood Up". Joe Maphis played lead and James played rhythm.
                 After this, Burton took over from Maphis and played on every record until 1967. "Believe What You Say" was Burton's first record with Nelson, on which he played lead. Burton's style of playing has always been very distinct. He uses a straight pick and a fingerpick on his middle finger. On this record, James replaced his first 4 strings with banjo strings and moved the A and D string up to D and E. He later had them gauged.
                 While working with Nelson, Burton also found time to record with Glen Campbell. Burton played Dobro on Campbell's 1963 album "Big Bluegrass Special". This is probably the first album on which Burton played Dobro. While taking a break from a session with Nelson, Burton and Joe Osborn (Nelson's bass player after James Kirkland left) recorded 3 instrumental songs. "Fireball Mail"/"Daisy Mae"/"Bimbo". The songs were released as singles on the Fabor label under the name "Jim and Joe". Also recorded in 1963 was Burton's solo single "Swamp Surfer"/"Everybody Listens to the Dobro". It was released under the name of Jimmy Dobro.
                 Still working with Nelson, Burton also found time to record with artists like Dean Martin, Bobby Darin and The Everly Brothers. Burton was under contract with Ricky Nelson, so he couldn't do much outside work. But because of his work with Ricky on songs like "Hello Mary Lou" and "Travelin' Man", Burton was an increasingly in-demand guitar player. In '65, Burton got a call from Johnny Cash to play Dobro on a TV pilot for a new musical show called "Shindig". Nelson wasn't too happy about the fact that Burton would leave him, but after a while, Nelson's manager gave Burton the go-ahead.
    (To be continued in the October issue of Rockabilly Country News & Views.)



    September Highlights

  • Fifth Avenue, between Broadway and Commerce in Nashville, was renamed "Opry Place," on 9/1/1962.

  • Connie Smith and Bob Luman joined the Grand Ole Opry on 9/2/1965.

  • Jim Reeves quit the Louisiana Hayride, and joined the Grand Ole Opry on 9/3/1955.

  • Dottie West died in a Nashville hospital on 9/4/1991. Dottie died as a result of injuries suffered in a car wreck on August 30th near the Grand Ole Opry House. Dottie was the first female Country Artist to win a Grammy. She won for "Here Comes My Baby."

  • The Country Music Association was chartered by the State of Tennessee, on 9/5/1958.

  • Ernest Tubb died in Nashville, TN on 9/6/1984. Inducted CMHF 1965, NSHF 1970 and the Texas CMHF 1999.

  • Charley Hardin Holley, "Buddy Holly," born Lubbock, Texas on 9/7/1936. Inducted R&RHF 1986, NSHF 1994.

  • Buck Owens played lead guitar on Tommy Collins first recording session, at Capitol Records, Melrose Avenue Studios, in Los Angeles on 9/8/1953. The first song recorded was "You Better Not Do That." The single became Collin's first hit, reaching No. 2 on the charts.

  • Roger Dale Tubb, son of Ernest Tubb, killed in a car wreck on 9/9/1938.

  • Rosie Flores, Rockabilly singer/guitarist, born San Antonio, TX 9/10/ 1950.

  • Barbara Mandrell was seriously injured in a car wreck in Hendersonville, TN on 9/11/1984. The driver of the other vehicle, Mark White, age 19, was killed when his auto crossed the centerline striking Barbara's vehicle head on. Both of Barbara's children were in the car with her.

  • Johnny Cash, age 71, died in Baptist Hospital, Nashville, TN on 9/12/2003. CMHF, R&RHF, NSHF.

  • Ben Smathers and The Stoney Mountain Cloggers joined the Grand Ole Opry, on 9/13/1958.

  • John Wayne Hill, singer/songwriter/guitarist/fiddler/, born 9/14/1964.

  • Roy Acuff, "The King of Country Music," born Maynardville, TN on 9/15/1903. Mr. Acuff was personally responsible for keeping the Grand Ole Opry "Country," until the day he died. He became the first living person to be inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame 1962.

  • Sheb Wooley, a.k.a. Ben Colder, age 82, died 9/16/2003.

  • Hank Williams born Mount Olive, AL on 9/17/1923. Hank became the third person to be elected to the Country Music Hall Of Fame 1961.

  • Connie Smith joined the Grand Ole Opry on 9/18/1965.

  • Gram Parsons died in Joshua Tree, CA on 9/19/1973, from a drug overdose. A few days later, Gram's manager "Phil Coffman," stole the body from the local airport. The body was driven to Joshua Tree National Park by Coffman, soaked in gasoline, and cremated on the ground. Coffman was arrested, and paid a $300.00 misdemeanor fine, for the theft of the casket.

  • Hank Williams returned to Shreveport, and the Louisiana Hayride on 9/20/1952.

  • Faith Hill born Jackson, MS on 9/21/1967. Faith was adopted on September 23, 1967 and named Audrey Faith Perry.

  • Willie Nelson's "Farm Aid," debuted on the campus of the University of Illinois on 9/22/1985.

  • Ray Charles, born "Ray Charles Robinson," Albany, GA 9/23/1930.

  • Jim Denny, manager of the Grand Ole Opry, was fired for conflict of interest, on 9/24/1956.

  • Little Jimmy Dickens joined the Grand Ole Opry on 9/25/1948.

  • Marty Robbins born near Glendale, AR on 9/26/1925. This recording star/NASCAR driver/Grand Ole Opry member, was elected to the NSHF 1975 and the CMHF 1982.

  • The National Life and Accident Insurance Company purchased the Ryman Auditorium, and renamed it the "Grand Ole Opry House," on 9/27/1963. The purchase price was $207,500.

  • Johnny Horton and Billie Jean Williams (Hank Williams's widow,) were married on 9/28/1953.

  • Jerry Lee Lewis shot his bass player, Norman Bush, in the chest with a 357 magnum on 9/29/1976. Norman survived the gunshot, and "The Killer," fired him. The police charged Lewis with a misdemeanor, Discharging a firearm inside the city limits. Go figure.

  • Billboard renamed their "Hillbilly" music chart, the "Country & Western" chart on 9/30/1950.

  • Check out the complete "On This Day In Music History Calendar" at: www.talentondisplay.com/countrycalendar.html. You can visit Bill Morrison's Hall of Fame page at: www.rockabillyhall.com/billmorrison.html



    What's Happening?

    The Del McCoury Band will perform during the International Bluegrass Music Association's Bluegrass Fan Fest in Louisville, Kentucky October 8th thru 10th. Other scheduled acts include Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver, J.D. Crowe & the New South, Laurie Lewis and Tom Rozum, Blue Highway, the Ronnie Bowman Committee, Dale Ann Bradley, BlueRidge, Larry Cordle & Lonesome Standard Time, and King Wilkie.



    Q. & A.

    Donna C. in Athens, Georgia writes with the following question:
    Q.  I would like to know if Alison Krauss is still married, and does she    have any kids?
    A.  Alison Krauss and Patrick Bergeson were divorced in August 2001. Bergeson was granted a lump sum alimony payment of $80,000, and ordered to pay $630.00 per month in child support, for the couple's two year old son. Thanks for the question Donna.
    If you have a music related question you'd like to ask, send it to: BillMorrison2002@hotmail.com.



    Before They Were Stars:

    Garth Brooks sold boots.
    Helen Cornelius worked as a secretary.
    Linda Davis recorded jingles for Dr. Pepper and Kentucky Fried Chicken.
    Dave Dudley was a deejay.
    Claude Gray served four years in the U. S. Navy.
    Goldie Hill sang on the Louisiana Hayride.
    Autry Inman worked in a cotton mill.
    Nicolette Larson was a back-up singer.
    Ronnie Milsap studio musician and back-up singer.
    Lee Roy Parnell was a rancher.



    Stage Names (Movie stars)

    Alan Alda is Alphonso D'Abruzzo.
    June Allyson is Ella Geisman.
    Brigette Bardot is Camille Javal.
    Irving Berlin is Israel Baline.
    Fanny Brice is Fanny Borach.
    Truman Capote is Truman Streckfus Persons.
    Yvonne De Carlo is Peggy Middleton.
    Vince Edwards is Vincent Edward Zoino.
    Cary Grant is Archibald Leach.
    Ben Kingsley is Krishna Banji.



    RCNV News Flash:

                 Country Radio, Music Row, CMT, and "GREED," has done everything in their power to destroy Traditional County Music. It seems to be working, and it is a very painful situation for the older country music fans.
                 However, America now faces some very powerful organizations, that want to completely destroy this once great nation. The A. C. L. U. and activist judges, would reform the United States, into what most European countries became decades ago ... a Godless society, with a future marked for destruction. The A. C. L. U. and these foolish judges, do not have any legal authority to do what they're doing. If you care about what is happening to our country...do something about it.
                 A second, and smaller threat would be the Muslim menace. If you, and I, deal with our new enemies, in the same manner as we dealt with the music industry ... we will lose everything, not just our music. Do not send me e-mail asking what you can do. You know how America works.
                 Contact your corrupt representatives in Washington. Tell them their job is in jeopardy. If they don't preserve the values, that this nation was founded on, tell them they should not expect to be reelected. That is the only thing our form of government understands. They will act ... if you make them aware of what you will do if they don't. If you are unwilling to do that, then you, and your grandchildren, deserve what I believe to be the inevitable fate of our nation. The choice is yours, and that my friend, is the scariest part of this entire scenario.



    Did You Know?

    Linda Parker, cast member of the WLS National Barn Dance, was born in Covington, Kentucky on January 18, 1912. Parker was the first female artist to have a successful solo career in country music.

    During a sixteen-month period ranging from March 5th, 1963 to July 31, 1964, the Grand Ole Opry Family lost the following:
    March 5, 1963, Patsy Cline, Cowboy Copas, Hawkshaw Hankins and Randy Hughes, died near Camden, Tennessee In a plane crash.
    March 7, 1963,Jack Anglin of "Johnny & Jack," was killed in a car wreck en route to Patsy Clines funeral.
    July 31, 1964,Jim Reeves and Dean Manuel were killed in a plane crash near Nashville.

    Radio station WXGI, in Richmond, Virginia banned Webb Pierce's #1 single, "There Stands The Glass," in 1953. The reason, the song was not suitable for their younger listening audience. Even radio stations had values fifty years ago.

    Elvis Presley was ordered to report for duty with the U. S. Army on January 20,1958. The Pentagon allowed him a sixty-day deferment so that he could finish the movie "King Creole."

    Alison Krauss and guitarist Pat Bergeson married on November 8, 1997.

    David Rogers, age 57, died November 9, 1993. His recording career produced 37 chart hits between (1968-1984.)

    Nashville police arrested Wynonna Judd on a DUI charge on November 12, 2003. Her blood alcohol level was more than twice the legal limit.

    Spade Cooley, age 58, died in Vacaville, California on November 23, 1969, while serving a prison sentence for beating his wife to death in front of their daughter.

    Guitarist James "Jimmy" Wiedner, was shot and killed in a hold-up in Downtown Nashville on November 27, 1973. Jimmy was Hank Snow's lead guitar player, and my very good friend.

    People Magazine reported in 2001, that Garth Brooks and ex-wife Sandy are sharing the same ranch in Oklahoma. Sandy and the three daughters, occupy a house trailer, until their new home is completed. Garth lives in a house on the ranch.



    From The Wisdom Desk:

    There is a God-shaped vacuum in the heart of every man, which cannot be filled by any created thing but only by God the Creator, made known through Jesus Christ. --Pascal



    Bill's Favorite Music Links:

    http://rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/index.htm
      http://www.etrecordshop.com
    http://rockabillyhall.com/BillMorrison.html
    http://www.blueridgeopry.com/artists.html
    http://www.clabranson.com
    http://www.countrymusicclassics.com
    http://www.countryweekly.com
    http://www.google.com
    http://www.liveradio.netv
    http://www.musicreview.com
    http://www.radiohof.org
    http://www.stararchive.com
    http://www.whodoesthatsong.com
    http://www.wsmonline.com
    www.ifco.org/links.html
    http://www.countryhall.com
    http://www.oldiesmusic.com/index.html
    http://www.talentondisplay.com/country calendar.html





    "AUGUST"
    Volume 13
    August 25, 2004 ©Bill Morrison

    This Month's RCNV is dedicated to the Memory of Ersel Hickey. 1934-2004

    RCNV Spotlight

    BOB LUMAN
    Bobby Glynn Luman was born in Nacogdoches, Texas on April 15, 1937. After winning a Talent Contest, judged by members of the Louisiana Hayride, Bob was invited to make a guest appearance on that show. Later, when Johnny Cash left the Hayride, Luman was chosen to replace him even though he was still in his teens.
                 Luman signed with Imperial Records in 1957. Bob put together a band in Shreveport with James Burton on guitar, Bruce White on drums, and James Kirkland on bass. The Rockabilly classic "Red Cadillac and a Black Mustache" was born at his first Imperial recording session. In a short time Bob had his own TV show in Shreveport.
                 Bob took the band to Hollywood to make the movie "Carnival Rock," and while there, he was offered a spot on the very popular "Town Hall Party" television show. Ricky Nelson heard Bob's band at this time and hired them away from Luman.
                 After leaving Imperial, Bob signed with Capitol Records, and later signed on with Warner Brothers. Bob's "Let's Think About Living" became a hit on both pop, and country charts.
                 When Bob moved to Nashville in 1964, he joined the Grand Ole Opry. The Opry was never the same after that. Bob was very hard to follow, after bringing the Ryman audience to a frenzy. Many old timers didn't like that at all, and they didn't try to hide it. Bob ruled the Ryman for a few years, and he kept all the seats filled every Saturday night.
                 In the fourteen years Bob lived in Nashville, he charted thirty-seven records. "Lonely Women Make Good Lovers" was the best seller.
                 We lost Bob Luman in 1978. He was 41 years old. I was Bob's opening act on some very exciting tours, in the late sixties, and early seventies. No one took better care of an audience than Bob Luman ... and I sure do miss him.


    August Highlights

  • Johnny Cash signed with Columbia Records 8/1/58.
  • Betty Jack Davis died in an auto accident 8/2/53.
  • Gordon Stoker " Jordanaires" born Gleason, TN 8/3/24.
  • George Jones joined the Grand Ole Opry 8/4/56.
  • Luther Perkins killed in a trailer fire in Tennessee 8/5/68 1968.
  • Colleen Carroll Brooks, age 70, recording artist/regular on Red Foley's Ozark Jubilee/ mother of Garth Brooks, died of throat cancer 8/6/68.
  • Johnny Cash and Vivian Liberto were married 8/7/54.
  • Hank Williams Jr. seriously injured in a fall on Montana's Ajax Mountain 8/8/75.
  • Bonnie Campbell joined Buck Owens band in 1947, when she was fifteen years old. They were married the following year, and she became Bonnie Owens. 8/9/54.
  • Leo Fender designed and manufactured the Telecaster and Stratocaster guitars, born 8/10/09.
  • Priscilla Presley filed for divorce from Elvis 8/11/72.
  • Eja Lange, firstborn of Shania Twain, and Mutt Lange, born 8/12/01.
  • Keith Whitley went to No. 1 with "Don't Close Your Eyes" 8/13/88.
  • Gladys Presley, Elvis' mother died 8/14/58.
  • Bobby Helms, Jingle Bell Rock/My Special Angel, born Bloomington, IN  8/15/33. Inducted Rockabilly Hall of Fame in 2003.
  • Elvis Presley, age 42, died in Memphis, 8/16/77. Inducted R&RHF 1986. CMHF 1998.
  • Charlie Rich's first SUN recording session in Memphis, 8/17/58.
  • Elvis Presley was buried beside his mother's grave in Forest Hill Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee, on 8/18/77. Both bodies would eventually be moved to Graceland, after an attempt to steal Elvis' body from his grave.
  • Dorsey Burnette, age 46, Rockabilly singer/songwriter, died 8/19/79.
  • John Hiatt, singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist born Indianapolis, IN 8/20/52.
  • James Burton, born Dubberly, LA, 8/21/39. Played guitar for Elvis Presley, Ricky Nelson, Bob Luman, Emmylou Harris and many other top names.
  • Dale Hawkins, Rockabilly singer/guitarist/songwriter, wrote and recorded "Suzie Q" born Goldmine, LA 8/22/38. Inducted Rockabilly Hall of Fame.
  • Jack Earls, Sun recording artist, born Woodbury, TN 8/23/32.
  • Waylon Jennings arrested for conspiracy, and possession of Cocaine 8/24/77.
  • Billy Joe Shaver suffered a heart attack after a performance in New Braunfels, TX 8/25/01.
  • Bobby Helms released "My Special Angel," 8/26/57.
  • Stevie Ray Vaughn died in a helicopter crash 8/27/90.
  • LeAnn Rimes, born Jackson, MS 8/28/82.
  • Charlie Feathers, pioneer Rockabilly artist, age 66, died Memphis, TN 8/29/98. Charlie was a favorite Rockabilly songwriter, of the stable of SUN recording artists. Rockabilly Hall of Fame inductee.
  • Dottie West seriously injured in a car wreck en route to the Grand Ole Opry 8/30/91. Dottie died from her injuries on September 4th, 1991.
  • The last broadcast of the WLS National Barn Dance from Chicago's Eighth Street Theater, was aired on 8/31/57.
  • There are 326 additional entries on Bill Morrison's "August" calendar. Check out the complete "On This Day In Music History Calendar" at: www.talentondisplay.com/countrycalendar.html. You can visit Bill Morrison's Hall of Fame page at: www.rockabillyhall.com/billmorrison.html


    What's Happening?

    Patty Griffin, Buddy Miller, Emmylou Harris, Gillian Welch and David Rawlings will spend most of August touring together as the Sweet Harmony Traveling Revue. The 14-city tour kicks off August 11 in Atlanta. Other cities on the itinerary include New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Denver and Salt Lake City. Ed Gregory Jr., who purchased the royalty rights, real estate and other assets related to country star Jim Reeves, died recently in Nashville. At the time of his death, he was being accused by the estate of Reeves' widow, Mary Reeves Davis, of coercing her to sell the property in 1996 for $7.3 million when she was suffering from senile dementia. Gregory also owned the memorabilia and royalty rights of Faron Young and sat on the board of Gene Autry's Museum of Western Heritage in Los Angeles. Gregory filed bankruptcy in 2002 for his businesses United Shows and Gregory Entertainment. In addition, he and his wife were pardoned by President Bill Clinton for the couple's 1986 bank fraud convictions.

    The Country Music Hall of Fame recently released Country's 20 Classic Gospel Songs of the Century on New Haven Records. The album includes previously released tracks from Vince Gill, Alison Krauss, Ricky Skaggs as well as the trio of Emmylou Harris, Dolly Parton and Linda Ronstadt, plus material from Hall of Fame members The Carter Family, Johnny Cash, Patsy Cline, Merle Haggard, Willie Nelson, Elvis Presley, Jim Reeves, Hank Williams and Tammy Wynette.

    Dwight Yoakam is one of the artists who paid homage to alt-country legend Gram Parsons, during weekend concerts this summer at Santa Barbara Bowl and at Los Angeles' Universal Amphitheatre. The concerts also featured Lucinda Williams, Norah Jones, Steve Earle, and Jim Lauderdale. Because she works nearly 300 dates a year on the road, Rhonda Vincent, mother to two teenage daughters, makes sure that on Mother's Day, her daughters have her undivided attention. Their wish becomes her command for that one special day. This year Rhonda received the ultimate challenge when daughter Tensel asked her mom to find a way to be at the Grand Ole Opry to see Keith Urban. The challenge was even harder because Vincent had only one day's notice and an extremely busy schedule in her own right. Still, Rhonda changed all her existing plans and flights at a moment's notice. Vincent and her daughters walked into the Grand Ole Opry House just as Urban walked on stage. After meeting Urban, Rhonda boarded the Martha White bus at midnight to travel to her Washington, D.C., appearance, and her daughters flew back to Missouri for school, clutching their personal photo of the singer/guitarist.

    After a four-year hiatus, multi-award winning superstar Faith Hill is set to return to the stage. The exclusive, four-show concert event, taking place at The Coliseum at Caesars Palace on August 10, 11, 13 and 14, will include all of the chart-topping singles from the Grammy Award-winning singer's career, ("Breathe," "This Kiss," "Let Me Let Go," "Piece Of My Heart," "The Way You Love Me" and "Cry," amongst others) which has seen the sale of more than 25 millions albums. The concerts are co-presented by Caesars Palace and AEG Live. RCNV doubts that Faith will be dedicating any songs to American Traitor Michael Moore.


    Q. & A.

    Wilma P. writes from New Cumberland, West Virginia, with the following question:
    Q.    Hi Bill, do you know what ever happened to Radio Dot? She sang on Cowboy Loyd's Show I think in the 40's or 50's on the radio. She was such a beautiful singer. I had the pleasure of meeting her once at the Wheeling Jamboree, and I can't find out whatever happened to her. Thanks for anything you can tell me.
    A.  "Radio Dot Henderson" sang with Cowboy Loye (Loye Donald Pack) on WWVA Wheeling in 1936. Their association ended when Loye left the show in 1937, and moved to WMMN in Fairmont. Cowboy Loye died on March 15, 1941 after ulcer surgery in Cleveland, Ohio. Radio Dot moved around quite a bit, and preformed, and recorded under different names, until she and her husband joined WSM's Grand Ole Opry as "Radio Dot & Smokey Swan." I found an interesting advertisement for a show that was held at The Lyric Theatre of Indianapolis, on June 14, 1951. The stage show featured the following acts: Lonzo & Oscar, Carl Smith, Gabe Tucker, Radio Dot & Tucker, Cousin Jody Summey, Betty Lou Swan, Winston County and pea pickers. One of Dot's hit 78 rpm records was "Cryin' Cause I Love You/It Can Be Done." I am enclosing a photograph of Radio Dot and a young man identified as Louis "Smokey" Swan". The photo was taken on March 21, 1940, and they were an attractive couple. The second photo is their daughter Dottie. Dottie is better know in Nashville as Mrs. Rev. Jimmy Rodgers Snow. I don't know if Radio Dot is still with us. If you wish, I can provide you with contact information for the Rev. and Mrs. Jimmy Snow. (As you probably know, Rev. Jimmy is Hank Snow's son.) www.JimmySnow.com and www.JimmySnow.com/Dottie.htm
                 If you have a music related question you'd like to ask, send it to: BillMorrison2002@hotmail.com. Please include your name and town. Due to time restraints, I will not be answering any more questions in regard to the home address, and telephone number of Michael Moore.


    Before They Were Stars

    Hank Cochran worked in the oil fields.
    Danny Davis played in Gene Krupa's band.
    Little Jimmy Dickens worked at several radio stations as "Jimmy The Kid."
    Donna Fargo taught High School English.
    Emmylou Harris was a student at UNC Greensboro, North Carolina.
    Tommy Hunter played Honky Tonks throughout Canada.
    Randy Owen installed carpets.
    Cal Smith was front man, for The Texas Troubadours 1962-1968.
    Ricky Van Shelton was a pipe fitter, and construction worker.
    Tammy Wynette worked as a hairdresser.


    Stage Names
    (all genre's)

    Buddy Alan is Buck and Bonnie Owens son, 'Alvis Alan Owens.'
    Jack Barlow is 'Jack Butcher.'
    Lane Brody is 'Lynn Connie Voorlas.'
    Jeff Carson is 'Jeff Herndon.'
    Spade Cooley is 'Donnell Clyde Cooley.'
    Penny DeHaven is 'Charlotte DeHaven' a.k.a. "Penny Star."
    Glen Glenn is 'Glen Troutman.'
    Doyle Holly is 'Doyle Floyd Hendricks.'
    Cledus T. Judd is 'James Barry Poole.'
    Jody Miller is 'Myrna Joy Brooks.'


    RCNV News Flash

    My Friend Billy London, of The Billy London Trio, will be debuting a Live, Rockabilly Radio Show in the near future. The show is scheduled to run Saturday mornings from 9 to 10 a.m. Live, and recorded music, will be featured every week, in addition to interviews with legends of the genre. Billy is a huge supporter of the Rockabilly Hall of Fame, and many inducted members will be gusting of his show. More information will be provided in the next issue of RCNV ... Good Luck Billy.
    7 facts about Billy London
    1. Billy London sang the original George of the Jungle cartoon theme song.
    2. Billy recorded and played with the Monkees.
    3. Billy was signed by Clive Davis to Columbia Records.
    4. Billy was signed by Les Garland to Atlantic Records.
    5. Billy has appeared on national TV with Stephen Bishop as a pedal steel and guitar player on Don Kirshner's Rock Concert, The Tonight Show, Saturday Night Live and a CBS special with Natalie Cole.
    6. Billy has sang our National Anthem for major league basketball and major league baseball.
    7. Billy worked with the cast of Laverne and Shirley during the 1980 season.


    Did You Know?

    Elvis Presley was born in Tupelo, Mississippi on January 8, 1935. His twin brother "Jesse" was stillborn, and buried in a shoebox in an unmarked grave.

    Tammy Wynette's widower, record producer George Richey, married Sheila Slaughter in College Grove, Tennessee on January 16, 2001. The 34-year-old bride is a former Dallas Cowboy Cheerleader.

    Jerry Lee Lewis' "Would You Take Another Chance On Me" was the No. 1 Country single on January 12, 1972.

    My friend "Eagle" has spread his wings once more. He is flying high in Tennessee and Virginia.

    Sandy Brooks called Garth, prior to a show in Cape Girardeau, Missouri on November 4, 1989. She told him to come home immediately and straighten out their marriage, or she was leaving. Garth did not finish the show.

    Reba McEntire and her husband were passengers on a private plane that crash-landed at Nashville International Airport on November 6, 1992. In 1991, Reba lost her road manager, and seven members of her band, in a plane crash near San Diego, California. There were no injuries as a result of the Nashville incident.

    Robert Lee Parton, age 79, father of Dolly Parton, died in Knoxville, Tennessee on November 12, 2000 from a stroke.

    Wynonna Judd married her former bodyguard D.R. Roach in Leiper's Fork, Tennessee on November 22, 2003.

    Elvis Presley was inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame on November 27, 2001.

    Brenda Lee recorded "Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree" at Owen Bradley's Quonset Hut studio in 1958. The session musicians were; Buddy Harmon on drums, Grady Martin and Hank Garland on guitar, Floyd Cramer on Piano, Bob Moore on stand-up bass, and Harold Bradley on electric bass.

    Linda Gail Lewis, the younger, singing sister of Jerry Lee Lewis, was born July 18, 1947 in Ferriday, Louisiana. Linda married her second husband when she was fifteen years old. Then #3, #4, #5, #6, #7, and #8. It's either the water in Louisiana, or the DNA in Lewis. The saga continues ... RCNV tip of the month:
                 If you're a fan of country music from the 1950's thru the 1980's, back when country music was 'REALLY' country, then subscribe to Country Music Classics. This F R E E  weekly email newsletter is all about classic country music, stories behind the songs, with questions and answers. You can win FREE CD's & cassettes and more! To subscribe, send a blank email to: Classics@countrymusicclassics.com  and type "SUBSCRIBE" in subject line.


    From The Wisdom Desk

                 American values are being eroded day by day, and I believe we are in serious trouble. I'm talking about family, and spiritual values, not any so-called political values.
                 There is nothing in history, to match the dire ends to which humanity can be led, by following a political and social philosophy that consciously, and absolutely, excludes God.
                 "If My people who are called by My name will humble themselves, and pray and seek My f ace, and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin and heal their land."  2 Chronicles 7:14
                 The clock is ticking ... and God is watching. See you all next month, maybe.


    Bill's Favorite Music Links

    http://rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/index.htm
    http://www.opry.com
    http://www.etrecordshop.com
    http://rockabillyhall.com/BillMorrison.html
    http://www.blueridgeopry.com/artists.html
    http://www.clabranson.com
    http://www.countrymusicclassics.com
    http://www.countryweekly.com
    http://www.liveradio.netv
    http://www.musicreview.com
    http://www.radiohof.org
    http://www.stararchive.com
    http://www.whodoesthatsong.com
    http://www.wsmonline.com
    www.ifco.org/links.html
    http://www.countryhall.com
    http://www.talentondisplay.com/countrycalendar.html








    "JULY"
    Volume 12
    June 22, 2004 ©Bill Morrison

    You are cordially invited to join the Rockabilly Hall of Fame's Yahoo Group Chat Room. There are not many sites on the Internet, where you can join in conversations with Legends of Rockabilly, today's artists and songwriters, producers, promoters, disc jockeys and hundreds of fans. If you enjoy the "Rockabilly Country News and Views," you will certainly enjoy the Rockabilly group site. We have members from all over the world. Why not join us; we'd love to have you. Click to subscribe.


    RCNV Spotlight

    MID-EAST "MYSTERY" (Author unknown)
    Everyone seems to be wondering why Muslim terrorists are so quick to commit suicide.
    Let's see now:
    No Wal-Mart, No television, No cheerleaders, No baseball, No football, No basketball, No hockey, No golf, No tailgate parties. No Rockabilly, No Country music. No Carl Perkins, No George Jones. No Interstate highways. No Rockabilly Hall of Fame. No RCNV. No pork BBQ, No hot dogs, No burgers, No lobster, No shellfish, or even frozen fish sticks, No gumbo, No jambalaya. Multiple wives, but No Wanda Jackson!!! Rags for clothes and towels for hats. Constant wailing from the guy next-door because he's sick and there are no doctors. Constant wailing from the guy in the big tower. No chocolate chip cookies. No chocolate chip cookie ice cream. No Christmas. No Easter. No Savior. No hope. You can't shave. Your wives can't shave. You can't shower to wash off the smell of donkey cooked over burning camel dung. The women have to wear baggy dresses and veils at all times. Your bride is picked by someone else. She smells just like your donkey, but your donkey has a better disposition. Then they tell you that when you die it all gets better! I mean, really, "IS THERE A MYSTERY HERE????????????"


    July Highlights

    Eddie Bond, Country/Rockabilly/Gospel singer, born Memphis, TN 7/1/1933.

    Ken Curtis, born "Curtis Wayne Gates," Las Amimar, CA 7/2/1916. Ken was a member of the "Sons of the Pioneers," and played "Festus Hagan," on "Gunsmoke."

    Johnny Cash was discharged from the U. S. Air Force 7/3/1954.

    Marty Robbins performed for President Ronald Reagan, in Washington, D.C. 7/4/1981.

    Elvis Presley cut his first session for Sun Records 7/5/1954. Scotty Moore on lead, Bill Black on bass, Sam Phillips on his way.

    Bill Haley born "William John Clifton Haley Jr.," Highland Park, MI 7/6/1925. Inducted R&RHOF 1987 and RHOF.

    George Morgan, age 50, died in Nashville after bypass surgery, 7/7/1975. George joined the Grand Ole Opry on September 25, 1948, and was inducted into the CMHF in 1998.

    Marty Stuart and Connie Smith were married 7/8/1997. The ceremony took place on an Indian reservation in South Dakota.

    Carl Smith and June Carter were married 7/9/1952.

    Marizona Robinson, age 70, widow of Marty Robbins, died in Brentwood, TN 7/10/2001.

    Kenny Rogers quit The New Christy Minstrels, to form The First Edition 7/11/1967.

    Rockabilly Hall of Fame inductee; Charlie Feathers, Rockabilly singer-songwriter, Sun recording artist, born Myrtle, MS 7/12/1932.

    Buddy Holly almost drowned, while attempting to swim across a lake in Wisconsin, while on tour on 7/13/1958.

    The Everly Brothers break-up while on stage at Knott's Berry Farm, 7/14/1973.

    Bill Justis died in Nashville, TN 7/15/1982.

    Roy Orbison's widow, Barbara Orbison, filed a lawsuit against Sony Music. The suit alleges that Sony underpaid royalties on both foreign and domestic record sales. The Twelve Million Dollar suit requests back payments, plus interest on money owed. 7/16/1998.

    Johnny Cash's last recording session for SUN records 7/17/1958.

    Linda Gail Lewis, younger sister of Jerry Lee Lewis, born Ferriday, LA 7/18/1947.

    SUN Records released Elvis Presley's first single, "That's Alright Mama," 7/19/1954.

    Buddy Knox born Happy, TX 7/20/1933. Inducted Rockabilly Hall of Fame.

    Wanda Jackson released "I Gotta Know," 7/21/1956.

    Buddy Holly recorded four songs for Decca Records in Nashville 7/22/1956.

    Tony Joe White born Oak Grove, LA 7/23/1943.

    Roy Acuff announced his intent to run for governor of Tennessee 7/24/1948.

    Charlie Rich, age 62, died in Hammond, LA 7/25/1995. Charlie was found dead in a Hammond, LA motel room. Death was the result of a blood clot in his lungs.

    Jeannie C. Riley recorded "Harper Valley PTA," 7/26/1968.

    LeAnn Rimes, age 13, recorded her debut album "Blue" on 7/27/1996. The album went to #1, and remained there for twenty-eight weeks.

    Gene Vincent appeared on the "Perry Como Show," 7/28/1956.

    Anita Carter, age 66, "Carter Sisters," died, Goodlettsville, TN 7/29/1999.

    Sam Phillips, age 80, founder of SUN Records, died in Memphis 7/30/2003.

    Jim Reeves, age 39, killed in plane crash near Nashville, TN 7/31/1964. Jim was flying the plane. Also killed in the crash was his pianist Dean Manuel. Reeves inducted CMHF 1967.

    There are 326 additional entries on Bill Morrison's "July" calendar. Check out the complete "On This Day In Music History Calendar" at: www.talentondisplay.com/countrycalendar.html. You can visit Bill Morrison's Hall of Fame page at: www.rockabillyhall.com/billmorrison.html


    What's Happening?

    Fox 200 Pictures will bring the Johnny Cash story to movie theatres sometime this year. The movie features Joaquin Phoenix as Johnny and Reese Witherspoon as June Carter Cash.

    For the first time in the event's 33-year history, CMA Music Festival/Fan Fair will be filmed, and presented as a two-hour television special. The program will air on CBS this summer. The time and date of the broadcast will be announced in the near future. Glen Campbell is scheduled to perform.

    Roy Clark is filming an infomercial to promote Time-Life's "Hee Haw" releases, and he is reportedly negotiating with PBS to co-host a show with Brenda Lee about country music legends.

    Bluegrass entertainer Jimmy Martin has reportedly been diagnosed with bladder cancer, and is taking radiation treatments. Cards and letters may be sent to: Jimmy Martin, P.O. Box 646, Hermitage, Tennessee 37076.

    Want to see country music legends Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, Ray Price, David Allan Coe, and Kris Kristofferson all on one show? Then make plans to attend Willie's Fourth of July Picnic. This years Picnic will be held at the Fort Worth Stockyards and will include Haggard, Price, Coe, Kristofferson and many others. The event will be held on a 27-acre concert field called the North Forty. About 25,000 people are expected to attend the show. Nelson's Fourth of July Picnic was first held in 1973 and has been held in other Texas locales such as Austin and, Luckenbach.

    Trace Adkins is not only the voice of KFC commercials, but he is now appearing in one of their television ads with NASCAR driver Dale Earnhardt, Jr. Earnhardt recently made a guest appearance in Trace's latest video.

    Mergers are the norm these days, and a merger between the USA Network and NBC may cause "Nashville Star" to be moved to NBC. Seemingly more likely, the show that launched Buddy Jewell's career may instead move to CMT, which, according to the Tennessean, has offered show producers nearly the same amount of money that the USA Network pays for the show, a hefty sum by CMT's standards. Brad Schmitt reports that neither USA nor CMT have commented on the possible move.


    Q. & A.

    Robert Z. from Knoxville writes with the following question:

    Q. My grandfather once told me that he met Pee Wee King in 1936, at a radio station here in Knoxville. Do you have any idea, which radio station Mr. King worked for? I would also like to know what Pee Wee's real name was. Hope you can help, I read your column every month.

    A. Robert thanks for your e-mail. A little research revealed that Pee Wee King played on WNOX in Knoxville, Tennessee in 1936, the same year that he married his manager's daughter. A short time later he moved to WSM's Grand Ole Opry. After making his debut guest appearance on the Opry, Pee Wee was invited to become a regular member that same night. Pee Wee's birth name was "Julius Frank Anthony Kucznski." Pee Wee was 5'6" tall.

    If you have a music related question you'd like to ask, send it to: BillMorrison2002@hotmail.com.


    RCNV tip of the month:

    If you're a fan of country music from the 1950's thru the 1980's--back when country music was 'REALLY' country--then subscribe to Country Music Classics--a F R E E weekly email newsletter all about classic country music.... stories behind the songs--questions and answers...win FREE CD's & cassettes and more! To subscribe...send blank email to: Classics@countrymusicclassics.com and type "SUBSCRIBE" in subject line. Before They Were Stars:

    Mac Davis was regional manager for Vee-Jay Records in Atlanta, Georgia.
    Bonnie Guitar worked as a demo singer.
    Stonewall Jackson worked on a farm.
    Norma Jean joined the Porter Wagoner Show as the girl singer.
    Johnny Lee served four years in the U. S. Navy.
    Neal McCoy was the opening act for Charlie Pride.
    Shane Minor served as a police officer on the LAPD, and was a Rodeo bull rider.
    Collin Raye was a lounge singer.
    Jeannie Seely worked as a disc jockey.
    Doug Stone was a mechanic.
    Clay Walker worked on a ranch.
    Darryl Worley was a chemist, schoolteacher, construction worker, and commercial fisherman.


    Stage Names (all genre's)

    Julie Wells is Julie Andrews
    Daniel H. Shipley is R. C. Bannon
    Paul David Hewson is Bono
    Freddy Picariello is Freddy Cannon
    Rebecca Carlene Smith is Carlene Carter
    Cherilyn Sarkisian La Piere is Cher
    Jill Byrem is Lacy J. Dalton
    Vito Farinola is Vic Damone
    Henry John Deutschendorf Jr. is John Denver
    Concetta Rose Maria Franconero is Connie Francis
    Julio Jose Iglesias de la Cueva is Julio Iglesias
    Royden Dickey Lipscombe is Dickey Lee


    RCNV News Flash:

    Nashville songwriter Susie Morrison Hill was operated on at a Nashville hospital in mid-June. Her husband is John Hill, fiddler/guitarist/back-up singer, with the Grand Ole Opry's Trace Adkins. John reports that Susie is now home and is expected to make a full recovery.

    Superstar Dolly Parton was back in the recording studio last month in Nashville. This time recording with Bluegrass favorite Randy Kohrs. Randy recently signed with a new label and will have a new CD on the market in the near future. One of the songs on that album was written about RCNV author, Bill Morrison's mother. (Lena Mae) The song was written by Susie Hill & Randy Kohrs.


    Did You Know?

    The first band Roy Acuff worked with was the "Three Rolling Stones." (1932)

    Pee Wee King hired Lloyd "Cowboy" Copas to replace Eddy Arnold in the Golden West Cowboys band in 1945.

    Ernest Tubb debuted on the Grand Ole Opry in December 1942. He sang "Walking The Floor Over You," and received 3 encores. One month later he moved to Nashville and joined the Grand Ole Opry.

    In 1967, Jack Greene won the CMA awards for: "Single of the Year," "Album of the Year," "Song of the Year" and "Male Vocalist of the Year."

    The first artist to record a song written by Tom T. Hall was Jimmy C. Newman. The song was "D J for A Day."

    The "Riders in the Sky" were inducted into the Western Music Hall of Fame in 1993.

    Roy Rogers first wife, Arlene, the mother of his first three children, died shortly after the birth of their 3rd child, Roy Jr., in 1946.

    Sawyer Brown originally named the band "Savannah." They took the name Sawyer Brown from a road near Nashville, TN.

    Hank Williams met "Audrey Mae Sheppard Guy," while traveling with a medicine show. They were married in December 1944.

    Hank took his first airplane ride the last week in March 1949. Based on the huge success of Lovesick Blues, MGM wanted him back in the studio immediately. Hank flew from Shreveport to Nashville.

    Billie Jean Jones was still married to her first husband, when Hank Williams married her in 1952. She later married Johnny Horton. Her father was a Bossier City, LA policeman.

    Jean Shepard grew up in Southern California.  While in High School, she and some friends formed the "Melody Ranch Girls" band. Jean sang and played upright bass.

    Grand Ole Opry star Mike Snider became "National Bluegrass Banjo Champion" at age 23.

    Hank Snow recorded his 104th LP for RCA Victor in 1977.

    The jukebox debuted in America in 1927.

    The Statler Brothers retired from the road in 2003, after 38 years.


    From The Wisdom Desk:

    MY FIRST LOVE

                 I first met her in high school. She was older than I was and exciting. She'd been around. My parents warned me to have nothing to do with her. They claimed that no good could come from our relationship.
                 But I kept meeting her on the sly. She was so sophisticated and worldly. It made me feel grown up just being with her. It was fun to take her to a party in those days. She was almost always the center of attention.
                 We began seeing more of each other after I joined the navy. When I got a place of my own, she was a frequent guest. It wasn't long before she moved in with me. It may have been common law, but it was heartbreaking for my parents. I kept reminding myself I wasn't a kid anymore. Besides, it was legal.
                 We lived together right through my military service, and into my early days in the music business. I seldom went anywhere without her, but I wasn't blind. I knew she was unfaithful to me. What's worse, I didn't care. As long as she was there for me when I needed her (and she always was), it didn't matter.
                 The longer we lived together, the more attached I became to her. But it wasn't mutual. She began to delight in making me look foolish in front of my friends. But I still couldn't give her up.
                 It became a love/hate relationship. I figured out that her glamour was nothing more than a cheap mask to hide her spite and cynicism behind. I could no longer see her beauty after I came to know her true character.
                 But old habits are hard to break. We had invested many years in each other. Even though my relationship with her made me lose a little respect for myself, she had become the center of my life. We didn't go anywhere. We didn't do anything. We didn't have friends over. It was just the two of us. I became deeply depressed and knew that she was largely responsible for my misery. I finally told her I was leaving her for good. It took a lot of guts, but I left.
                 I still see her around. She's still as beautiful as when we first met. I miss her now and then. I'm not boasting when I say she'd take me back in a minute. But by the grace of God, I will never take up with her again.
                 If you see her, just give her my regards. I don't hate her. I just loved her too much. Chances are you know her family. The name is Alcohol.

    Note: In 1948 my four-year old brother was run over by a drunk driver. He died in my mother's arms. I have thought about that beautiful, loving child, almost every day of my life, for the past fifty-six years. Drunk driving is the nation's most frequently committed violent crime. Please…don't drink and drive.


    Bill's Favorite Music Links:

    http://rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/index.htm "Rockin' Country Style" by Terry E. Gordon
    http://www.etrecordshop.com Ernest Tubbs Record Shops
    http://rockabillyhall.com/BillMorrison.html Bill Morrison's Rockabilly HOF page
    http://www.blueridgeopry.com/artists.html World Rockabilly Coalition
    http://www.clabranson.com Country Legends Association
    http://www.countrymusicclassics.com Doug Davis shares his knowledge of our music
    http://www.countryweekly.com Country Music Magazine
    http://www.liveradio.netv Many Internet Radio Stations
    http://www.musicreview.com Music Industry Search Engine
    http://www.radiohof.org Radio Hall of Fame
    http://www.stararchive.com Links to the Stars
    http://www.whodoesthatsong.com Who sang that song?
    http://www.wsmonline.com WSM online
    www.ifco.org/links.html Fan Club Links
    http://www.countryhall.com Traditional Country Music Hall of Fame
    http://www.oldiesmusic.com/index.html Great Oldies Site
    www.talentondisplay.com/countrycalendar.html" Bill's "On This Day In Music History" Calendar







    Bill's Previous Monthly Columns Here

    Bill's Web Page

    E-mail the Rockabilly Hall of Fame Office

    ©1997, ©2005   Rockabilly Hall of Fame® / Bill Morrison